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November 23, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-23

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Nine Wolverine Grldders To End College G

ireer

Janowic s
Stellar Play
Sparks OSU
Buckeye Offense
Features Passing
(Continued from Page 1)
Stribe, Jim Wolter and Tom Kel-
sey.
OHIO STATE BEGAN the cur-
rent campaign as big favorites to
cut fancy figures in league and na-
tional circles, but they had trouble
making a one-season transition
from single wing to Coach Woody
Hayes' T-formation.
Their 0-0 tie with the Illini
a week ago is the only imper-
fection on the record of the cur-
rent Conference leaders, and as
a result the Bucks rate a slight
choice over Michigan, now mir-
ed in a three-game losing streak.
In the starring role for Ohio is
triple threat halfback Vic Jano-
wicz. Winner of the Heisman tro-
phy and All-American plaudits
last year, Janowicz has failed to
live up to high expectations so far
this season, but he is still the
workhorse in the Buckeye back-
field.
He holds down the left halfback
position from where he runs, puntsi
* * *

Big Ten Crown at Stake
As Illini Clash with NU

'M' HOLDS EDGE:
Brilliant Victories Mark OSU Series

I- ---, - --t- --

VIC JANOWICZ
.triple threat
and passes. He shares throwing
assignments with the quarterback,
Tony Curcillo.
FULLBACK JACK Wagner and
freshman sensation Doug Good-
sell at right half complete the
Ohio backifeld. Goodsell has suc-
ceeded in wresting the starting as-
signment away from letterman
Walt Klevay who was a leading
ground gainer in the loop last
year.
The rookie was hurt early in
last week's game, however, and
Klevay turned in a sparkling
performance so he'll probably
see some extended duty this aft-
ernoon.
Michigan's familiar backfield is
ready to roll again, with. Putich at
left half, Wes Bradford on the
wing, Ted Topor as the blocking
quarterback and Peterson at full.
THE WOLVERINES WENT
through a signal drill on the sog-
gy turf of Ferry Field yesterday
afternoon and all hands are re-
ported in good physical condition.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan spent a
few moments after the workout
talking to his players in a last
minute effort to key them up for
the final battle.
They spent the night in their
pre-game base at the University
golf clubhouse, while the Buck-
eyes set up camp in Toledo. They
arrived in Ann Arbor this morn-
ing.
No Ohio State team has beaten
Michigan since the 1944 edition
turned the trick by an 18-14 mar-
gin. A 7-7 tie in 1949 gave the
9 9 *

DON PETERSON
. . . hard driving fullback
Key Battles
Mark Final*
Grid Gamnes
NEW ,YORK-(/P)-The South,
Southwest and far West offers
much of the college football dyna-
mite today as the fading 1951 sea-
son comes up with half a dozen
bowl-tinged games.
A possibility that Tennessee, the
nation's No. 1 team, might be
knocked off by up-and-coming
Kentucky has made this tradition-
al battle at Lexington, Ky., a
clash of national interest before
36,000.
* * *
HOWEVER, there's plenty of
action elsewhere on the pigskin
firing line, with such pairings as
Illinois-Northwestern, California-
Stanford, Southern Methodist-
Baylor, Texas Christian-Rice, Wis-
consin-Minnesota, and Purdue-In-
diana. All have a New Year's day
bowl flavor.
The Big Ten's Rose Bowl rep-
resentative can be decided at
Evanston, Ill. Illinois can clinch
the trip west by defeating or
tieing Northwestern betfore a sell-
out throng of 54,000.
Wisconsin and Purdue are still
in the running if Illinois falters.
THE OTHER HALF of the Rose
Bowl picture is finished, for Stan-
ford, winner of nine straight
games, has clinched the Pacific
Coast Conference title. Stanford
is host to twice-beaten California
before a S.R.O. crowd of 90,108 at
Palo Alto. In another major west-
ern affair, some 75,000 will watch
Southern California and U.C.L.A.
at Los Angeles. Stanford is the
only team to beat Southern Cali-
fornia in conference play.
In the Southwest, where all is
confusion as usual, Texas Chris-
tian and Rice will try to break
their first-place conference dead-
lock before 25,000 at Fort Worth.
These two, along with Baylor
and Texas, still are in the run-
ning for the title and a cotton
Bowl berth against Kentucky.
Baylor plays dangerous South-
ern Methodist in Waco before 30,-
000, although the Southwest snarl
won't be untangled until a week
later. Texas plays Texas A&M
next Thursday, while Baylor meets
Rice and Texas Christian tackles
S.M.U. Dec. 1. An Orange Bowl
bid may go to one of the scrap-
ping Southwest outfits.
Powerful Princeton, the No. 5
club in the AP poll and tops in the
East, can clinch a second straight
Ivy League crown by taking Dart-
mouth before 35,000 at Princeton.
Tomorrow also is farewell to 1951's
regular campaign for Stanford,
No. 3; Illinois, No. 6; Wisconsin,
No. 8; and Kentucky, No. 9.
Sailors Seek
A ngstenCup
Michigan's all-weather Sailing
Club will climax a hectic year of
nautical activity this coming week-
end when it competes for the cov-
eted Timme Angsten Memorial
Trophy at the Northwestern Fall
Invitational Regatta on Lake
Michigan in Chicago.
Sixteen colleges will race for the
trophy, presented in memory of
one of the Midwest's most promin-
ent collegiate sailing enthusiasts.
AMONG THEM will be Purdue,

Ohio State, Northwestern, Notre
Dame, Wisconsin, DePauw, Tufts
and Georgetown.
Racing skippers and their
crews will use ten foot "dyer-
dees" to navigate icy Lake Mich-
igan and its tricky winds. Last
year only ten out of a scheduled
34 races were able to be held as
a result of the furious gales.
With a successfuis Aasonnof r -

EVANSTON, Ill.-Illinois' roar-
ing Rose Bowl express hits its final
curve today against a jinx bear-
ing Northwestern squad in a tense
Big Ten final.
A crowd of 54,000 will fill Dyche
Stadium to see the nation's sixth
ranked team try to produce its
first victory over a Bob Voigt
coached Northwestern team.
* * *
THE UNBEATEN but once tied
Illini, rule a two-touchdown fa-
vorite over the Wildcats, who de-
railed a similar California bound
special last season.
Seeking their fifth victory in
a row over Illinois, the Wildcats
hope to repeat their knockout
victory of last season which
spilled the Illini from the Big
Ten drivers seat and tumbled
I them to third in the Conference
standings.
If Northwestern repeats, the
rose scented crown would go to
either Wisconsin or Purdue. A tie
would still give Illinois the crown.
AT BLOOMINGTON Purdue will
go after a possible Western Con-
ference football championship at
Indiana today with no more-and
no less-enthusiasm than it car-
ried into their 1950 game for the
Big Ten cellar.
Northwestern must defeat Ill-
nois to make the Purdue-Indiana
scrap anything but another tra-
ditional contest for the Old
Big Ten1
St irngs

Oaken Bucket. But the pail
that Morgan the Raider maybe
drank out of always is enough
incentive for the intrastate rivals
to knock themselves out.
Purdue won in a blizzard at La-
fayette last year, 13-0, with John
Durham running back the opening
kickoff 84 yards for a touchdown.
THE 54TH meeting of the teams
is pretty much of a toss up in
spite of a 4-4 Purdue record com-
pared with Indiana's 2-6. Indiana
has played a tougher schedule and
reached its peak last week by
matching Michigan State's four!
touchdowns in a 30-26 defeat.
At Minneapolis Minnesota and
Wisconsin wind up their 1951
Big Ten seasons today in the
61st renewal of their football
rivalry, with the Badgers still in
the running for the champion-
ship and the Rose Bowl.
Wisconsin-rated eighth in the
nation in the Associated Press poll
-is heavily favored to win. The
Badgers can take the title only if
they win and Illinois loses, and
Purdue either loses or ties.
WISCONSIN tops the Big Ten
in both offense and defense. Its
defensive platoon has held its op-
ponents to an average of less than
150 yards per game. However, on
the other side of the picture is
Minnesota's record of averaging
some 300 yards per game against
all opponents.
At East Lansing, Colorado
comes winging out of the west
ready to give Michigan State its
make or break football battle
today.
A win -in the last game would
probably make the Spartans num-
ber one team in the country. A
loss would break a 14-game win-
ning streak dating back to the
Maryland game early last year.
Colorado has won seven out of
nine so far this season. The Buf-
faloes are trying to build up into
a football power. An upset would
convince the country they have
arrived.

I
1
t
t
1
1
1
7
1
f
1,

Illinois ......
Wisconsin ...
Purdue..
MICHIGAN..
Ohio State...
Northwestern
Minnesota ...
Indiana..
Iowa.........

A4
4
4
3
1
a

L
0
1
2
1
3
3
t

T
1
1
0
0
0
0

Pct.
.900
.750
.750
.600
.600..
.400
.300
.200
.091

PF
82
128
95
108
66.
41
83
60
91

OP
23
34
88
54
59
86
123
86
196

f .J
Cards Giee
iflarion Gate
As Manager
ST. LOUIS-(P)-Marty Marion,
Mr. Shortstop of another year, was
eased out as a manager of the St.
Louis Cardinals in a surprise move
yesterday.
Owner Fred Saigh wouldn't say
why the rookie manager was giv-
en the gate but it generally was
believed Saigh felt Marion lacked
aggressiveness, despite the club's
third place finish last season.
SAIGH INSISTED he had no
one in mind for the job. Immediate
speculation on his no. 1 choice for
the job pointed at Eddie Stanky,
the New York Giant's fiery secondj
baseman.I
Previous statements by Saigh
and Marionsindicated that their
conference today was merely to
settle the question of whether
Marion's contract would be re-
newed for one or two years.
The unexpected announcement
was made by Saigh after he had
talked with Marion for an hour.
"WE ARE NOT renewing Mr.
Marion's contract as manager of
the Cardinals," he said. "No com-
ment on reasons. We have no suc-
cessor in mind."
The 33-year-old Marion, one
of the game's best shortstops,
until he was sidelined by an ail-
ing knee before the start of the
1951 season, said it "came as a
complete surprise to me." Saigh
told him, he said, that he "did
not think I'm the man for the
job."
Marion said he would like to re-
sume his career as a player-but
only if he can regain the form that
won him the title of "Mr. Short-
stop" in his 11 years in that posi-
tion with the Redbirds.
Asked if he were interested in
Stanky for the manager's job,
Saigh replied "I cannot be inter-
ested in Stanky because he is the
property of the New York Giants."
Under the rules of baseball,
club representatives cannot tam-
per with players on other teams
without permission of their own-
ers.

FRED PICKARD
.. aggressive end

By IVAN KAYE
Time honored gridiron enemies
Michigan and Ohio State clash
today for the forty-eighth time in
their colorful fifty-four year ri-
valry.
The Wolverines have won thir-
ty-one and tied four in the series
which began back in 1897 with a'
36-0 Michigan victory.
OHIO STATE had to wait twen-
ty-two years and fourteen games
before their 1919 outfit turned in
a 13-3 victory over the Maize and
Blue. That was the Buckeye team
led by All American Chic Harley'
and quarterbacked by Howard
Yerges Sr.
A pair of blocked kicks in 1920
and a recovered fumble in 1921
spelled two victories for Ohio
and brought criticism of Field-
ing Yost by a few disgruntled
Michigan alumni. This was in
spite of the fact that Ohio was
the only one to beat the Wol-
verines in those otherwise good
seasons.
In general Yost was encour-
aged by the alumni and he and
the team showed their apprecia-
tion by spoiling the dedication of
the great Ohio Stadium in 1922
with a resounding 19-0 conquest of
the Buckeyes. Harry Kipke paced

Government Views TV Bans
Illegal in Kentucky Grid Case

TODAY'S GAMES,
Ohio State at Michigan
Illinois at Northwestern
Wisconsin at Minnesota
Purdue at Indiana

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - 5) - The
Department of Justice tossed a
bombshell into the college foot-
ball-television situation last night
when it made clear it considered
illegall the restriction of tlecasts
of big time games.
The explosive situation came to
a head as the result of Kentucky
Governor Lawrence W. Wetherby's
wire to Attorney General McGrath
asking to permit a telecast of to-
day's big Tennessee - Kentucky
game at Lexington.
T H E NATIONAL Collegiate
Athletic Association previously re-
jected a request to permit a tele-
cast of the game despite pressure
from public officials.'
The NCAA set up a controlled
one year program last Septem-
ber to test the effects of televi-
sion on football attendance. A
total of 19 games were listed on

the victors with two touchdowns
and a thirty-four yard fieldgoal.
* *
THE 1926 SPECTACLE, played
at Columbus before a roaring
crowd of 95,000, stands as one of
the most exciting games in football
history. It brought together the''
Michigan team of Friedman and
Oosterbaan and an unbeaten
Buckeye squad which boasted a
great line-plunger in Marty
Karow.
It was a wild battle from the
opening gun as the Bucks grab-
bed a 10-0 lead; but the Yost-
men came tearing down the
field in the waning moments of
the first half and Bennie Ooster-
baan crossed the goal with a
pass from Friedman to make
it 10-7. Seconds later Michigan
recovered an Ohio fumble on the
forty and as the gun sounded
Friedman powered a tremen-
dous fieldgoal over the bar to
knot the score at halftime.
Early in the final quarter Fried-
man contacted Oosterbaan in the
end zone to put Michigan out in
front 17-10. With only a few min-
utes left, Karow led the spirited
Bucks on a brilliant seventy-nine
yard scoring march, ripping the
Michigan forward wall to shreds
in the process. Now only the con-
version separated the two teams.

a schedule starting Sept. 29 and
running through Nov. 24.
* 5, 5
INFORMED THAT the NCAA
TV committss had unanimously
ruled against any telecast, the
Kentucky Board of Trustees said
it would have to go along with the
NCAA because it is a member and
because it agreed to the original
blackout plan.
Newell A. Clapp, acting chief,
of the anti-trust division of the
Department of Justice, advised
Gov. Wetherby to note the anti-
trust suit filed Oct. 9 against the
professional National Football
League for similar broadcasting
restrictions.
Clapp indicated that similar ac-
tion will be taken against collegi-
ate groups if the department wins
the Philadelphia suit. Clapp hopes
a decision wil lhe rendered in that
case within the near future.

RUSS OSTERMAN
.. deadly on defense
21-7. "Fritz" Crisler's Wolverin
got revenge in 1943 with a 45-
mauling of the Ohioans.
In 1946 a Michigan squad whit
was one year away from greatne
went down to Columbus ar
slaughtered Ohio State, 58-6 i
one of the worst beatings ev
administered to a major gridiro
power.
Last year, with a championsh
riding on the outcome, the Main
and Blue paced by Carl Kraeger
sure-handed passing from cents
and Chuck Ortman's brilliai
punting, forged a historic 9-3 ui
set victory.

MYERS CLARK, who had kick
ed a fieldgoal earlier, stood ami
the thundering cheers, and as th
second hand entered its final rei
lution, swung his leg into the ba
In the gathering dusk he bare.
lifted it off the ground. A secon
later the game was history. Mieh
igan 17, Ohio 16. The Buckeye
were beatep, and a great Michiga
squad ruled the Western Confer
ence.
Another battle of unbeaten
teams took place here in Ann
Arbor in 1933 with the Wolver
ines emerging a 13-0 winner
Once again the outcome decided
the conference championship.
Tom Harmon and company bur
ied the Buckeyes 40-0 in 1940 an
forced the resignation of tlie Oh:
coach, Francis Schmidt. The ne:
season brought Paul Brown c
Massilon fame to the helm at Cc
lumbus. Brown succeeding in hol
ing Michigan to a 20-20 tie i
1941, and the following season h
team beat the Maize and Blu
* * *

TELLTALE TOTALS:
Statistics reveal Wolverines
Weakest Against Passing Foe

By ERIC VETTER
Season statistics often turn up
revealing and unusual facts and
Michigan's totals this year prove
no exception.
Due to the Wolverine's mid-sea-
son surge against Indiana, Iowa,
and Minnesota, they have out-
scored their opponents on an over-
all basis 128-123. In the three
games mentioned the Michigan
gridders piled up 108 points to 41
for their opponents.
MICHIGAN STATE'S 25-0 win
is the most lopsided defeat Mich-
igaA has suffered, while the other
four reverses have come on mar-
gins of thirteen points or less. In-
cluded are shutouts by Illinois and
Northwestern.
Only in pass interceptions and
yards penalized do the Wolver-
ines hold a statistical edge over
their opponents.
Despite Northwestern's five in-
terceptions on Saturday, Michigan
holds a 17-15 overall edge in this
department. As for penalties, the
Wolverines have had 313 yards
stepped off against them as com-
pared to their opponents 380.
MICHIGAN'S offense is primar-
ily a running kind and this is
born out inthe important first
down totals. Here the Maize and
Blue have rushed for 74 of their
103 first downs compared with
their opponents 78 first downs by
rushing. The foes first downs by
passing surpass Michigan, 44-25,
however.
In overall yards gained Mich-
igan trails their opponents by
500 yards and is short of the
total netted by the 1949-50 out-
fits.
This year Michigan has gained
1896 yards in eight games to com-
pare with the 2461 yards the 1949,
and the 2254 yards the 1950 teams
made in nine games.
THE GREATEST slump by a
Wolverine department is in pass
defense. Sixty-seven of the enemy
aerials have dropped into intend-
ed receivers hands for a .475 com-
pletion percentage which is the
largest in several years. Michigan,
on the other hand, has completed
45 passes for a .385 average.
In other departments, Bill
Billings and Don Peterson haveI
a combined punting average of
33.2 yards as compared to the

team average is 2.9 yards per try.
Frank Howell is second in average
rushing at 5.0 and is followed by
Peterson who has a 4.2 average.
Bradford is the second leading
ground gainer with Bill Putich
third.
Putich heads the Wolverine
passers with 316 yards gained
on his heaves. Peterson follows
with 185 yards but leads the
completion averages with a .545
percentage. Putich follows with
a .393 average, the same as the
team average.
Lowell Perry leads the receivers
with 15 catches good for 383 yards.
Fred Pickard is next with 200 yards
on 9 receptions.

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Buckeyes a share of the Big Ten
crown and a trip to the Rose

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