100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 28, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILX

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1951 PAGE THREE

PROFESSOR'S HOBBY:
Legacy of Toy Soldiers
Willed to Army ROTC

U' Officials Deplore Local Movie Dearth

i

By DIANE DECKER
The unusual hobby of a former
journalism professor has become
a novel and useful legacy for the
University ROTC unit.
At the death of Prof. Donal H.
Haines last summer, his collection
Lonely Sailors
Ask TU' Coeds.
To SendMail
Two lonely American sailors,
now serving somewhere in Korea,
have appealed to University coeds
for mail.
"All our previops acquaintances
seem to have f'orgotten us," dental
technicians Charles E. Trout and
Fred G. "Griedenberg have written,
"and we find ourselves returning
empty handed from mail call after
mail call."
PICTURES WILL also be grate-
fully accepted, the two servicemen
said. They guarantee responses
to the letters.
Interested women may write to:
Charles E. Trout, 805-16-53
Fred G. Griedenberg, 522646
Dental Tech-USN
1st Medical Battalion-dental
clinic,
1st Marine division-FMF-
Pacific
c/o FPO-San Francisco, Calif..
Fall Technic
Sale To Begin
The October issue of the Michi-
gan Technic will go on sale to-
morrow in the West Engineering
Arch.
Sales will continue through
Tuesday. The' Technic, featuring
scientific articles and reports of
engineering research, is published
monthly by and for engineering
students. -

of over 2,000 toy soldiers, repre-
senting many nations and dressed
in the garb of varied historical
periods, was given to the Army
ROTC here. .
* * *
HAINES STARTED his collec-
tion as a boy with an accumula-
tion of original lead soldiers. From
this beginning, he made molds and
began to manufacture his own
copies, dressing them in authentic
costume. Colonel Charles Wiegand,
head of the University ROTC unit,
said that many are designed from
photographs and are exact repli-
cas.
In addition to building up his
collection, Haines devised a
"game of war which covered
his entire basement. He kept
careful records of battles and
simulated the maneuvers of both
present and past armies.
Among the most interesting
items in the collection are modern
reproductions of the soldiers of
Afghanistan and Abyssinia. Col.
Wiegand's favorites are the sol-
diers representing the French dur-
ing the Seven Year's War.
The soldiers will be used for ex-
hibition. They also provide a
means of demonstrating combat
formations in the classroom.
Union iTheatre
Trip Planned
The Union student offices have
made arrangements for 80 stud-
ents to journey into Detroit Fri-
day to see the hit Broadway play,
"Death of a Salesman."
,The price of this first theatre
excursion 'of the year will be $3.90
including bus transportation and
reserved tickets, with the buses
leaving the Union for Detroit at
6:45 .p.m. Friday.
Reservations may be made be-
tween 3 and 5 p.m. in the Union
lobby or by calling Ron Kaminsky,
'54, staffman in charge, at 3-8508.
Garg To Emerge
Gargoyle, the University's al-
leged humor magazine, will be out
with the witches Wednesday.
Peg Nimz, '53, claims the mag-
azine will be the best ever. But,
then, she's the managing editor.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

A University administrator and
an English professor yesterday WHEN MEMBERS of the facul-
deplored the lack of an experi- ty were requested a few years ago*
mental theatre and cinematic fa- to submit suggestions for a mem-
cilities for making and showing orial to the men who were killed
films here on campus. in the last two world wars, Prof.
"I'd like to see something better Mueschke suggested a little thea-
than the typical entertainment tre and full cinematic equipment
now available in Ann Arbor, Prof. plus a cinematic library to circu-4
Paul Mueschke, of the English de- late films throughout the state to!
partment said yesterday. high schools and colleges.
"We should become a center
for the distribution of drama.
Third Q uarter tic films which we ourselves
make here at the center," Prof.
Repors I'orce Mueschke said.
Re orts Force Although he agrees that Phoe-
nix, the project that was eventu-
St c s Ioallowy chosen, is a. worthwhile one,
IV1I Prof. Mueschke hopes that "when
The stock market had its big-
gest weekly drop last week since H ateher Calls

we get enough feathers in the
Phoenix'' we will undertake such
a project as he has suggested.
"I'm convinced that we should
have and that we shall have a
little theatre and cinematic facili-
ties such as I have described, in
the near future, Prof. Mueschke
concluded.
DEAN OF WOMEN Deborah
Bacon pointed out that "what
Ann Arbor needs is a little thea-
tre to bring in good foreign films."
"A theatre with a seating capa-
city of about 500 people would be
ideal." she suggested. "Something
about the size of Lydia Mendels-
sohn would provide a constant
audience for good films of which
there is a remarkable dearth in
Ann Arbor," Dean Bacon added.
Both the Cinema Guild and
the Gothic Film Society are do-
ing an excellent ,job, she said.
There is a tremendous risk en-
volved, however, in scheduling
such films for Hill Auditorium,
while theatres are generally too
small."
"We must be careful though to
avoid treading on the toes of local
theatres who are making an ef-
fort to import good films," Dean
Bacon warned.

SIGMA NU'S DISPLAY PLACED FIRST IN THEN
GO JUNIOR BIRDMEN:
Moon Excursion Possibilities
Foreseen by 'U' Astronomer

By HELENE SIMON
A thin aluminum cover on a
rocket ship would protect it from
collision from meteors, thus elimi-
nating one of the hazards of space
travel, a noted astronomer sug-
gested at the First Annual Sym-
posium on Space travel at the
Hayden Planetarium.
"Although it is impossible at
the moment to send rocket ships
to the moon, with hard work and
money that day may not be far
off," Stanley P. Wyatt of the as-
tronomy department declared.
"A ONE-WAY trip to the moon
is within the resources of present
day engineering, but before it will
be possible for people to make the
trip new inventions will have to
be devised,"he added.
Wyatt described what such a
trip would be like.
"It would be convenient to make
the trip during spring vacation,
for it would take four' days to get
to the moon," he said. The best
place to leave from would be a
mountain top on the equator, be-
cause the earth rotates fastest at
the equator, and by taking off

from a mountain top much of
atmosphere would already
passed through.
* * *

the
be

-Daily-Al :Held
MEN'S DIVISION
Guild Names
18 Sponsors
Cinema Guild has aninounc-
ed the 18 campus groups se-
lected to co-sponsor movies for the
rest of the school year. The or-
ganizations were selected from 27
who petitioned on the basis of
relative financial need.
Co-sponsors will be: Hillel, Rifle
Club, Central Pep Rally Commit-
tee, Sociedad Hispanica, Inter Co-
operative Council, UNESCO Coun-
cil, Sigma Delta Chi, Inter-Frater-
nity Council, Panhellenic Council,
Graduate Student Council, Can-
terberry Club, Anthropology Club,
Young Democrats, Business Ad-
ministration Council and the Eng-
lish Council.

the week following the start of
the Korean war in June, 1950, the
Associated Press reported yester-
day.
The market had been on the
advance from June of this year.
until the middle of October, but
yesterday the AP average showed
that 49.6 per cent of that gain
had been wiped out.
PROFESSOR Douglas A. Hayes,
of the School of Business Admin-
istration commented that the de-
cline is a result of two factors:
a normal reaction from the mid-
October high point and the bad
earnings reports being published
by most companies for their third
quarter and nine months periods.
News of the slim Tory victory
in England failed to produce a
bouyant effect on the market
which declined Friday, the day
election results were posted.
Bethleham Steel and General
Motors had very poor third quar-
ter reports with GM profits cut in
.half for this period as compared
with last year. However, oil stocks
reporting much improved earnings
were not exempt from the decline.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

STUDENT
SUNDAY NIGHT SPECIAL

Staff Meeting
President Harlan H. Hatcher
has called a special meeting of the
general faculty, including teach-
ing assistants and fellows, in or-
der to extend his greetings to them
and discuss matters of "funda-
mental importance to the Univer-
41ty."
The meeting will be held at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in Rackham lecture
hall.

- - t.2t.VV QV~-

TEN MINUTES would be re-
quired for the space ship to reach
the desired speed-seven miles a
second. During this acceleration
period the people in the ship would
weigh four times their original
weight.

TENDERLOIN SANDWICH PLATE
FRENCH FRIES, SALAD, COFFEE
$1.50
SERVED 5:00 P.M. TO 8:00 P.M.

ii
I

*I

4

Breakfast Special
Tomato juice, bacon, C
egg, toast, coffee
We deliver anywhere, anytime
Phone 8073
South Division at Liberty
OPEN SUNDAY MORNINGS
Doily 7 A.M. to 1 A.M.

The travelers would have to
be strapped to their seats, or
else they would float freely in
space, because their weight
-now would be zero.
Eating would present another
problem. Solid foods like toast
wouldn't be too hard to eat, but
any crumbs that might drop
wouldn't drop but continue to
float around.
The only way to make a landing
on the moon would be to turn the
rocket ship around, put forth a
blast of power, and land it on its
tail.
The whole idea of a journey to
the moon may seem far-fetched
now, but, Wyatt says, "It will
come someday."

J
J
i
I '
t
{
t 1

I

m
r- -=

MONDAY and TUESDAY ONLY

#aI'tth9 ?e4 taiuig tt
LIBERTY AT FOURTH

- .,1

.T

A

4

AP

Ii

on South University Avenue

. ....

manomwmml

+1/

Y
t
Y

End-of-Month
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday
Here are just a few of the
Money Saving Values.. .

1~

" :;ip t%? . $:2 :.
i~: >%N

For those cold days ahead -
$2.50 value Sweat Shirts
$1.59 each - 2for $3.00
COLORS: White, Gray, Red, Maize and Blue
The P-X 1313 S. UNIVERSITY
"The biggest little store in the world"
Men's Shoes
Reg. Pricedb$12.95 and $13.95
slashed to $995
FILECCIA BROS.
SHOE STORE & REPAIR SHOP
1109 S. University - Opposite Ann Arbor Bank

FREE!
Get-acquainted with WILSON'S delicious and nutritious
ice cream. FREE one pint o fraspberry ripple ice
cream with each pint purchase of your favorite ice cream.
WILKE DRUG CO.
1101 S. University Ave.

Only 27 Genuine Cowhide
BOSTON BAGS

$12.00 value

6 95

plus tax

Ulrich Book Store

at 39 95
Beautifully tailored 100%
WOOL SUITS - choose
from gabardine, checks,
plaids, menswear flan-
nels--original value to
65.00 . . . Sizes 9-15,
10-38.
6 FALL and WINTER
COATS-originally were
59.95 to 79.95.

at 199'

Group of

RAYON SUITS

with a wonderful wool
look--som are lined in
gabardine-checks and
stripes. Sizes 9-227/2.
..Originally 22.95 to
39.95.

GARDENIA IN BOWL
98c
CASH AND CARRY
MONDAY ONLY
As long as supply lasts
1122 S. University

9 4A a
' '

ALL SIZES-reg. 79c
Special Monday and Tuesday..

LADIES
Non-run rayon Brief Panty

l,.

59C

4

Group of BETTER DRESSES
. .. wool jerseys, better
corduroys, rayon crepes,
failles, taffetas. Origin-
ally to 35.00. Sizes 9-
15, 12-44, 122-242.
at 500
BLOUSES-wool jersey and
rayon crepe, long and

{$ :
t

t1

.i ,
". ,}
;f
l ,F .'6
;'
..d-% .

3-Piece PEN SET

at 10Oo

DRESSES-Corduroys,

f

les, taffetas in all
shades. Sizes 9-15,
44, 121/2-24 2.

fail-
fall
10-

Fabulous faille in a strapless charmer with an em-
broidered and beaded bodice, detachable straps. The'
jacket adds the much wanted cover-up look of the'
current season. Sizes7.15
$1691

Carlson Pharmacy
1112 South University

$3.00 Value'

- .

$149

BLANCETTS
1111 So. University Ave.
Sale.
Wool Jersey Dresses
Reg. $19.95 Values 45a*
Several styles. Beautiful fall colors. SIZES 10 to 16.
(tn// wI/ed £ Ai
1116 South University Ave.

short sleeves.
SKIRTS-corduroys, plaids

4

I

Group of BETTER SKIRTS

One Group

} 1

If

III

r-% i . 1 1 1'

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan