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October 24, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-10-24

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i

WEDNESDAY; OCTOBER 24, 1951 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Tennessee

Rated

Number

One

in

AP

Grid

Poll

I M TALKING ...
Sy John Jenk46
IT'S HARD TO BELIEVE, mates, but complaints about the officiating
in the intramural touch football games are falling faster than the
autumnal foliage in Ann Arbor. The South Quad is so steamed up
over the situation that it has circulated a petition listing the alleged
grievances which it has experienced during the season's gridiron
activities.
Some of the gripes are real beauties. For instance, in the
Huber-Williams clash the Huber players complained to the ref-
eree that a Williams player was wearing heavy paratrooper boots.
The official took no action, and as a result Duane Pozzanza suf-
fered a head concussion for being in the path of one of these
boots.
There was no medical aid in the vicinity according to the Huber-
ites, which constitutes another source of irritation. If some partici-
pant were seriously injured out there on South Ferry Field he would
stand an excellent chance of making the supreme sacrifice for his
house, a thought which dampens the enthusiasm of the more realistic
players.
Confusion on the Gridiron
WHEN KELSEY HOUSE engaged the men from Michigan House in
a spot of football, the former asked the referee if a quick kick on
third down was permitted. The ref replied in the affirmative, so
Kelsey quick-kicked on third down. The Michigan team then pro-
tested the ruling, with the result that the game must be replayed
in the near future.
In the Anderson-Winchell tilt the referee decided that guards
were ineligible to receive passes. On another occasion a referee
blew the whistle "by mistake" as an Anderson House man was
skirting a Taylor House end. The lads from Taylor immediately
gave up pursuit and the Anderson back raced on to a touchdown.
The officials allowed the score.
Gomberg House complains that it was the recipient of some very
unsportsman-like conduct when it played Fletcher Hall. After a
Gomberger had legally tagged a Fletcherite returning a kick-off,
the latter threw the ball at the tagger, striking him in the heal.
Although this incident occurred in full view of both teams, substi-
tutes, and spectators, neither official saw the action, and no penalty
was inflicted.
Need for Better Refs
ALL THESE COMPLAINTS point out the fact that the referees could
afford to spend several hours learning the rules of the game and that
a more wide-awake attitude should prevail on their part. Here's to
'better officiating in the playoffs.
IM director Earl Riskey w'uld, like to announce that the
Sports Building will start opening at night on October 29. Volley-
ball will get started at that time for all divisions. A practically
unbelievable total of 125 teams will participate in this sport.
Because of the many requests, there will be unlimited substitu-
tion in the touch football playoff contests. This action should help
speed up some of the games according to some competent observers.
Riskey also announced that a new rule allows graduate students who
have not affiliated with a professional fraternity to play in the Inde-
pendent League.
A six team soccer league Is about to get underway with the de-
fending champions, the Chinese, taking on the Turks, Arabs, Ameri-
cans, Europeans, and South Americans. Senior Manager Morris Han-
"ek is in charge of this program..

PLAYER OF THE WEEK:
Peterson Excels

in Wolverine Victory

By HERB COHEN
When Michigan defeated Iowa
last Saturday, there were very few
people in the Hawkeye's stadium
who didn't have a good idea who
Michigan's player of the week was.
Don Peterson was the. almost
unanimous choice of fans and
sportswriters alike, as he led an
inspired Wolverine aggregation to
a most-needed 21-0 victory.
THIS WIN stamped Michigan
as a team to be watched thr6ugh-
out the rest of the season, for the
Wolverines showed the old time
conservative and powerful brand
The University Golf Course
will close for the season on
Sunday, October 28. All those
having material in lockers arc
requested to clear them and
turn in their keys.
--Bert Katzenmey er

* * *

of football which made them a
legend in the bygone days of Field-
ing H. Yost.
Chief man in that type of
football, of course, is the full-
back; and Yost did not have
many fullbacks better than Pet-
erson was last Saturday.
In last week's game Peterson ran
for a net 85 yards, completed 2 out
of 3 passes for 72 yards, and twice
quick kicked beautifully to keep
the vaunted Iowa attack bottled
up on their side of the field.
* * * *
ONE OF THESE completely baf-'
fled the Iowans and went for 54
yards from scrimmage as it trav-
eled out of bounds on the Iowa
nine yard line.
Besides this he scored two
touchdowns. One of these was
on an overpowering 21-yard gal-
lop on which he shook three
would-be Iowa tacklers.
This was by far the best per-
formance that Peterson has given
so far in a Michigan uniform, and
Vol Halfback
Places First
In Week's Poll
NEW YORK-()-Hank Lauri-
cella, sligit Tennessee tailback
who can run, pass and kick-and
do all three well-was named back
of the week yesterday in the
weekly Associated Press poll.
Lauricella did just about every-
thing you'd ask from a single wing
tailback in Tennessee's 27-13 win
over Alabama.
HE RAN 34 yards for the third
touchdown.
He passed to Bert Rechichar
for the Vols' first touchdown,
gaining a 7-7 tie at the half,
and completed four passes in
Tennessee's drive to the second
score.
He quick-kicked 75 yards to put
Alabama on the spot and aver-
aged 40.5 yards per boot..
OLLIE MATSON of San Fran-
cisco, Bobby Marlow of Alabama,
Charles McDonald of Texas A &
M, Pat Cannemala of Southern
California and Roger Zatoff of
Michigan all received votes as de-
fensive backs.
The latter pair were named
for their linebacking, and Zat-
koff spent most of last Saturday
afternoon sipwing down or step-
ping another back of the week
nominee, Bill Reichardt of
Iowa.
Another star nominated for
back of the week was Don Peter-
son of Michigan, who led the Wol-
verine backs to a 21-0 victory.

DON PETERSON
... makes the grade
* * *

ture at left half back. Koceski was
the same at right half. Dufek could
not be budged from the fullback's
position, and Bill Putich was do-
ing a very satisfactory job at quar-
terback.
So with no first string posi-
tion in sight, Don Peterson was
prepared by Oosterbaan to take
over as second-string right half-
back. Last season he performed
very admirably at that spot and
also occasionally at tailback and
fullback.
He was the kind of player who
could pass, and very adequately as
has been shown this year; he could
run, as he hasshown every year;
and he could even punt, as he de-
monstrated by his two beautiful
quick kicks last Saturday.
HE WAS THE TYPE of player
who could play anywhere, and so
when Oosterbaan found himself
SPORTS
HERB COHEN: Night Editor
with a problem at fullback, he log-
ically called upon Don Peterson to
fill the while.
Right from the start of the
season Peterson was exception-
ally adequate, if not brilliant,
as he ran and occasionally pas-
sed from the fullback slot.
But Iowa finally proved to all
concerned that Michigan had
found the fullback which the pre-
season experts so vierocously
claimed we lacked.

Knee Inj 'ry
May Bench,
RightHalf
The right halfback jinx visited
Michigan again yesterday, but the
extent of its damage this trip has
not been completely determined.
Tom Witherspoon, a leading
prospect to take over Wes Brad-
ford's wingback position when the
latter leaves for the army, was
helped off the practice field with
an injured knee.
WITHERSPOON SAID'his knee
popped out of joint, but he hopes
to be ready for Minnesota this
Saturday. He added that his con-
dition will be better determined
after testing the bad knee in prac-
tice today.
Witherspoon is the third
wingback to be sidelined this
season. Current number one
man at the position, Bradford,
has been drafted, but Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan figures he
will be available Saturday. The
150 pound scatback took his
usual part in yesterday's work-
out.
Originally scheduled for induc-
tion yesterday, Bradford h a s
gained time by transferring his
point of induction from Troy,
Ohio to Ann Arbor.
* * *
EARLIER THIS year Frank
Howell, at the time first string
right half, was put out of action
indefinitely with a cracked ankle
bone!
Yesterday's discouraging wea-
ther didn't discourage Ooster-
baan from putting the Wolver-
ines through a long practice.
In a heavy rain the Maize and
Blue concentrated mostly on de-
fense against Minnesota plays be-
ing run by the Junior Varsity.

NEW YORK-(IP)--Tennessee,
which took over the coveted No. 1
spot today in the weekly Associat-
ed Press football poll, stands a
good chance of staying on the top
rung the rest of the season.
The powerful Vols, voted the
team most likely to be No. 1 in
the AP's annual "crystal ball" poll
before the season, have ahalf-
dozen games left but. they're
against Tennessee Tech, North
Carolina, Washington and Lee,
Mississippi, Kentucky and Vander-
bilt.
* * *
NORTH CAROLINA jand Ken-
tucky, which seem to have found
the winning combination, could
cause trouble.
Tennessee thus finally made.
the grade after threatening for
three weeks. After the Vols
thrashed Alabama, 21-13, the
nation's sports writers and
sportscasters gave Tennessee 1,-
354 votes to 1,204 for second
place Michigan State.
Georgia. Tech polled 1,022 votes,
good for third place, while Illi-

Vols Overwhelming Choice;
Wolverines 21st in Nation

nois and Maryland filled out the
top five with 878 and 841. respec-
tively.
THE FIRST TEN
TEAM POINTS
1. Tennessee(70)..............1,354
2. Michigan State (28) ......... 1,'04
3. Georgia Tech (16)............1,022
4. Illinois (12) .................. 878
5. Maryland (13)................ 841
6. Southern California (13) . 11
8. Princeton (2)................ 528
9. California (1)...............435
10. Texas ........................ 132
SECOND TEN
11. Stanford (1)..................164
12. Cornell (1)...................131
13. Northwe tern...........,.....122
14. Wisconsin.................... 98
15. Notre Dame.................. 97
16. Texas A & M (1) ............ 91
17. Kentucky (1)................ 47
18. Washington State............ 381
19. Arkansas..................... 26
20. San Francisco................18
Others: Michigan and Oklahoma
14, Southern Methodist and Cincin-
nati 12, Rice and Mississippi 10, Col-
lege of Pacific and Pennsylvania 7,
ouisiana State and Washington 5,
Miami (Fla.), Texas Christian and
Tulsa 4, Clemson and Bueknell 3
Holy Cross and Colorado 2, Villanova
1.

A

Makes a Man Love a

Pipe

in a way it partially fulfilled a
prophecy made by his brother Tom
when they were both members of
the Wolverine football squad.
The elder Peterson foresaw a
bright future for Don, and
"brotherly love" must not have
been the whole story.
Not until last weekend, how-
ever, was this faith fully justi-
fied.
Don. Peterson was switched from
one position to another in the
'M' Club meeting 7:30 to-
night in 'M' room at Yost Field
House. Pictuers for Ensian will
be taken.
-Bud Holcombe
backfield. Coach Bennie Ooster-'
btan realized his great value to
the team, but he could not find
a permanent nosition for him.
CHUCK ORTMANN was a fix-
Leo Durocher
Named Year's
Top Manager
NEW YORK - ) -- Leo Duro-
cher, whose job was thought to be
in jeoparV|y when his New York
Giants slithered through a sicken-
ing 11-game losing skein at the
start of the season, was voted yes-
terday baseball's "manager of the
year."
The colorful, controversial little
field leader won the coveted award
for leading the Giants to their
first pennant since 1937 in the
most sensational race in National
League history.
* * *
THE GIANTS, last in May and
13%/2 games behind the Brooklyn
Dodgers as late as Aug. 11, cli-
maxed an amazing surge to the
top by defeating the Dodgers, 5-4,
in the final of a three-game post
season playoff on Bobby Thom-
son's three run homer in the last
of the uinth lining.
Durocher :;Iined the honor in
an Associated Press poll con-
ducted among 187 members of
the Baseball Writers' Associa-
tion of America. He bagged
113 votes to almost double' the
+4 total rung up by runner-up
Casey Stengel of the World
Champion New York Yankees.
Stengel won the award in 1950.
Only four others received recog.
nition. Al Lopez of the Cleveland
Indians and Paul Richards of the
Chicago White Sox, both serving
their first seasons as big league
managers. They got four votes
each. Jimmy Dykes of the Phi-
ladelphia Athletics a n d 1,;arty
Marion of the St. Louis Cardinals
were named on single ballots.

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