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September 20, 1951 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-20

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

ANNUAL CAMPUS EVENT SALUTING SENIORS:
Women Vie for Honors at Traditional Lantern Night Sing

Freshmen Coed Requirements
Include Year of Sports ACtivit
Classes To Be Offered for Four Seasons
On Beginner, Intermediate Skill Levels

I

* * *

* *

* * *

Winning House Group
Given Choral, Posture
Sports Activity Cups
There are many traditional
events which take place on the
University campus, and one of
these is the annual Lantern Night
Sing.
This program,,honoring gradu-
ating senior women, is presented
by the Executive Board of the Wo-
men's Athletic Association.
LANTERN NIGHT, as it has
come to be known on campus, i
an outgrowth of a program which
originated in 1913.
This event was a women's field
day on Palmer Field, and all
coeds took part in various races
and other activities. Later class
stunts were participated in.
The first line of march took
place around Palmer Field in 1932.
From this parade came the tradi-
tion of Japanese Lanterns and
hoops, which is responsible for the
name Lantern Night.
SENIORS CARRIED the lan-
terns in the procession, while the
junior women were provided with
hoops through which the fresh-
men jumped.
At the close of the program
the senior women who had led
the line of march, presented
theier lanterns to the juniors
who in turn gave their hoops
to the sophomores.
From this origin came Lantern
Night with allhits traditions and
spirit, although the actual pro-'
gram has gone through several
variations to become what it is to-
day.
* * * .
UNTIL THIS YEAR, festivities
began with the traditional line of
march of all women students to
Hill Auditorium. The march was
dispensed with this year and the
event began in Hill Auditorium,
where a skit showing festivities of
the past, was put on before the
singing.
In the past the Michigan
Marching Band led the parade
from Angell Hall around the ori-
ginal "40 acres" of the Univer-
sity campus to the "mall" in
front of the League.
Following the band were the
senior women dressed in their
caps and gowns. Marching behind
in order to escort the seniors to
the sing were the junior women,
wearing yellow bows in their hair
to distinguish them from the
sophomores with red bows and
freshmen with green bows.
* *-*
AFTER THE procession, the
main event of the evening took
place. This part of the program
was the beginning of festivties this
year. Choral groups from wo-
men's residences participate In a
program of singing competition in
Hill Auditorium.
The chorus giving the best
singing performance is awarded
the first place cup, which has
been won by Alpha Phi, Mosher
Hall and Alpha Delta Pi in re-
cent years. The recipient of the
award this year was Kappa Kap-
pa Gamma.
A cup is also given to the wo-
men's choral group having the best
posture while singing. This award,
which was given for the first time
in 1948, is now held by Martha
Cook.
* * *S
WAA AWARDS provide the fi-
nal part of the Lantern Night pro-
gram. A cup is awarded to the
house having the highest partici-
ption in athletics and certificates
are given to the dormitory, sorority
and league house having the high-
est participation record in their
divisions.
This year Chi Omega received

the Participation Cup, and Helen
Newberry was honored with a
certificate for participation in

I -

I

INDIA ART SHOP
Importers
3530 MAYNARD STREET

Requirements for all women en-
tering the University have been
designed to help students develop
interest and skill in physical edu-
cation activities.
A year of physical education is
required of each freshman woman.
This period is divided into four
seasons, and one activity must be
taken in each of the four seasons.
* s *

I

The costume worn in activity
classes consist of white cotton
sport shirts, white or light blue
shorts, tennis shoes and ankle
socks. Slacks or jeans and sweat-
ers may be worn when the weather
demands.

j PERSIAN PRINTS
v BED SPREADS
Y DRAPES

to' WALL HANGINGS
i JEWELRY
s GIFTS

z#' JAPANESE PRINTS

ff=j _,

ANNUAL EVENT--Kappa Kappa Gamma is shown giving their winning performance at this year's
Lantern Night Sing in Hill Auditorium. Groups from nearly every coed residence on campus par-
ticipate in the traditional song festivities which are sponsored by WAA. Awards were also presented
to Martha Cook for the best posture during their performance and Chi Omega for the highest
f participation in athletics during the school year. Three cups and several certificates were awarded
to the winning houses.
Co-recreation Groups To Expand This Year;
Clubs To Include Dance, Outing, Ice Skating

ONE SEASON must be devoted
to rhythmic or dance activities
which include modern d a n c e,
square and social dance, American
country dance and folk dance. This
requirement is waived if training
or instruction has been received
prior to enrollment at the Univer-
sity.
Classes are offered on the be-
ginning and intermediate skill
levels. During the first season
of the fall the student may elect
one of the following activities:
archery, field hockey, golf, out-
ing, riding, soccer, tennis, volley-
ball, folk dance, life saving,
swimming or modern dance.
Square and social dance, Ameri-
can country dance, badminton,
basketball, fencing, figure skating,
life saving, modern dance, outing
or posture, figure and carriage
may be elected in the second fall
season.
* * *
FOR THE FIRST spring season
one of the following activities may
be selected: American country
dance, basketball, fencing, folk
dance, figure skating, life saving,
modern dance, outing, posture, fig-
ure and carriage, swimming or rec-
reational leadership, a course
which is continued for the entire
semester.
The second spring season of-
fers the following activities:
archery, fly and bait casting, life
saving, golf, lacrosse, outing,
riding, soccer, speedball, tennis,
modern dance or the continua-
tion of recreational leadership.
In order to determine her classi-
fication for the sports program,
each student is required to go
through a thorough health exam-
ination upon entrance to the Uni-
versity. The examinations for
freshman women entering in Sept.
are held at Barbour Gymnasium
during Orientation Week.
* * *
A PHYSICIAN and a physical
education staff member together
determine what limitations, if any,
should be placed upon each stu-
dent's physical education activi-
ties. The ratings which are given
indicate the intensity or the
strenuousness of the activity rec-
ommended for the student.

Come to
ANN ARBOR
with
Empty Suit Cases
Buy your College Clothing
in a favorite College Shop.
insure yourself of the latest
in Campus Fashions.

/ Ii- 7

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Co-recreation at the University
has grown by leaps and bounds
since it first began about four
years ago.
It started when the ballet and
modern dance clubs saw that men
were showing an interest in these
activities, so the clubs took them
in as members.
* * *
SHORTLY AFTER this, the ice
skating club began taking male
members, and in the fall of 1949
the folk and square dance club
followed suit.
With such a large number of
men in these clubs, the need for
co-recreational organization was
soon realized, and so the position
of co-recreation chairman was
created. The position was ob-
tained by the petitioning proce-
dure, and this chairman was on
the Women's Athletic Associa-
tion board.
Last spring, the first co-recrea-
tion chairman, Barbara Moly-
neaux, took a survey of all men
and women on campus in order
to find out what co-recreation
vlubs they would like most to have
organized. She found that outing,
tennis, and bowling were most in
demand.

tion board which is separate
from the WAA board. Instead of
meeting wit hthe WAA board as
they previously did, al Imana-
gers of co-recreation clubs now
meet with the co-recreation
chairman. The chairman serves
as the liaison between the WAA
and the co-recreation clubs.
Men on campus have shown such
increasing . interest in co-recrea-
tion that there are now five such
clubs: ballet, modern dance, ice
skating, folk and square dance and
the Town and Country Club. The

managers of the Town and Coun-
try and ice skating clubs are men.
Great plans are now being made
for the 1951-52 year. Bowling will
probably be the next activitiy to
be organized under co-recreation.
The board also hopes to take
over the system of volleyball and
badminton tournaments that the
women's physical education staff
have set up.
Next year the Town and Country
Club and other co-recreation clubs
may enjoy the facilities of the
University golf pourse and the
new clubhouse.

I' '
4

DEPARTMENTAL OFFER:
Physical Education Majors
EligibleTo join Interest Club

R CtC)iJS i'N
On ihe Campus

I 1 ' _ _ -____ _ ,

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Physical education majors and
minors have an excellent oppor-
tunity to further their interests
and activties by joining the Wo-
men's Physical Education Club.
This club has three purposes:
first, to provide an opportunity for
the development of leadership and
nrmnt the s irit of cooneration;

* pro * uu& e u*2 pII... pl) Ji.
second, to promote closer student-
AS A RESULT of this survey, faculty relationships and third, to
the outing club, which is now further the interests and activities
called the Town and Country Club, in the field of physical education.

was organized.
This year there is a co-recrea-
the division of houses with over
100 residents, while Adelia Chee-
ver took the certificate in the
division of under 100 residents.
Last year, eliminations were ini-
tiated to avoid the unnecessary
length of the Lantern Night pro-
gram. It is the usual procedure
that half of the group which par-
ticipates in the eliminations is se-
lected to participate in the annual
sing.
All entries in eliminations are
eligible to receive the posture cup.

IN ORDER to achieve these pur-
poses, the club has a great many
social functions as well as numer-
ous business meetings. Each year
they sponsor an all-campus facul-
ty tea, open houses in the Wo-
men's Athletic Building, and a
faculty banquet for the faculty of
the women's physical education
department.
Every other year the club
holds a play day for high school
students and one for college
students in the alternate years.
They have an opening picnic
each fall to welcome the fresh-

men and a closing picnic in the
spring to honor the seniors.
At the club's business meetings
they often have notable people in
the field of physical education as
their speakers. These meetings
are held in the Physical Education
Club's lounge which is located in
the basement of Barbour Gymna-
sium.
EACH FRESHMAN who joins
this club immediately acquires a
big sister, a sophomore who can
help her little sister and acquaint
her with the club's activities.
The Physical Education Club
puts out its own newspaper,
which usually contains an article
on a staff member, one on a stu-
dent and various news items.
Juniors and seniors have the
privilege of wearing the navy blue
blazer with the club's seal on it,
and the navy blue shorts and
white shirt.
Dr. Bell is chairman of the wo-
men's physical education depart-
ment,

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