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February 22, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-02-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIE

,.

PAGE THRIf .Y

Wolverine

Pucksters

Easily

Ice

Spartans,

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TRIPLE TANK TITLIST:
Taylor Sparks OSU Swim Champions
4 * a*6

By RODNEY COOK
When the Michigan swimming
team goes into action at the Wol-
verine varsity pool against Ohio
State Saturday, they will face a
team which has been unbeaten
in two seasons.
This Buckeye squad is stronger
than last year's team which scor-
ed an all-time high total of 93
points in the 1950 Big Ten
Championships.
* *
PROBABLY THE best reason
for OSU's recent dominance of
the Big Ten swimming scene is a
gentleman by the name of Jack
Taylor, a junior.
Taylor stroked his way to
k three first places in the last
Conference . meet, setting an
American record for the 1500-
meter free style in 18:58, a mark
which he later lowered by 20
seconds in the NCAA compe-
His other victories came from
the 150-yard backstroke in 1:33.4,
and a 4:45.5 440-free style victory.
THIS YEAR, Taylor has been
concentrating more on the back-
stroke, and it has already payed
off with a new American record
for the 100-yard distance in a
time of 56:4.
Ably seconding Taylor in the
backstroke events is Bill Son-

JACK TAYLOR
. *leading OSU performer
* * $
ner, Ohio State senior, who took
the 100-yard backstroke for the
Buckeyes last year in Confer-
ence championships.
In addition to this backstroke
strength, Buckeye Coach Mike
Peppe has maintained his year
after year stranglehold in the div-
ing competition.

Wakefield Offers To Play
'With Oakland for Free

SINCE 1937, Peppe has coached
eight national champion divers,
of which Hobart Billingsley, Char-
lie Batterman, and, greatest of
all, Bruce Harlan, are merely
three of the more distinguished
of a picked group.
This year, in spite of the gra-
duation of five senior divers
from last year's championship
squad, the Buckeye coach has
one of the best divers in the
country in -junior Joe Marino.
Marino placed second in the
high-board diving competition in
the 1950 Big Ten Meet. With more
experience, this year, he's even
better.
As a matter of fact, Marino is
probably the equal of Harlan in
the execution of his dives, al-
though the Buckeye swimmer is
not yet quite as effortless in his
entry as Taylor, the holder of 20
national titles.
M1ann Plans
Swim Tour
Of England
Matt Mann, Michigan's veteran
swimming coach, will return to his
native England this summer with
a group of both past and present
Wolverine natators in an exhibi-
tion tour -of the Islands.
In 1939 Mann was all set to
make a similar trip, but was forced
to cancel all plans when war broke
out in Europe only two days before
his cheduled departure.
HIS HOME TOWN of Leeds,
where he swam as a young boy
under the tutelage of his father,
will definitely be visited, as will
London, Brighton, Liverpool, Man-
chester, Birmingham, Sheffield
Newcastle, and also Edinburgh and
Glasgow in Scotland, among
others.
Most of the financial support
will come from England, espe-
cially from the Shiverers Swim
Club of Brighton, who are spon-
soring the tour, with the Uni-
versity's athletic department
strongly sanctioning the trip and
offering aid where needed.
The members of the visiting
squad will- also contribute to their
expenses, and official permits have
been granted by the National AAU
and the British Amateur Union.
Scheduled to leave on the Maur-
itania August 14 are freestylers
Matt Mann III, Wally Jeffries,
Don Hill, Tomn Benner, Burwell
"Bumpy" Jones and Rusty Carlis-
le; breaststrokers Stu Elliott and
John Davies; backstroker Bernie
Kahn and diver Alex Canja.

Bur ford Gets'Hat Trick'
To Pace Lopsided Win
Special to Tihe Daily
Michigan'spuckmen found Mich- his three goals for the evening at
igan State easy pickings last night 11:46 when Celley skated behind
and walloped the Spartans, 10-1, the Michigan State net and passed
in a game at the Demonstration out to Burford who knocked the
Hall Arena in East Lansing before puck in from about 10 feet out.
a small crowd of 1,200 people. Celley and Matchefts assisted
The issue was never really in Burford as he again tallied, and
doubt after Eddie May notched his Bob Heathcott and McKennell
first goal of the season to give tallied to make it 8-0 before
Michigan a 1-0 leaearly in the Connie Buck scored to ruin
first period. Downes' shut-out.
*i*s e McClellan and Burford added
THE SPARTANS were unable to late goals to run the final score to
muster any scoring punch, and 10-1. Burford and Celley each had
their defense was woefully inade- 4 points for the evening. Celley
quate. MSC goalie Del Reid was scoring once and Burford count-
peppered with 55 Wolverine shots ing 3 times.
during the course of the game, 10 TIcHeGN MC.sTAT
of which slipped through for goals. Downes.....................Reid
Hal Downes, on the other McClellan.,....RD........'Suarez
Heathcott.......LD........... Doyle
hand, handled only 16 Michi- Matchefts.................... Buck
gan State shots, and the Spar- Burford.........RW......... Brooks
tans did not tally until the Wol- Celley..........LW.........Revou
First Period Scoring: 1-Michigan,
verines had opened up a com May (Marmo), 3:51; 2-Michigan,
fortable 8-0 lead. Celley (McClellan), 10:44; 3-Michi-
The 10-1 final score does not gan, Keyes (unassisted), 17:08.
Penalties: Cragg, McClellan (2).
really indicate the fact that the Second Period Scoring: 4-Michi-
Wolverines did not try to run up gal, McKennell (Keyes), 1:03; 5-f
a big score against the Spartans, Michigan, Burford (Celley), 11:46;
6-Michigan, Burford (Celley, Mat-
conserving their strength instead chefts), 17:49; 7-Michigan, Heathcott
for an important two-game series (Burford), 19:07.
with the University of North Da- Penalties: May, Lord.1
kota in Ann Arbor this weekend. Third Period Scoring: 8-Michi-
* gal, McKennell (Keyes), 6:30; 9-
Michigan State, Buck (Revo), 1:10;
THE WOLVERINES jumped off 10-Michigan, McClellan (Matchefts,
to a 1-0 lead in the first period Celey), 13:11; 11-Michigan, Burford
when May pounced on a rebound (Keyes), 1627.
of Joe Marmo's long shot and tap- Penalties: feathott, Buck
ped it into the MSC net from about
5 feet out. NO HAPPY MEDIUM:
Seven minutes later Neil Celley
tallied oin an assist from Alex0
scoring for th first period whenF ast,
he scored on a solo effort to "
make it 3-0. Fail for 'M
The Wolverines picked up where
they left off early in the second
period when John McKennell scor- By GEORGE FLINT
ed on a beautiful drive in which Basketball is a funny game.
he streaked past two Spartan de- The way Michigan's cellar-
fensemen and rifled the puck high dwelling Wolverines play it, there
into the corner of the net past is less predictability involved in
Reid. the sport than in horse-racing or
* * poker.
GIL BURFORD got the first of * * *
IN THEIR last two contests,
Ernie McCoy's cagers played two
PCC Talks different types of basketball.
And the odd thing about it1
About Bowlis that if the styles of play had
been reversed, the Wolverines1
might well have won both ball
Pact Today games.
Against Michigan State, the
SAN FRANCISCO - )-(M- Whe- Maize and Blue tried to beat the
ther the Pacific Coast Conference Spartans at their own specialty-
will continue its affiliation with control basketball.
the Rose Bowl football game is * *
expected to be determined in im- THE SPARTANS were infinte-
portant meetings here today and Iy better at that type of play, and
Friday. the result was a slowly-played,
The time honored pact between workmanlike, 43-32 win.
the big far western college circuit Then came the Ohio Statej
and the Tournament of Roses contest, which was figured as
Association is the No. 1 item on one of the easy games on the
the agenda of the special sessions, conference schedule. The Buck-
* * * eyes are a fast-breaking ball
THE MATTER of continuing club. Michigan tried to run withl
the Rose Bowl set-up will be dis- them. Ohio State ran a bit fast-
cussed at the top level by presi- ter, and overcame a good lead1
dents of the member colleges. to take the clash.
Most of the heads of the nine Had the Wolverines played a
institutions are expected to be on fire-house brand of ball against
hand. the Spartans, a game which was
There was no indication in always in State's control might
advance as to the stand the have opened up and allowed the
prexies would take. Michigan cagers to shoot from
Renewal of the Rose Bowl pact close in, where they are much
between the Big Ten and the more effective.
Coast Conference also depends on : * *
the outcome of the forthcoming IF, ON THE other hand, the
meeting. The five-year agreement Buckeyes had been slowed down
between the two conferences end- by a control game in the second
ed with the bowl contest last New half of Monday's contest, they
Year's day although the actual might never have made the start-
contract will not terminate until ling succession of lay-ups, push

next June 1. shots, and rapid fire set shots

NEW YORK-(P)-A New York
grand jury yesterday plunged into
the greatest scandal' in collegiate
sports history, the multiple fix case
that has rocked big-time basket-
ball.
The jury bent to its task amid
persistent rumors-none confirm-
ed-that the alleged admissions
by eight cage stars of accepting
bribes to fix games is just the be-
ginning.
THE BROOKLYN Eagle said in
a story that three unnamed play-
ers from still another New York
school are jittery in anticipation
of being called on the carpet. The
eight stars thus far involved play-
ed for Long Island University, City.
College of New York and New York
University.
And there were other rumors
that the scandal was by no
means confined to the New York
area but might be festering be-
low the surface from coast to
coast.
Adding fuel to these unconfirm-
ed reports was a statement in Pe-
oria, Ill., today by a former Uni-
versity of San Francisco player,
Frank Kuzara. He said he and a
teammate, Don Lofgran, were of-
fered $1,200 to hold down the
points in a game last season with
the University of Southern Cali-
fornia.
KUZARA SAID AN unidentified

man telephoned him and Lofgran
and "asked how we would like to
make some money."
Both players shrugged off the
bribe offer, refused to accept
further calls from the would-be
briber and went ahead to help
their team whip USC. Both boys
since have left San Francisco.
San Francisco's former coach,
Pete Newell, said Lofgran told him
last summer of the purported brib-
ery attempt.
"THE BOY DIDN'T think much
of it at the time," said Newell, now
cage coach at Michigan State Col-
lege. "He hung up on the caller.
At first he thought it must have
been a joke."-
Newell said he knew nothing
of the purported bribe bid to
Kuzara.
The New York grand jury went
into session armed with business
records and books of Salvatore
P. Sollazo, the alleged brains be-
hind the latest explosive fix case.
* C * CC
SOLLAZZO IS ACCUSED of get-
Schedul e
Corrections
The following schedule lists time
corrections and an addition to 'This
Week in Sports' as printed in yester-
day's C"Daily."
SWIMMING
Feb. 24-Ohio State University at Ann
Arbor at 3:00 p.m.
WRESTLING
Feb. 24-Ohio State University at
Ann Arbor at 4:15 p.m.
GYMNASTICS
Feb. 24-Ohio State University at
Ann Arbor at 4:15 p.m.
TRACK
Feb. 23-Michigan State Normal at
Ann Arbor at 7:30, p.m.

SPORTS WORLD STILL ROCKING:
Latest Fix Rumors Involve West Coast

ting to Ed Gard, Long Island's
basketball captain last season, and
paying him to hold down the
points in three games.
Gard, in turn, is alleged to
have drawn into the fix three of
the top stars of LIU's present
team, LeRoy Smith, Adolph Bi-
gos and Sherman White.
The four players were said 'by
District Attorney Frank S. Hogan
to have admitted fixing seven
games-three last tear and four
this year-in return for $18,500 in
bribes.
* * *
IN ADDITION, Gard is accused
of acting as go-between for Sol-
lazzo in bribing Ed Warner, Ed
Roman and Al Roth, star of
CCNY's national championship
cage quintet, and Harvey (Connie)
Schaff, a leading scorer with NYU.
The eight players have admit-
ted taking $25,000 in bribes, Ho-
gan said.
Long Island University announ-
ced last night that, as a result of
the scandal, it was dropping all
intercollegiate athletics and can-
celling its remaining basketball
games.
TODAY, HOWEVER, Dr. T. W.
Metcalf, president of LIU, said it
was possible LIU might continue a
minor sports program.
Basketball has been the only
major sport at LIU since it
dropped football during World
War II.
Five other schools-big names
in collegiate basketball--also have,
pulled out of the Garden since the
scandal broke Sunday. They are
Bradley, Denver, Oregon State,
George Washington and South
Carolina.'

LAKELAND, Fla.-(P)-Outfiel-
der Dick Wakefield, one time $52,-
000 bonus baby of the Detroit
Tigers and last year a $17,000
player with Oakland of the Pa-
cific Coast League, said today
he'll play baseball this season
just for the fun of it.
"I don't want a salary and
won't take one unless there's
something in baseball law that
makes me," he insisted earnestly
in an interview.
* * *
HIS STATEMENTS constituted
it complete about-face on the sal-
ary question.
"I decided to do it last year
at the end of our season at
C Oakland," he explained. "I
went up to see Brick Laws
(Oakland Club president).
"I told him that I was one guy
he wouldn't have any trouble
signing for '51 . . . that I felt I
hadn't been given a real chance
in '50 but knew I could play good
ball.
"SO," WAKEFIELD continued,
"I said I would play for exactly
one dollar this season. He was

i
;
_,

surprised but we shook hands on
it and I haven't heard from him
since.
He said he has seen newspaper
reports that Laws sent him a con-
tract calling for a salary slice of
$12,000 from the $17,000 he re-
ceived under a big league pact
last year.
* * *
BUT, DICK insists, even $5,000
is too much.
"I am playing for nothing,"
he said again. "The dollar bill
is just to make the contract
legal. And I'm not counting on
any bonus at the end of the
year, either. Cash, I mean.
"If I have a good year and he
wants to give me a Cadillac or
something like that . . . okay."
* * *.
WAKEFIELD, sent to Oakland
last year by the New York Yan-
kees after he refused to go to
the Chicago White Sox, said he
thought maybe it would help "if
I don't have any money prob-
lems."
"By playing for nothing, it sure
ought to convince them that I'm
serious this time."

Slow Styles
Hoops ters
which spelled the Michigan de-
feat in the final period.
When the Wolverines did seek
to slow the tempo down, they
chose a highly questionable mo-
ment.
With the score 66-66, and a
minute and a half to go, Michi-
gan declined a free shot, took the
ball out of bounds, and stalled
with the intention of taking just
the one good shot.
THEY FAILED to get it, and1
the visitors grabbed lnoff-bal-
ance attempt by Leo anderKuy
which caromed off the boards in-
to the hands of a fast-breaking
Buckeye.
That was it-Ohio State cag-
ed a push shot and led by two.
The crux of the matter was the
free throw which the Maize and
Blue failed to take.
THEY HAD been converting,
charity tosses with more than
their usual precision, and had a
better than average chance to
make that one.
A one-point margin would have
put the pressure on the Buckeyes.
A tie game put the pressure on
nobody except 'the Wolverines,
who had to score to win in less
than overtime.

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Wolverine Wrestlers Wield Winning Ways

<4

By HERB COHEN
It's a fact that facts prove hy-
potheses, and if anyone were to
examine the statistics of the
Michigan wrestling team they
would be able to prove the hypo-
thesis that this year's team is one
of the finest to appear on the
Michigan athletic scene in years.
Larry Nelson, the team's -Migh-
ty mite at 123 pounds, is unde-
feated and untied. He has rolled
over nine foes and has won al-
most all of his matches by a con-
vincing score. The only oppon-
ent who has come close to beating
him was Manuel Macias of Iowa,
who finally succumbed 4-3.
~l~~wpexreel ell Innn
JACK GALLON, the team's
next man in the lineup has also
shown up extremely well. In nine
matches so far this year, Gallon
has been tied only once, while win-
ning eight. This tie occurred in
the Indiana meet where Dick Wil-
der, the "Hoosier" candidate at
'137 pounds, managed to pull out
a 5-5 tie.
The next grapples in the Wol-
verine setup is Joe Scandura,
who has wrestled most of the
year at 137 pounds. Here he
has compiled a record of four
wins and two losses, which is
very adequate for a man who
has had to work his way up into
a starting position.

Dave Space, the Michigan "mat
master" at 147 pounds, has lived
up to all of his potentialities. Last
year after Space had finished sec-
ond in the conference great
things were expected of him.
THIS YEAR he has sparked the
Wolverine cause, and even though
he has faced some very adequate
men he has managed to compile a
five won and two lost record.
At 157 pounds the Michigan
men are sparked by their cap-
tain, 'Bill Stapp.
Stapp has come through with
eight wins and one defeat. The
defeat came at the hands of
Earl D'Amico of Purdue.
Bud Holcombe, who has done
his grappling at 167 pounds, has
been an unexpected source of joy
to the Michigan mentor, Cliff
Keen. Holcombe, who until last
weekend was undefeated, was not
counted on too heavily at the be-

ginning of the season. However,
he has beaten some good men and
his seven victories have certainly
helped the Wolverines get where
they are today.
JOE PLANCK, the Michigan
grappler at 177" pounds, has also
shown up well to date. He has
worked up a total of five wins,
two losses and two draws. But
this record does not nearly give
his actual value to the team.

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