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May 26, 1951 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

}

SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1951

r

Big Parade
To Be Held
At 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Ann
Arbor will witness a Memorial
Day parade for the first time in
ten years.
Composed of 29 marching units,
the parade will include the vari-
ous veterans' organizations, groups
from the Ann Arbor schools, sev-
eral men's clubs, and units from
the Moms and Gold Star Mothers.
The marchers will follow a route
from the Rackham Building west
on Huron to Main, south on Main
to Liberty, and east on Liberty to
State,
Five Given
Men's Glee
Club Honors
Awards for scholarship and
service were presented to five
members of the Men's Glee Club
at its annual dinner held at the
Union.
Scholarship awards went to
John Bay, treasurer of the club;
Russell Christopher, a first year
member; E. Roy Duff, president
of the club; Richard Frank, vice-
president this year and the 1951-
52 president; and Merle Nelson,
business manager.
Duff and Bay were doubly hon-
ored with the Novelaires Award,
and Thomas Sparrow also receiv-
ed this award. Established last
year by C. Wayne Wright, this
award is given for extra work
done by members or alumni of the
club.
Nelson was also doubly honored
by the presentation of the club's
Service Award for his work in ar-
ranging the club's concerts.
Philip Duey was presented with
a lamp. in recognition of his work
as director.
Glee Club To Sing
The Men's Glee Club will leave
today from Willow Run Airport
for Scott Field, Illinois where they
will sing two concerts for the Air
Force Men.
This trip is a forerunner of a
longer tour of Air Force bases
which the men will make during
the week following Commence-
ment.

9'
M1w""

1*

ROOMS FOR RENT

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
CO-OP BULL SESSION-Co-op members, representing many different racial and religious back-
grounds find the well known after dinner bull session one of their most valuable experiences in col-
lege. Generally known for the heat they generate, this 'cooperative' bull session seems to have
found a lighter stage.
INTERNATIONAL LIVING:
Coaops Stress Varied Membership

ROOMS FOR SUMMER-Cool and de-
sirable for summer, 2 blocks from
campus. Phone 3-4685. 1320 Forest
Court. )71R
ROOMS FOR FALL - Very desirable
rooms, 2 blocks from campus, 2 block
from eating places. 1 double, 2 singles.
For quiet mature students. 1320 For-
est Court. Phone 3-4685. )70R
ROOMS FOR MEN-For summer or fall.
Tiled shower, 1101 E. Univ. Ave. or call
after 5. Ph. 2-8797. )69R
A MAN'S WORLD! Rooms near campus.
Singles, doubles and 2 suites for 3.
Twin size innerspring mattresses. Con-
genial atmosphere. Call 3-4738. 325 E.
Jefferson. )66R
ROOMS FOR MEN for summer session.
$5.00 a week for singles and doubles.
927 Forest. ) 67R
LARGE singlerand double rooms to rent
for summer session near campus.
Living room available for study. 1331
Washtenaw. Call 9611. )68R
ROOMS - Male students. Reasonable,
half block to campus, 417 E. Liberty.
.)5R
DOUBLES-Close to campus with cook-
ing privileges for advanced men stu-
dents. Electric range & 2 refrigerators,
2 baths with showers. Private entrance
for 9. Shown Tuesdays & Fridays from
8:15 to 11:15 a.m. or by appointment.
Cali 3YP794J. )64R
VERY REASONABLE-Rooms for men.
Summer & Fall. Hotplates, refrigera-
tor, shower, near campus, student
landlord. Jim Wright, 906 Greenwood
near Packard, Ph. 6336. )63R
DOWNSTAIRS spacious suite, private
entrance, shower, suitable three or
four men. Also large double and one
single. Shown before noon or after
six. 1430 Cambridge Road. )24F
SUMMER ROOMS for men, close to
campus. Phone Dexter 3192 for ap-
pointment. )61R
CLOSE TO CAMPUS-Clean, pleasant,
rooms for MALE students for summer
or fall. No smoking. Ph. 5372. )56R
ROOMS for summer school. Doubles
and singles. Student landlord. Near
Bus. Ad School. Call after 4 - Ph.
2-7862. 940 Greenwood. )55R
ROOMS FOR MALE STUDENTS--One
double and one single near Law Club
and Bus. Ad. School. Continuous
hot water, showers. 808 Oakland.
Ph. 22858. )12R
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Phi Delta Epsilon pin. Please
phone Nedra, 4547 New Women's. )92L
LOST-Nurse's gold watch with name
Jennie Perman on back, in vicinity of
S. State and E. Washington. Please
call 3-1117. )91L
FOR SALE
DRIVE HOME in your own 1950 Chev-
rolet. Radio, heater & seat covers.
Clean and in excellent condition. Ph.
5993. )122
1937 Terraplane A-1 condition. $275
cash. Lewis Akers. 2-1586. )121
HARLEY DAVIDSON 45-Running con-
dition, $120. Ph. 2-4401, Room 221,
Lloyd Hse. )120
ARMY ROTC GRADUATES - Summer
gaberdine blouse, 2 trou., size 40-L.
Good condition $25. USAF officer.
Ypsi 190M. )119
FOR SALE-Excellent English bike. Cali
6061 after Six. )118
1947 CHEVROLET Fleet Master-Excel-
lent condition. $775. Inquire at Doe's
Barbershop, 715 N. Univ. Ph. 9115. )117
FOR SALE - R.C.A. radio-phonograph.
Excellent condition. Ph. 6061 after 7.
)116
MOTORCYCLE-175 cc, 4 stroke, valve-
in-head, telescopic forks, spring frame,
beautiful design, almost new. Must
sell. Best offer. Call 3-4100. )113
FOR SALE-1940 Ford, good motor, clean
body, must sell soon. $195. Ph. 3CH-
6731. )112
FOR SALE-Man's Schwinn light-weight
bicycle, also Ciroflex camera, Rapax
lens. Both like new. Phone 8389. )111
EVERGREENS-Still time to transplant
junipers and arborvitae. M. Lee, 1208
Chem. Bldg. Mornings. Phone 8574.
MEN'S SEERSUCKER TROUSERS $2.99.
Requires no ironing, sanforized. Sizes
29 to 42. Open till 6 p.m. Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington. )5
J. H. COUSINS
ON STATE STREET

FOR SALE
BUDGIE training book free with each
parakeet sold. Canaries, finches &
bird supplies. 562 S. Seventh. )2
1938 WILLYS-$200.
Call 2-6943'. )105
HOLLEIFLEX, f3.5 Tessar lens, Heiland
solenoid and case. Excellent condi-
tion. Call Pete at 2-0026 after 7 p.m.
72
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED after June 14, vicinity
of Lake Gogebic, U.P. R. Mitchell, 820
E. Kingsley.
PERSONAL
WANTED-A READER! For next week.
Good pay. Choose own hrs. Ph. 3-1620
or call at Apt. 301 Observatory Lodge.
)51P
HELP WANTED
COLLEGE MEN -- TEACHERS
Earn $2000 this summer interviewing
people. Impossible? Not at all. Men
with us have earned $2000 in a single
month. A national organization de-
veloping a new idea that is sweeping
the country-not dependent on stra-
tegic material can be a permanent
position. If you have a car and can
follow instructions call Mr. Herbert
for interview 10 to 12 noon and 2 to 4
p.m. Detroit WO 1-5498. )51H

HELP WANTED
LIFE INSURANCE SALES
For Draft Exempt Seniors
You are invited to investigate an op-
portunity offered by the Provident
Mutual Life Insurance Company of
Philadelphia. The man we select will
receive a complete training in all
phases of Life Insurance Sales and
Service. Definite salary and comrnis-
sions if you can qualify by aptitude
test! See Cal Markham, 9:00 a.m, to
12 noon only, Monday to Friday at
Room 227, Municipal Court Bldg. No
telephone calls. )50H
ROOM AND BOARD
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS-Room
and Board or just board.. Reasonable
rates. Fraternity House, 3 blocks from
campus. For information call Paul
Anderson or John Wilson, 2-5644. )62R
COMFORTABLE well-furnished rooms.
On campus. Innersprings, showers,
linens furnished. Good food, home
cooking. Phone 2-6422.)57R
FOR RENT
FOR SUMMER SCHOOL - Two suites,
one single, for men students. Across
street from campus. 1008 Monroe. )26P
SUMMER SESSION-Furnished cottage
on Half Moon Lake, 30 minutes from
Ann Arbor. Quiet wooded isetting.
Good fishing & swimming. Phonq
Ypsilanti 3692-V. )25F

a

A

(Editor's note: This is the third in
a series of articles on cooperative liv-
ing at the University. They are being
run in connection with National Co-
operative Week which is now in prog-
ress.)
By HARLAND BRITZ
There's more to cooperative liv-
ing than saving money.
In an effort to get the most out
of their college experience, mem-
bers of student co-ops have suc-
ceeded in broadening both their
social and economic horizons to
a very high level.
They point to international, in-
ter-racial and inter-religious liv-

ing as the major reason for this.
For, from the very start, co-ops
have endeavored to have as var-
ied a membership in their organi-
zation as is possible on this cam-
pus.
* * *
THEIR FIRST step was placing
no restrictions on membership by
reason of race, religion or creed.
One result of this plan is that ci-
tizens of more than eleven coun-
tries now live in the various co-op
houses on campus.
Another result of their varied
membership is that practically
every shade of political think-

New York Publisher Considers

'U' Students' Cr
"I believe the two most famous
colleges for creative writing are
the University of Michigan and
the University of Alabama," stat-
ed Herbert Weinstock of the
Knopf Publishing House yester-
day.

DURING EXAM WEEK

11

HAMBURGS
CHEESEBURGS
FRENCH FRIES

2X4
1217 Prospect
Phone 7171
Free Delivery on $2.00 food order

Weinstock is in Ann Arbor now
looking over student manuscripts
in an effort to find new material
for his firm to publish.
* * *
"KNOPF HEARD there were a
lot of student writers here," said
Weinstock, "and sent me to in-
vestigate." In addition to reading
the manuscripts, Weinstock spent
a good part of yesterday after-
noon talking to the young cre-
ative writers. "I like to find out
what students interested in writ-

reative Writings
ing are talking and thinking
about," he said. "We want to findI
out just what the tastes of Am-'
erica's college students are."
Weinstock is looking over both
Hopwood and non-Hopwood
manuscripts and is particularly
interested in novels. Although
he personally likes poetry and
short stories, he explained that
they just do not sell. Knopf
published a former Hopwood
contest winner, Florence Maple's
novel "The Family Tree."
"Michigan's Hopwood contest is
unique," said Weinstock, "I have-
n't seen anything like it in any
of the other colleges I've visited."
He went on to say that he wished
he could stay to hear the Hopwood
lecture next Thursday.
"SOME COLLEGES just teach

ing present at the University is
represented in the cooperatives,
and probably no other residence
grouping can claim a higher
percentage of politically-minded
students.
Contrary to a generally accept-
ed view, co-op houses are not hot-
beds of Communism and other de-
grees of leftism.. Co-op members
claim to have their share of re-
actionaries as well as radicals,
though liberalism is the predom-
inant political philosophy.
GOOD STUDENTS, too, are at-I
tracted to co-ops. Every year the
co-op scholastic average is well
above the all campus average and
seldom is the co-op house with
the lowest average, below the gen-
eral student average.
But co-op living is not all
work. They boast a full slate of
social activities every semester.
Inter-co-op house parties are
the favorite pastime and there
are about six of these each year.
In addition the co-ops have an
annual banquet followed up by a
big square dance.
Exchangeddinners and post-
football game open houses are al-
so big favorites. Quite often the
co-ops have visitors from the
faculty for dinner and an 'after-
dinner speech or bull session.
It's the bull session that many
co-oppers consider the most valu-
able time spent at the University.
Here they get the best chance to
really meet their fellow students
from all over the world and share
varied ideas.
(Tomorrow: The Inter-cooperative
(Council)

BUSINESS SERVICES

TYPING - Accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Ph. 3-4040. )24B
TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS.
Sales, rentals and service. Morrill's,
314 S. State St. )4B
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Serv-
ice Company, 215 E. Liberty. Guar-
anteed repair service on all makes of
typewriters. ,8
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
830 S. Main, 7590. )17B
KIDDIE KARE
RELIABLE SITTERS available. Phone
3-1121. )10B
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
122 E. Liberty - Phone 8161 )2P
RAY HATCH will patch that match.
Learn to dance with
RAY HATCH DANCE STUDIO
209 S. State - Phone 5083 )4P
GRADUATION
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Ulrich's Hook Store

THE ANN ARBOR DRAMA SEASON
NOW PLAYING
LUCILE WATSON
fin
"RING ROUND THE MOON"
by Jean Anouilh, adapted by Christopher Fry
Music by Francis Poulenc
with
DONALD BUKA BRENDA FORBES
Curtain 8:30 MATINEE TODAY of 2:30
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
NEXT WEEK
HENRY DANIELL
in
T. S. Eliot's "The Cocktail Party"

Denim Shorts $1.95
Green & Navy. Sizes 10-18.

)3

'

STARTS TODAY!

CONTINUOUS
FROM 1 P.M.

*

K

k Ir

WEEKDAYS
44c to 5 P.M.

Ls

Lr

writing for commercial interests.
They encourage students to turn!
out pulp magazine literature," he
stated. "But Michigan has always
been a go~ d college for creative
writing, afd should be even more
so now since its new president is#
an author."
Weinstock said that there has
been a tendency toward a more
elaborate style among the young
authors in the last few years.
"They are getting away from
the Hemingway phase," he said.1
"Symbolism is the fad today."
Weinstock is taking a few man-
uscripts back to New York with
him for consideration. However,1
he said that he will not know any-c
thing definite about the results of1
this visit for a few weeks.

I
i

Library To Open
For Exam Study

He's She's
TOUGH! TAMELESS!

The General Library will be op-
en Saturday nights and Sundays
during the examination period to
accommodate students studying
for finals.
The Library will be open from
2 to 9 p.m. on the Sundays, May
27, June 3 and June 10, and until
10 p.m. on the two Saturdays in
the examination period, June 2
and June 9.
Only the main reading room
and the periodical reading room
will be open Sunday. Books from
other parts of the building must
be requested in advance 'on Sat-
urday.

A..

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

1Te aete

~. A

ENDING SUNDAY

An Intimate Theater
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

I

There has never icture
ld beena motionp pictre
like
A J. Arthur Rank Presentation

i

Continuous from
1:30 P.M. Daily

Superlative
Added Miniatures

I

LATE
SHOW
TONIGHT!
went fo
Battlegro
anfyo
o fo

i if".

I

1 .1

I

- III 1 1 - Ir w rr
141 -- --- -- - --- - -- --__r- _ _ ----- - ilk

III

"They made the
pants too long!" .
<.The U
from F
one o
music
71
UUJI -

'The baby pig . .
a mascot of the men..
a meal to
" hungry kids!
ke Player
aaii" is
f a talented
al outfit

. I

1

6

I

n

We carry a full line of
KOSHER DELICATESSEN
SALAMI CORNED BEEF PASTRAMER
WEINERS SMOKED FISH
FRESH DAILY
BREAD, BAGELS, ROLLS

01
with

bjective
hin sigbtj

Joel McOREA

...

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I

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111

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1 11

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