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November 04, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TH ER

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TIRtEIC

1

ILENT YOUTH?
U', Time Surveys Conflict

an

LOOK and LISTEN
With PAULA EDELMAN

i

T 7
J8-

By VIRGINIA VOSS
The American younger genera-
ion is'not as clearly-defined a lot
s the current Time magazine sur-
ey pictured them, if a spot com-
arison of campus leaders with
ime's definition of American
outh is any indication.
"Is it possible to paint a por-
rait of an entire generation?",
the November 5 issue of Time asks.
Recognizing that youth's actions
lepend on hidden motives which
nterviewing can't reveal, Time
ievertheless concludes that "each
;eneration has some features that
re more significant than others."
IN BOLD-FACE subtitles, Time
summarizes the features of the
present generation of 18 to 28
year olis: "They are grave, fatal-
tic, conventional and gregarious.
he girls want a career-and mar-
riage; their morals are confused;
hey expect disappointment; they
ant a, faith; they will serve."
Through the entire survey,
Time emphasises the most start-
ling characteristic of today's
youth is its silence.
However, Ann Arborites don't
ind youth quite so easy to pin
own. Collectively, the picture
hey present of the younger gen-
gration is less depressing than
Time's adjectives "grave" and "fa-
alistic;' would imply.
Dean of Students Erich A. Wal-
er sees his charges as "well-
annered realists, hardworking
nd more analytical and question-
g than they were 25 years ago.
hey see no bogey-men; on the
her hand, they don't expect to
surprised by an angel," he
ated.
Dean Walter said the Time ar-
icle was incomplete in that it
failed to evaluate the 25 to 28-
year-old group of World War II
veterans who figure importantly
in an overall picture of youth.
* * *
PROF. PRESTON W. Slosson,
a member of the history depart-
ment 'since 1921, noted three
improvements in t h e student
body over a 30 year period:
(1) a higher level of classroom
wo r k, (2) increased interest'

tt
-Diy-ilHapo
FACE.OF.YUTH....'

That hodge-podge conglomera-
tion of everything-but-the-kitchen
sink, the hour long TV variety
show, may soon become extinct if
some of the top comedians have
their way.
Eddie Cantor is leading the in-
surrection against the hour show,
protesting that it is not good for
either the comedian's reputation
or his health.
CANTOR IN an interview in
"Variety" pointed out that this
type of program is too great a
C -I
Campus
Calendar
Events Today
Hillel-Prof. Abraham Kaplan
of the philosophy department will
speak on the subject "Of Human
Bondage" at 7:30 p.m. in the Lea-
gue

S * *
in politics and world affairs and
(3) a greater maturity, shaped by
the veteran students during and
immediately after war years.
"There is no trend today zor-
responding to the indifference
of the 20's, or the radicalism
of the 30's," he emphasized.
Commenting on Time's label
"The Silent Generation," Slosson
said that even in the roaring
twenties, "the average student was
always a shy bird."
Jack Smart, '52, president of
IFC, classed most students in the
go-along-with-the-gang category,
and blamed the governmental set-
up for wide-spread lack of incen-
tive. But he disagreed with Time's
observation that young people
"have relatively little ambition to
do any of society's organizing."
AIM president, Dave Ponitz, '52,
and Bill Eggleston, '52, president
of Alpha Tau Omega, concurred
on the belief that "the desire to
be well-fixed" in future life was
a characteristic ambition of the
young today.
Students generally felt that

:>

* * *

their present actions were consti- P.
tutngnodiserabe ten. he Prof. Kaplan, whose talk will
tuting no discernable trend. They be jointly sponsored by Hillel and
agreed with Time's findings that IZFA, is a visiting professor from
this generation, more than any- UCLAs
thing else, wants a good secure , ,
job, and that draft-age men arev
almost universally resigned to a Events Tomorrow
few years with the armed services. FRENCH CLUB-The French
* -' Club will feature games, singing,
DISCUSSING the typical Amer- and refreshments at its meeting
ican young woman, Time states at 8 p.m. in the League.
"she would like, if possible, to have
a marriage and career both." FOOD POISONING - Dr. W.
However, Ann Arbor representa- Charles Cockburn of London will
tives of what Time calls "the gen- address a public health school as-
eration's most serious problem," sembly at 4 p.m. in the school's
feel that matrimony is still wo- j'auditorium.

Ustrain both on the comic and the
flow of material.
Danny Thomas and Jimmy
Durante also are reported to
have kicked to NBC demanding
a half hour spot every other
week instead of their present
hour every four or five weeks.
Besides complaining about the
load, they claimed that by the
infrequency of their appearanc-
es, they tend to lose their identi-
fication to the TV audience.
This kind of pressure coming
directly from within is likely to be
very effective in removing this
malignant growth on TV.
Far from the yaks and tapdanc-
ing routines of the variety show
are the efforts of "Studio One"
(CBS-TV-WJBK 10 p.m. Monday)
which has been consistently pre-
senting artistically good dramas.
Their noble efforts pioneering in
the dramatization of the classics
on TV is particularly worth note.
Recently they presented Mac-
beth complete with constumes
which over shadowed their earlier
production of Coriolanus and Ju-
lius Caesar. And Despite the limi-
tations which television imposed
on this production, such as prob-
lems of sound, audibility and
lighting plus the short time (one
hour including time out for com-
mercials) allowed for the actual
play, it was Shakespeare and had
a touch of the majesty of Shakes-
peare. A rare treat indeed for TV.
Next Monday Studio One will
present Paul Hartman and Patri-
cia Collinge in "The Hero."
Conferences
'On Education
To OpenHere
H i g h school principals and
teachers, junior college deans and
delegates from surrounding col-
leges will assemble on campus for
two two-day conferences which
will .be held tomorrow and Tues-
day.
The preparatory shool dele-
gates will interview graduates of
143 high schools and nine junior
colleges who have entered the
University since last June during
the 23rd annual Principal-Fresh-
man and Junior College Confer-
ence.
Approximately 1300 newly ar-
rived students will have an op-
portunity to express their opinions
on their preparation for and ad-
justment to 'University life.
Glimpses of the University ori-
entation program for new students
will greet arriving delegates to
the Fourth annual Directors of
Orientation Conference. Sixty
representatives from about 40 col-
leges will attend the opening ses-
sion.
The purpose of the conference
is to allow exchange of ideas and
materials among the men respon-
sible for orientation in the parti-
cipating colleges. It also pro-
vides an opportunity for each visi-
tor to evaluate his own program.

man's chief goal.

"There are plenty of girls who
are thinking of marriage alone,"
Cathy Sotir, '52, President of
the League, and Beverly Clarke,
'52, president of Panhelleric As-
sociation, agreed.

The doctor will speak on "Studies
of Food Poisoning in England and
Wales."
Coming Events
FINE ARTS-The fine arts de-I
partment will present Frederick S.

Miss Sotir, who recently ietu.n- Wight, noted painter and writer,,
ed from a convention of Women in a lecture on "Genius of Lyonel
of the Defense Decade, said that Feininger" at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday
this organization stressed raising in the west gallery, Alumni Me-
a family as women's prime duty morial Hall.
to the country. . * *

t- P
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Dean of Women Deborah Baconj
hinted at the impossibility of a
marriage - career combination --
"practically everyone would like to
have his cake and eat it too(J"
Time portrays youth's attitude
toward religion as a cautious at-
tempt to find a secure faith, not
as a formal religious revival.
Rev. Dwight Large, of the Meth-
odist Church, sees no general in-
crease in church attendance, as
does Time. He noted that those
who do attend do more serious
thinking than previous genera-
tions.
Lane Hall Director DeWitt C.
Baldwin, said that his experience
substantiated Time's reported in-+
creaser in church attendance.
One of Time's findings struck a
dissonant note with student, fac-
ulty, and administration alike. Noi
one agreed that "the younger gen-
eration seems to drink less." R

CHEMISTRY-Prof. H. J. En-
eleus, of Cambridge University,
will talk on "Organo-metallic
Compounds Containing Fluoro-
carbon Radicals" at 4:15 p.m.
Tuesday in Rm. 1300, Chemistry
Bldg.
EDUCATION-The 22nd Annual
Parent Education Institute will
convene Wednesday and Thursday
at the Rackham Bldg.
Dean James B. Edmonson and
Prof. Stanley Diamond, of the edu-
cation school will speak at the
opening sessions.
FILMS-The University exten-
sion service and the audio-visual
education center will present three
films at 4:10 Wednesday at Kel-
logg Auditorium.
The films are titled "Cuba -
the Land and its People," "Java"
and "Malaya - Nomads of the
Jungle."

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