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November 03, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

" SATURDAY, NOVEMMERt 3, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE PMV

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1951 PAGE FIVE
I I

Wolverine Fans Board ilini-Bound Special

Geo. Szell
To Conduct
Tomorrow
Fourth in the Choral Union
Series, the Cleveland Symphony
under the direction of George Szell
will present a concert at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium.
The program for the concert
will include "Tragic" Overture,
Opus 81 by Brahms; "Diverti-
mento for String Orchestra" by
Bartok, and "Ein Heldenleben,"
Tone Poem, Opus 40 by Strauss.
UNDER SZELL'S direction, the
Cleveland Orchestra has increased
its activity and widened the scope
of its organization until it now
stands as one of America's finest
orchestras.
During its winter season of 30
weeks it gives 151 concerts, more
than the total given by any other
American Orchestra. These in-
clude Sunday afternoon "Twi-
light" concerts, children's con-
certs, and a series of joint per-
formances with the Ballet Russe
or the Ballet Theatre.
Tickets for the concert are still
available at the University Musical
Society or at Hill Auditorium the
night of the performance.

ANCIENT BONES WANTED:
'U' Anthropologists Seek
Michigan Fossil Sources

By BARBARA GOLDBLUM
Southern Michigan fossils are
needed by the anthropology de-
partment.
Prof. James B. Griffin of the
department has urged that the re-
mains of any large boned animals
discovered by Michiganders be re-
ported immediately to the Univer-
sity Museum.
He explained that an immediate
report was necessary in order to
enable experts to examine and
complete the excavation of bones
as early as possible.
SINCE 1949, when a new sys-
tem of determining the age of fos-
sils was installed at the Univer-
sity, the anthropology department
has been seeking fossils of masto-
dons and other late Pleistocene
fauna which would qualify to be
used.
This age discovering method
was perfected in relatively re-
cent times at the University of
Chicago, Prof. Griffin pointed
out, and has been used exten-
sively there. It has never been
tried on Michigan fossils.
The method utilizes radioactive
Carbon 14 which is formed in the
earth's outer atmosphere and dur-
ing a plant's life becomes a part
of its body. Animals receive Car-

bon 14 into their bodies by eating
plants. Every living organism has
a high content of this element in
its body. In animals it is incor-
porated into their bones.
* * *
AT THE organism's death, the
in-taking process ceases and the
atoms disintegrate at a known
rate of speed. At death, this rate
is 12.4 counts per minute. Fifty-
five hundred years later this rate
has dropped to exactly half.
The age determining proce-
dure utilizes this activity count
by comparing it with a curve
and the animal's period of ex-
istence is determined.
A fossil must be free of all other
carbon or living material before
this process can be used. Many
fossils do not meet this qualifica-
tion.
LOSE THAT LEAN
AND HUNGRY LOOK
Women: 3 to10
CO-OP meals per day
Under $7 per week
E ~ Call 7211

-Daily-Roger Reinke
STUDENTS DEPARTED AT 9:13 A.M. YESTERDAY FOR WEEKEND OF FOOTBALL AND FUN

Part Five of 'U' Historical
Survey Finally Completed

By TOM ARP
Part Five of "The University of
Michigan-An Encyclopedic Sur-
vey" has recently been published
by the University Press.
This book, dealing with the his-
tory of the Medical School, the
University Hospital, and the Law
School, is one of nine sections of
the four volumes of historical
material to be printed by the Uni-
versity.
* * *
THE PUBLICATION of the his-
tory of the University was autho-
rized in ,1937 during the Centen-
nial celebration, and since then
the editorial office of the Univer-
sity Press has been working steadi-
ly toward the production of the
complete work.
The "Survey," when finished,
will be obtainable in nine paper-
bound sections or four cloth-
bound volumes.
Literary contributions have
come from the members of the
faculties of the various schools and
colleges, and are compiled and
edited at the University Press. The
Mi 51l

material has already been submit
ted, and only the work of putting
it into shape and publishing it re
mains.
THE UNIVERSITY pays for th
research and editing of the Sur-
vey, and the costs of publicatior
are covered by grants from alumn
and other interested persons.
The four other parts of the
"Survey" already published are
concerned with University ad-
ministration, organization and
services, alumni, and the literary
college.
The sixth, dealing with the grad-
uate, business administration, ed-
ucation, natural resources, and
music schools, is now at the pub-
lishers, and should be available in
the near future.
Wilfred Shaw, the editor of,
the "Survey," has made all the
etchings used in the work. In-
cluded are drawing of the cam-
pus buildings and portraits of
the University presidents. Shaw
was the originator of the idea of
publishing a history of the Uni-
versity

11 DAYS
'TIL
RUDIGORE
OPENS
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Copies of the five parts already
published are available for refer-
ence at the General Library and
the Michigan Historical Collec-
tions in the Rackham building.
They can also be purchased at
the University Press for $1.50 each
for the paper bound copies. Of the
proposed four cloth-bound vol-
umes, the first two are already off
the press. They sell for $3 each.

Uni versities Eye
New UMT Plan
g - -
- By JERRY HIELMAN
The nations' colleges and universities are eyeing with interest a
plan for six months compulsory military service for all 18 years olds
e which has been presented to Congress by the National Security Train-
ing Commission.
Congress is expected to approve or reject it at its next session.
Having promised to give the bill "priority" status, Congress will
probably act on it within 45 days after it reconvenes.
*: * * *
THE COMMISSION was set up under the Universal Military
Training amendment to the Selective Service Act last June. It was
empowered to investigate the feasibility of UMT and report back to
Congress. The advice which has been offered is the recommendation of
the five-man commission for immediate enactment of a plan which
would require all able-bodied 18 year old youths to undergo six full
months of rigorous military training.
Such a program, the commission said, should be so arranged
that it "would be extremely difficult to be deferred for any other
than mental or physical reasons."
As a result college deferments would be only to the end of the
academic year. Pre-professional students would be forced to com-
plete their terms of service before entering a professional school. The
commission would delay their service in the active reserve, however,
until after they completed their graduate training.
College educators consulted have agreed to make "reasonable"
adjustments in their schedules if they can receive assurance that the}
condition will be enduring and not just another in the endless series ofI
disruptive changes.
IN RECOMMENDING UMT, the report cited two reasons for
having such a program:
1). Such a program would indefinitely protect the United
States from overanxious aggressors by providing this country
with a large, permanent and well trained manpower pool.
2). The economic and social dangers involved in maintaining a
large standing force "ad infinitum" would be overcome. The pro-
posed UMT would provide a sufficiently trained force at a minimum
of cost. Discharged soldiers would be kept in shape by remaining in
the active reserve for a period of seven and a half years.
* * * *
THE IMMEDIATE enforcement of UMT is being held up by one
consideration, however. In order to maintain the present maximum
Armed Forces limit of 3.5 million men, the great majority of draftable
18 year olds will have to be taken into the regular services.
As a result, UMT, for the next couple of years at any rate, will
have to induct men at the expense of the regular armed forces.
The only way to avoid this would be to extend the period of
service of those already in the services.
The training plan calls for six months of uninterrupted service in
one of the branches of the Armed Forces. However, the trainees will
not be considered as regular members of the services,
They will not be required to serve overseas, will have their
actions and outside movements strictly supervised, and will re-
ceive lower pay than regular soldiers.I
It is planned that the Army would train about 50 per cent of
the total inducted, the Navy 28 per cent and the Air Force, 22 per cent.
NATIONAL REACTION to the plan has been generally favorable.
Donald R. Wilson, national commander of the American Legion com-
mended it and said that all 17,500 Legion posts would back it to the
hilt when it comes up before Congress early in January.
No action has been taken thus far by University officials.
It is expected that some provisions will be made to adjust to'its
possible affect upon University men.
It has also been pointed out that this bill may go the way of other
such attempts. Similar Congressional priority was given to Manpower
Bill last year, and no action was taken upon it until June.
But judging from the determination on the part of the commission
and President Truman, UMT promises to become a permanent fixture
in American life.

Events Today

Campus
Calendar

Conference - Robin Bond, Eng-
lish art educator, will speak at the
fall conference of the Michigan
Art Education Association, at 10
a.m. today in Rackham Amphithe-
ater. The meeting is co-sponsored
by the architecture college and the
Extension Service.
* * *
Play-A few tickets are still
available for the final perform-
ance of Ken Goldstein's 1951 Hop-
wood Award play, "Live on Air,"
to be presented at 8 p.m. today at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater. All
priced seascan be purchased at
Lydia Mendelssohn box office for
$1.75 and 50 cent rates.
* * *
Luncheon-The Father Frank J.
MacPhillips, of St. Mary's Catho-
lic Church will be the guest speak-
er at the Lane Hall luncheon-dis-
cussion hour at 12:15 p.m. today.
"You Can Change the World,"
will be the title of his address,
which will follow the serving of a
cost luncheon.
Coming Events
Conference - Attendance of
about 1,000 delegates is expected
at the 22nd annual Parent Educa-
tion Institute to be held at the
University next Wednesday and
Thursday, Nov. 7 and 8.
Recital - Robert Noehren, Uni-
versity Organist, will present a
fall series of three organ recitals
at the University on Wednesday
afternoons, Nov. 7, 14, and 21, on
the Frieze Memorial Organ in Hill
Auditorium.
CLEVELAND
ORCHESTRA

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-Everlasting Punishment.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.-Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
Ths room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P. M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev, Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin..

A

.,.

1 1

i

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.

Department

of Speech presents

a new modern tragedy
"LIVE ON AIR"
by Kenneth Goldstein
LAST PERFORMANCE TONIGHT 8 P.M.

Admission $1.00 - 75c - 50c

Box office open 10 A.M.-8 P.M.

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER

"me"

M

TODAY'S SPECIA

I

Pecan waffles,
country ham, and -
coffee
75c

t'
HUSTON
BURDETTE
Chef

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmole, D.D.
Walter S.Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Press "We Are God's Children."
0615 P.M.: Student Guild. The subiect for dis-
cussion will be "What Does the Old Testament
Have for Me?"
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Worship Service, with sermon by
the pastor, "The Untroubled Heart."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta-Lutheran Student
Club-Supper and Program. "The Cross in
Christian Symbolism."
Tuesday at 9:15: Social Hour,
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Betty Lou Jockwig, Associate Student Counselor
9:45 A.M.: College Class.
11:00 A.M.: Rev. Loucks, "Our Christian Cove-
nant."
6:00 P.M.: Prof. John Reed, "Sons of Roger
Williams."

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
Music: Wayne Dunlap, Howard R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: All Departments of Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship-Dr. Parr will preach
on "With Their Backs to The Temple."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild Supper at Memorial
Christian Church. Flora May Slosson will be
the speaker.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar, Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship "The Gospel of Mediocrity."
Dr. Large preaching.
4:15 P.M.: Bible Study Group, Green Room.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Rev. Bowld-
ing will speak on "Holy Obedience in a Divid-
ed World."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ),
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (Nursery for chil.
dren). Sermon: "The Earth Is the Lord's;'
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Paterson, Assistant
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 P.M. supper and 6:45
program. Guest speaker, Flora Slosson, former
Guild member and present student at Chicago
Theological Seminary.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Student Center-Corner of Hill & Forest
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion & Trinity
Churches
5:30 P.M.: LSA Supper Meeting at the Center-
Program at 7:00.
Tuesday-
7:30 P.M.: Discussion at the Center-"What Do
We Believe About God?"
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
218 North Division St. Phone 2-4097
Rev. Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Rector: The Rev. Henry Lewis S.T.D.
Curate: The Rev. Ellsworth E. Koonz
Chaplin: The Rev. Bruce H. Cooke
8:00 A.M.: Holy communion.
9:00 Holv communion followed by student break-
fast, Canterbury House.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Holy communion. Service by Rev.
Ellsworth Koonz.
12:30 P.M.: After Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club. "Miss Margaret
Culley" Diocesian Oirector, Christian Educa-
tion, Speaker.
6:30 P.M.:kHigh School Club.
6:45 P.M.: Service in Cristian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
Wednesday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion, Stu-
dent Breakfast.

/

Jelly omelette,
French fries,
and coffee

95c

... LIBERTY AT FOURTH

AA Homecoming
Ann Arbor High School's first
homecoming is being celebratedI
this weekend to encourage alumni
participation in backing the team.
Folowing the game between Jack-
son and Ann Arbor a dance will be
held at Stenson Jr. High School
gym from 8 to 12 p.m. today.

ARE
COACHES
IN ON TH E
RASKETBALL
.F IX?/
j Read Startling

Sun., Nov. 4 at 8:30
HILL A UDITORIUM
PROGRAM
"~Tragic" Overtre BRAS..BAH
Divertincnto for Strings BARTOK
ELin Hel/denleben" . . .. STRAUSS

George Szell, Conductor

AQUARIUMS -A ideal cowepIatinal piece.
See our live tropical fish display this weekend

I TICKETS (Tax exempt) :
$2.50-$2.00---$1 .50
at University Musical Society
, , T . A A A I

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D. Pastor Emeritus
John Bathgate, Minister to Students
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
4:30l A AM.: Smina-r in Relgion Revre.nd John

11

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