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October 23, 1951 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1951-10-23

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1951

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LUXURY AT LAST:
River Voyagers Reach
New Orleans in 95 Days

NEW ORLEANS -(')- The
four crewmembers of the raft "Le-
thargia" enjoyed the luxury of hot
food and modern plumbing yester-
day after 95 days of roughing it
down three rivers.
The rafters, two men and two
women, all single, ended their
18,000 mile trip at 3:30 p.m., Sun-
day after floating down the Al-
legheny, Ohio and Mississippi
Rivers from New Kensington, Pa.
* * *
THE GIRLS, Mary Ellin Mc-
Crady, 24 year-old sociology grad-
uate of the University, and Ger-
aldine Garcia, 24, a Boston com-
mercial artist, were met by their
mothers when the crude 12 by 24
foot raft pulled up at the foot of
Canal Street.
The foursome, suntanned and
frazzled, were met by the press
and about 200 onlookers but
Newsmen Will
Go on Trial,
JudgeRules
LAKE CHARLES, La.-(P)-New
Orleans Judge J. Bernard Cocke
ruled yesterday he and a special
prosecutor have the right' to try
the cases of five crusading news-
papermen accused of defaming 16
public officials and three admitted
gamblers.
Judge Cocke overruled motions
filed by the newsmen's attorneys
questioning the legality of his ap-
pointment by the Louisiana Su-
preme Court to handle the cases
as a visiting judge. -
Cocle also overruled motions
challenging the right of Assistant
Attorney General M. E. Culligan
to prosecute the cases for the local
district attorney.
Defense Attorney Clement
Moss immediately gave notice
that he would ask the State Su-
preme Court to review Cocke's
decisions on the motions. If
these writs are granted, the ar-
raignment of the newspaper-
inen, reset for next Monday,
would be postponed again.
T h e newsmen are Thomas
ShearmanPublisher of the Lake
Charles American Press, his son,
W±.'iam Hugh Shearman, Co-Pub-
lisher; Kenneth Dixon,, Managing
Editor; City Editor James Norton,
and Carter George, Police and
Court Reporter.
-ENDS TONIGHT--
Monte Woolley
"AS YOUNG AS
YOU FEEL"
Plus
Humphrey Bogart
"SIROCCO"
WEDNESDAY
THRU SATURDAY
with MVYN DOUGLASN
Plus
RONALD RHONDA
REAGAN - REMING

I

were overlooked by New Or-
leans officialdom.
On shore the mothers met for
the first time Don Brown, 24, of
Detroit, and Milton Borden, 30, of
New Bedford, Mass., the men on
the crew.
* *I *
MRS. JAMES Domingos, wi-
dowed mother of Mary Ellin who
works in the Department of Agri-
culture at Washington, said she
had not objected to the unchaper-
oned junket.
"Mary Ellin is a very open and
frank person," she said. "I've
never worried a minute about
that, just their safety. I was so
relieved when I heard two men
were going. At first she wanted
to make the trip with just girls."
Mrs. James Harney, Geraldine's
mother, said she objected to the
trip at first because of the danger
but not because it was unchaper-
oned.
"Honey, I'm so proud of you,"
Mrs. Domingos told her daughter
when she stepped ashore.
THE QUARTET, practically
strangers when they started the
three month's trip, planned to
spend a few days here sightseeing
before going their separate ways.
Brown said he would return
to the University next term after
a visit to his home in Detroit.
Mary Ellin plans to return to
Washington with her mother.
Geraldine will head back to Bos-
ton and Borden will take up du-
ties of a new forestry job in
North Carolina.
The fate of the raft-a wood
pile on oil drums-has not been
decided. It may be sold here, the
foursome said.
Originally, the cruise was billed
as a sociological experience in
close quarter living. Before the
trip ended, the crew said it was
made "just for fun."
Bus Ad Club
ElectsOfficers
'"The Industrial Relations Club,
an organization of business ad-
ministration students, has held its
first meeting and elected the fol-
lowing officers:
Garth Kirkindall, Grad., chair-
man; Bill Marcou, Grad., vice-
chairman; Richard Long, Grad.,
secretary - treasurer; and Rod
Lamm, Grad., program chairman.
The club presents everyday
problems of labor and manage-
ment to students who are proper-
ly prepared to evaluate them. This
is done through a series of dis-
cussion groups conducted by re-
presentatives from all levels of
management, labor, and govern-
ment.
The organization considers pos-
sible solutions to all problems pre-
sented.
Wolverine Club
An open meeting will be held by
the Wolverine Club at 7:15 p.m.
today at the League.

Peace Must
Attract Poor
Man--Lubin
"The United Nations must make
peace attractive to the impover-
ished peoples of the world by im-
proving their living conditions,"
Isador Lubin, declared here yes-
terday.
Lubin, U.S. representative to the
United Nations Economic and So-
cial Council pointed out that the
world's one billion "backward' in-
habitants will have little interest
in the maintenance of peace if'
their primary concern is the fight
against starvation.
* * *
ECOSOC, WHICH consists of
eighteen countries representing
different geographic regions and
stages of economic development,
fulfills its task in various ways, he,
said. It may utilize the facilities
of other UN organizations like
the World Health organization, as
it did in the Egyptian cholera epi-
demic of 1948, or it may create
special groups like the Arab Refu-
gee Organization.
Besides tackling immediate
problems, it carries out its poli-
cies by formulating treaties that
would permit the unrestricted
transfer of news throughout
the world and pacts that would
guarantee fundamental civil
rights to the citizens of the
signatory, Lubin added.
So m e of ECOSOC's better-
known activities, Lubin said, in-
clude its supervision of the Inter-
national Refugee organization,
which has moved close to a mil-
lion refugees out of Europe, and
the recently founded Korean Re-
construction Agency.
* * *
Lubin, who is the United States
representative on the Agency's
advisory committee, emphasized
that the work done by the Korean
Reconstruction Agency affords a
good example of the way ECOSOC
carries out its aims. For if the
Korean people have nothing left
after the war but burnt homes
and ruined factories, we cannot
expect possible future victims to
fight against aggression, Lubin
concluded.
Economic Expert
To SpeakToday
John A. Loftus, Economic Ad-
visor to the Assistant Secretary
for Near Eastern, South Asian and
African Affairs, Department of
State, will speak following a
luncheon at noon today in the
Union.
Speaking on "Economic Devel-
opments in the Middle East"
Loftus will address the League of
Women Voters. The public is in-
vited to attend the lecture.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

is

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University s
of Michigan for which the Michigan c
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-t
bility. Publication in it is construc-c
tive notice to all members of thes
University. Notices should be sentI
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room9
2552 Administration Building before
3 p.m. the day preceding publicatione
(11 a.m. on Saturday).-
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1951 I
VOL. LXII, NO. 25t
Notices'
Women Students: Making up time
for lateness may not be done on a late
permission evening, but must be done
on a 12:30 permission night.
Interviews: ,
Representatives of the Lockheed Air-
craft Corp., Burbank, California, will1
interview Aeronautical and Electricali
Engineering students in the Aeronau-E
tical Dept. today and EngineeringE
Mathematics, Mechanical and Civil En-
gineering students in the MechanicalI
Engineering Department tomorrow. SignF
up for appointments on the MechanicalI
Engineering bulletin board near roomi
225 W. Engineering Building or see Mrs.i
Stevens in the Aeronautical Engineeringc
Department, 1079 E. Engineering Bldg.N
Representatives of Bell Aircraft Cor-
poration Helicopter Division near Fort1
Worth, Texas wil linterview Aeronauti-
cal, Mechanical, and Electrical Engi-
neering students In the Aeronauticalc
Department on Wed., Oct. 24. Sign
schedule on the bulletin board oppo-
site 1079 E. Engineering Bldg.
Mr. R. A. Howard of Chance Voughtj
Aircraft, Dallas, Texas, will interviewa
Aeronautical, Mechanical, Electrical
and Civil Engineers, Electronics, Mathe-
matics and Physics students on Thurs.1
and Fri., Oct. 25 and 26 in the Aero-
natuical Engineering Department. Sign
schedule opposite 1079 E. Engineering
Bldg.
Representatives of Consolidated Vu-
tee Aircraft Corporation, Fort Worth,
Texas, will interview February and June
graduates of Mechanical and Civil En-
gineering Departments on Thurs., Oct.
25, in the Mechanical Department, and
Aeronautical and Electrical Engineering
students on Fri., Oct. 26 in the Aero-
nautical Department. Sign schedules
outside 225 W. Engineering Bldg., and
1079 E. Engineering Bldg.
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT
All students graduate and undergrad-
uate are notified of the following stand-
ards of conduct.
Enrollment in the University carries
with it obligations in regard to con-
duct, not only inside but also outside
the classroom, and students are ex-
pected to conduct themselves\in such
a manner as to be a credit both to
themselves and to the University. They
are amendable to the laws governing
the community as well as to the rules
and orders of the University and Uni-
versity officials, and they are expected
to observe the standards of conduct
approved by the University.
Whenever a student, group of stu-
dents, society, fraternity, or other stu-
dent organization fails to observe either
the general standards of conduct as
above outlined or any specific rules
which may be adopted by the proper
University authorities, or conducts him-
self or itself in sch a manner as to
make it apparent that he or it is not
a desirable member or part of the Uni-
versity, he or it shall be liable to dis-
ciplinary action by the proper Univer-
sity authorities. ("Bylaws," Sec. 8.03.)
Specific rules of conduct which must
be observed are:
Women Guests in Men's Residences:
The presence of women guests in men's
residenes, except for exchange and
guest dinners or for social events or
during calling hours approved by the
Office of Student Affairs, is not per-
mitted. This regulation does not apply
to mothers of residents. (Committee
on Student Conduct, January 28, 1947.)
Exchange and guest dinners may be
held in organized student residences
between 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. for week-
day dinners and between 1 p.m. and
3 p.m. for Sunday dinners, While
guest chaperons are not required,
groups without resident house directors
must announce these events to the
Office of Student Affairs at least one
day in advance of the scheduled date.
Calling Hours for women in men's
residences. In University men's resi-
dence Halls, daily between 3 p.m. and
10:30 p.m. In Nelson International
House, Psi Upsilon, Sigma Phi Epsilon,
Alpha Tau Omega Friday, 8 p.m. - 12
p.m.; Saturday, 2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
and from 8 p.m. - 12 p.m.; Sunday, 1
p.m. - 10:30 p.m. This privilege is
granted because of the presence of
the resident adviser or house director.
Intoxicating Beverages. The use or
presence of intoxicating beverages in
student quarters is not permitted.
(Committee on Student Conduct, July
2, 1947.) See Appendix C, "University
Regulations Concerning Student Af-
fairs, Conduct, and Discipline" for

Michigan Compiled Laws and Ordin-
ances of the City of Ann Arbor.

Concerted Absence. Concerted ab-
sence from an'y appointed duty by a
class or by any number of students
together will be regarded as improper
conduct, and those participating in
such action shall be liable to discip-
linary action by the proper University
authorities. ("Bylaws," Sec. 8.04.)
Financial Obligations. Proper observ-
ance of financial obligations is deemed
an essential of good conduct, and stu-
dents who are guilty of laxness in this
regard to a degree incompatible with
the general standards of conduct as set
forth in Section 8.03 (p. 29) shall be
liable to disciplinary action by the
proper University authorities.
Students shall pay all accounts due
the University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester of sum-
mer session. Any unpaid accounts at
the close of business on the last day
of classes shall be reported to the
Cashier of the University and the fol-
lowing action shall be taken: (1) all
academic credits shall be withheld, (2)
grades for the semester or summer ses-
sion just completed shall not be re-
leased, (3) no transcript of credits shall
be issued, and (4) students owing such
accounts shall not be allowed to regis-
ter in any subsequefit semester or sum-
mes session until payment has been
made. University authorities may re-
quest the withdrawal of any student
who through oversight has been al-
lowed to register contrary to this regu-
lation. ("Bylaws," Sec. 8.06).
Amounts due for room or board in
residence halls shall be deemed ac-
counts due the University. (Bylaws,"
Sec. 29.10.) S
Wheneversin the opinion of the Dean
of Students a case warrants it, like
action shall be taken in the case of
nonpayment of rent properly charge-
able for living accommodations for the
semester in an approved rooming
house.
Student loans wich a due during
any semester or summer session and
which are not paid or renewed are
subject to this regulation, but loans
not yetedue 'are not included. ("By-
laws," Sec. 8.06.)
Responsibility for Maintaining Stand-
ards of Conduct. Student organizations
are expected to take all reasonable
measures to promote among their mem-
bers conduct consistent with good taste
and to endeavor by all reasonable
means to ensure conformity with the
fore-going standards of conduct.
University students or student or-
ganizations are responusible for their
guests' compliance with tse standards
of conduct. (Dean of Students).
Any student-sponsored function at
which conditions arise that are injuri-
ous to the prestige of the University
may be abolished by the Committee on
Student Affairs. (Regents' Proceedings,
May, 1923.)
It is the joint responsibility of the
chaperons and the president of the
organization sponsoring a social event
to see that University regulations are
observed, particularly those relatingato
conduct, presence of women guests, and
use of intoxicants. (Committee on
Student Affairs, November 13, 1946.)
Bureau of Appointments' Registration
The Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information will hold a
registration for February, June, and
August graduates on Wed., Oct. 24, in
231 Angell Hall. This registrationis
for those persons who were not able
to register at last week's meeting and
who desire positions in business, in-
dustry and professions, and teaching.
Personnel Requests:-'
The Celanese Corporation of America
of Clarkwood, Texas, is in need of
Chemical Engineers with advanced de-
grees or Bachelor degree men with 4
to 5 years or more experience, and two
chemists. One of the chemist openings
requires either experience or training
in the field of physical instruments
and could be filled by a physicist with
a fair amount of Organic Chemistry.
The other chemist opening requires
either a Master's degree or a Bachelor's
degreeswith experience in Organic
Chemistry.
The New Jersey Machine Corporation
is looking forward for a recent, Febru-
ary, or June graduate Mechanical En-
gineer to train as a sales engineer, sell-
ing their products in states surround-
ing Chicago.
The Beech-Nut Packing Company is
in need of an organic chemist for their
food laboratory at Canajoharie, New
York. Applicants should be recent male
graduates with a degree in chemistry
and a good background of organic
chemistry.
For further information concerning
the above requests, contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building.
Lectures
Physics Lecture: First of a series of
six lectures on "Modern Theories of
Atomic and Molecular Structure." Sir
John E. Lennard-Jones, F.R.S., Profes-
sor of Theoretical Chemistry, Cam-

bridge University, England. 10 a.m.,
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-Lady's sweater. Owner may
claim by identifying. Call Dee Jen-
kins, 9434. )19L
FOUND - Lady's wrist watch. Owner
may claim by identifying. Call Mar-
ion Ohr, 9434. )20L
LOST-Six keys in dark brown case.
Call Ypsilanti 5010XW. )22L

FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m.
)1R
FACILITIES for banquets, parties, meet-
ings, dances, receptions, available at
American Legion Home. Ph. 6141. )5F
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
LARGE SINGLE ROOM-No landlord
on premises, refrigerator and hot plate
privileges. Close to campus, showers.
Call 2-7108 or 2-9410. )20R
HELP WANTED
APARTMENT AVAILABLE in exchange
for housework. Half mile from city,
to couple with car. No children. Phone
5092. )20H
BUSINESS SERVICES
KIDDIE KARE
RELIABLE SITTERS available. Phone
3-1121. )2B

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. Merrill's,
314 S. State fat. )3B
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Service
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Guaranteed
repair service on all makes of type-
writers. )4B
'TYPING-Experienced. Stencils, thesis
and term papers. 830 S. Main. Ph.
7590.
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
DIAMOND engagement and wedding
rings at wholesale prices. Ph. 2-1809
evenings. L. E. Anger, wholesale agent.
)40
TYPING-Technical papers, a specialty.
Phone 2-2308-after 6 p.m.
PERSONAL
GIRLS EAT WELL and inexpensively at
Osterweil Co-operative. Call 2-2218.
)8P

4

A

FOR SALE
MEN'S RUBBER HEELS-All typesa
styles. 65c Fast Service.
DE MARCO SHOE SHOP
322 E. Liberty

and
)41

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

M

CANARIES-Beautiful singers and fe-
males, parakeets and California lin-
nets. 562 S. 7th. Ph. 5330. ' )4
1949 ENGLISH FORD-Radio and heat-
er. 30 miles per gallon, in A-1 condi-
tion. $450. 109 Glen, Apt. 5. Ph. 2-8429.
)48
KODAK REFLEX II, Super Ikonta B.
3-0521 Ext. 637. )46
W h e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e
Until Oct. 31, special rates for every-
one to Cosmopolitan, Colliers, Holi-
day, Ladies Hm. Jr., Good House-
keeping, and Woman's Hm. Com.
Save by subscribing or renewing NOW.
Phone 2-8242 to inquire or to order.
Student Periodical Agency. )7
WHIZZER FOR SALE-Reasonable, call
3-0815, 12 to 1 or after 4:30 evenings.
FOUR WOMEN'S 10-carat gold ID brace-
lets. Values up to $30. $10 each.
Burr-Pats, 1209 S. "U".

SP

THE
STUDENT PLAYERS

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present
daa wa'R'

READ
and
USE
DAILY
CLASS IFIEDS

(

1w Directed by
Marn.P. Millar
)C) Q 10 2G
Lydia M ndelssohn Theatre
Orchestra $1.00, Balcony 74c

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EXECUTIVE
CAREERS
IN RETAILING
One-year Course
leads to
Master's
Degree

* Prepare to step into a responsible
executive position in the retailing
field: buying, advertising, fashion,
personnel. Specialized training, ex-
clusively for college graduates, covers
merchandising, personnel manage-
ment, textiles, store organization, sales
promotion, and all phases of store
activity. Realistic approach under
store-trained faculty. Classes are com-
bined with paid store work. Students
are usually placed before graduation.
Co-educational. Master's degree.
Limited enrollment. Write Admissions
Office for Bulletin C.

1951-52 LECTURE COURSE
presents
U.S. SENATOR
ESTES KEFAUVER,
"The Citizens Responsibility For Crime"
THURSDAY at 8:30
Tickets 1.50, 1.20, 60c (tax mci.)

Now On
Sale

HILL AUDITORIUM

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RESEARCH BUREAU FOR RETAIL TRAINING
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH . Pittsburgh13, Pa.

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READ THESE OUTSTANDING OPINIONS
ON WOLVERINE CLUB FOOTBALL TRIPS:
"These trips are the nuts" -Fred Beck
"Whoopee!" - Dagmar
"Save your money" -Michigan Daily
NOV..2-4... ILLINOIS (DAD'S DAY)

Weekdays 44c to 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
ENDING TODAY
Made for laughing purposes only Today and Wednesday
and most of your laughs
are "with" it!

GOTHIC
FILM-SOCIETY'S 1951-52 SERIES:
"DESERT VICTORY"British Documentary, 1942-3: OCT. 29
"THE GOLEM" German, dir. Paul Wegener, 1920: NOV. 26
"THE FRESHMAN" Harold Lloyd, 1925: DEC. 3
-plus: "Gertie the Dinosaur" First Animated Cartoon, 1909
"His Bitter Pill" Mack Sennett, 1916
"Sex Life of the Polyp" Robert Benchley, 1928
"The Skeleton Dance" Disney, First Sound Cartoon, 1929
"BOMBSHELL" Jean Harlow; dir. Victor Fleming, 1933: JAN. 28
"MOANA" Flaherty's Great Documentary, 1926: Feb. 4
"ANNA CHRISTIE" Greta Garbo, dir. Clarence Brown, 1930: FEB. 25
"CAMILLE" Garbo and Robert Taylor, 1936: MARCH 24
APRIL 14: Film to be announced
"FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE" Valentino, 1921: APRIL 28
"THE BLACK PIRATE" Fairbanks Senior's Best, 1926: JUNE 2
S MEMBERSHIP in the Society is by subscription only, at four dollars for the entire Series.

A4

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