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May 19, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-05-19

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I

SATURDAY MAY 19, 1951
9,
ON THE SPOT
By GEORGE FLINT
WHEN THE YOUNG air force veteran took over the coaching of the
Michigan track squad, he faced one of the toughest assignments
any man could ask for.
"It was 1948 the year of the great deluge of Michigan champion-
ships, and the equally great exodus of Maize and Blue athletic coaches.
Ken Doherty, for 18 years the mentor of Wolverine track squads, was
one of the nine who left for greener fields.
* * * *
THE YOUNG MAN who took over for the great Doherty, who
had won seven Big Ten championships and whose athletes held 26
out of the 36 indoor and outdoor varsity records, was the then assist-
ant coach, Don Canham.
Since 1948, Canham has been in the position of a construc-
tion engineer wio must wait patiently for his materials to arrive.
Canham's inheritance from Doherty in the way of championship
stars was meager in the ultimate. He had Herb Barten, an Olym-
pic qualifier and a very good distanceman. And he had, after a
year's layoff, the great Chuck Fonville, world's record holder in
the shot put.
But from there on in it was a question of rebuilding from the
ground floor.
CANHAM, WHO WROTE himself into the Michigan record books as
a high jumper, was on the spot. A coach who does not produce is
vulnerable to criticism at most Big Ten schools. Michigan, to a slight
degree, is no exception. (Remember Harry Kipke?)
In 1949, his team finished seventh indoors, sixth outdoors.
In 1950, the young men whom he had drawn to Michigan by dint
of hard public relations work were beginning to give the Wolver-
ine some new teeth, and hopes were bright.
But .Canham was unlucky in the extreme. Injuries sprouted like
mushrooms at the indoor championships-and Michigan wound up
second, 21/4 points behind Ohio State. Outdoors, men who had been
running like deer suddenly started running like buffalo, and perform-
ances were far below the dual season's standards. The Wolverines
took in sixth place.
* * * *
THIS SEASON looks like the crest of the tide for the serious-
minded ,Canham, who probably moves around Ferry Field as much
as his distancemen during a practice session.
With a second-place finish indoors, the greatest collection of
individuals in recent Michigan history are pointing toward an
upset of the star-studded Illini, who ran away with the dirt
track titles.
Led by the fabulous Don McEwen, whose exploits have rewritten
most of the varsity distance marks, the Wolverines showed such great
improvement in last week's Michigan State meet ,that they must be
regarded as contenders for the championships next week at Evanston
(May 24-25).
* * * *
THE BAD LUCK which has haunted Canham's men for the past
three seasons must disappear some day. The law of averages is with
them.
To date in the outdoor season, the Wolverine thinclads hold
top conference marks in five events, plus a tie in a sixth.
Most of the standards were set in Saturday's dual meet with
State-and they are generally a good margin ahead of the nearest
contender's best effort. The top times and distances:
. 100-yard dash: Bill Konrad, 9.7.
880-yard run: George Jacobi, 1:53.8 (Chuck Whiteaker)
with 1:54.1, Is second).
Mile run: Don McEwen, 4:11.3.
Two mile run: Don MEwen, 9:15.1.
120-yard high hurdles: Don Hoover, 14.7 (tied with Mc-
Nulty of Illinois and Taylor of Indiana).
Broad jump: Ron Soble, 24 feet 71 Inches (Horace Coleman,
with 23 feet 93 inches, Is second).
If these Wolverines, plus the others who are very near to the top,
can equal and better their records at Evanston, the hold of the Illini
may well be loosened, and the much-deserved Big Ten title may finally
come Canham's way.
Anyone who saw the tall Michigan coach walk sadly from the
Dyche Stadium field after last spring's great disappointment will be
pulling for the Maize and Blue cindermen to win this one.
The time is ripe.
Gavilan Takes Welter Crown

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE '

. . a .v ....ta, a" 11 /. .r/A G E i

Larsen Bla oi ermakers,

1-

Michigan Net' Squad Faces
Weak Buckeyes Here Today

* 1' * *

4.4

Southpaw Pitches 7-Hitter;
Haynam Drives in Lone Run
Wolverine Triumph Second Consecutive
Big TenVictory; Play Purdue Finale Today

By DICK SEWELL
Michigan's twice-beaten tennis
team will be after its sixth win of
the season when it meets a weak
Ohio State squad at 10:00 this
morning on the Ferry Field courts.
The Buckeyes come to. town
dragging a woeful 0-9 record be-
hind them. They have lost con-
ference matches to Purdue, In-
diana, Illinois and Northwestern.
SUFFERING FROM a lack of
experience, the Ohioans will be
counting heavily on their only let-
ter men, Bill Van Riper, Ron Cox
and Jerry Schiff. Van Riper and
Cox are both seniors and Schiff a
junior.
Ohio State coach Herman
Wirthwein has a roster of 14
Iurons Host
M', Purdue
Tracks ters
By HERB NEIL
Michigan trackmen, who came
up with their best showing of the
season last week against Michi-
gan State, travel to Ypsilanti to-
night to meet Purdue and Michi-
gan State Normal in a triangular
meet.
The field events will get under-
way at 7:30, while the track
events commence at 8:00.
* * *
THE WOLVERINES are expect-
ed to have little trouble in defeat-
ing both the Boilermakers and the
Hurons.
Purdue has downed Notre
Dame, the University of De-
troit, and Iowa this spring, but
has lost to Wisconsin, while
Michigan trounced the Badgers
100-32 two weeks ago. The Wol-
verines gained a 72-42 win over
Michigan State Normal indoors
in February. ,
This meet will mark the first
time that Michigan has engaged
in an outdoor dual or triangular
meet under the lights.
THE HURONS are expected to
offer the Wolverines their strong-
est opposition in the sprints. Jim
Bibbs, who tied the Yost Field
House record of 6.2 in the 60-yard
dash in the Michigan A.A.U. meet
in January and defeated Bill Kon-
rad in the Hurons' dual meet with
Michigan, is entered in both the
100 and 220.
Michigan will face one of the
fastest mile relay quartets in
the Conference in Purdue. The
Boilermaker team of Ron Koons,
Boilermaker team of R o n
Koons, Dick Ricker, Byron Wea-
ver, and Meyer have stepped off
a 3:17.9 mile, several seconds.
better than the Wolverines' best.
Don McEwen should have little
trouble in the mile or the two
mile, with Ben Moring and Ed
Aylmer of Michigan State Normal
being his strongest competitors in
the mile.
* * *
BIBBS WILL enter the high
jump in addition to running the
sprints. He will face Michigan's
Lowell Perry, Bob Evans, and Bud
Sexton.
The Hurons' other leading field-
men will be Don Harower in the
pole vault and John Kovzman in
the shot put and discus. Kovz-
man defeated Tom Johnson in the
shot indoors this winter.

men to choose from and will
probably string along with sen-
iors Dick Forward, Ted Hilty
and Bernie Kamenir to fill the
remaining three berths.
Cox, who hails from Mobile,
Alabama, is the only member of
the top six who isn't a native
Ohioan, as contrasted to Michi-
gan's cosmopolitan squad which
features members from four states
and Canada.
* * *
WOLVERINE COACH Bill Mur-
phy will send his regular contin-
gent of Al Hetzeck, Steve Brom-
berg, Jack Smart, Mike Schwartz,
Gene Barracks and Bob Curhan
against the Buckeyes.
Records against common op-
ponents, Illinois, Purdue, and
Michigan State point to an easy
win for the Murphymen today.
Against the Boilermakers the
Ohio Staters found themselves at
the short end of a 8-1 score. The
Wolverines trounced Purdue easily
by the same count.
*4 * *
BOTH TEAMS lost to the Illini,
Michigan by a 5-4 margin and
Ohio by 9-0. The Buckeyes fared
equally badly with Indiana and
Northwestern, being blanked by
both squads.
Yesterday the men from Colum-
bus were trounced by the Spartans
at East Lansing, 9-0.
Today's match is the last dual
meet of the season for Michigan.
Only the conference champion-
ships at Evanston, Illinois, -May
23, 24 and 25 remain to be played.
'NI' Club Sails
In Midwestern
Championships
By JACK SOTHERLAND
The Michigan Sailing Club will
be out to renew its monopoly on
the midwestern sailing crown today
when the Wolverines andneight
other schools break sail in the
fourth annual Midwest Invitation-
al regatta at Columbus.
Despite the fact that Michigan
has taken the Midwest title every
year since the regatta's conception
in 1948, it looks like the Ann Ar-
bor crew will just be another team
this year.
THE WOLVERINES, who sailed
through an undefeated season last
year, haven't been able to repeat
their unblemished record in this
Spring's racing.
The season's opener, with
Notre Dame, was practically
washed out by the high winds and
rough waters out at Whitmore
Lake. Though only one race was
started on the hazardous
course, Red Oppenheimer skip-
pered the Michigan dinghy home
ahead of the fleet to give the
Wolverines a one point victory.
Michigan's 'winning streak' was
abruptly snapped the following
week when the University of To-
ledo sailed away with top honors
in the Michigan Invitational regat-
ta, Michigan placing second. The
Wolverines took five firsts out of
the sixteen individual races sailed
but were unable to catch up with
the high-riding Toleloans.
LAST WEEK, Toledo and a sur-
prisingly strong Purdue team fin-
ished one-two in the eliminations
for this week's championship re-
gatta. Michigan took a third place,
which qualified them for the Col-
umbus trip.
Don McVittie and Bob Allen
will probably be skippering the
Wolverine Dinghies when the
fleet sets sail. They have car-
ried the Michigan colors in most

of the meets this year and will
be out to keep the Midwest title
at Michigan.
The winner and the runner up
at the Columbus meet will repre-
sent the Midwest at the national
championships at Boston this sum-
mer against the top collegiate
sailors in the country.

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
BOB LARSEN WEARS VICTORY SMILE AFTER SHUTTING
OUT "PURDUE, 1-0, AT FERRY FIELD YESTERDAY.
MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Tigers Tip A's in Ninth 9-6;
Chisox Snap Yankee Streak

By BOB LANDOWNE
Bb Larsen chalked up a 1-0
vic ory in a battle of lefthanders
yesterday, as Michigan beat Pur-
due on the Ferry Field diamond
in the opener of their weekend
series.
Larsen neatly scattered seven
hits in gaining both his and the
Wolverines' second straight con-
ference victory.
PURDUE SOUTHPAW Eldon
Nelson went the distance for the
Boilermakers giving up nine hits
and the lone run of the ball game.
It was in the third inning that
Frank Howell brought the win-
ning tally across the plate as
he scored from second base on
B r u c e Haynam's double to
righteenter field.
Pitcher Larsen had opened the
inning with the first of his two
singles, but he was forced at sec-
ond by Howell who then reached
scoring position on a passed ball
as Haynam was batting.
* * *
PURDUE CAME very close to
tying the game with two out in
the sixth inning when Norm
Banas was out at the plate as he
tried to score from second base
on a single to deep short by Bob
Rasmussen.
Shortstop Haynam made the
throw to first base too late to
beat Rasmussen and Al Wey-
gandt alertly relayed to the
plate to nip Banas.
Larsen then finished up very
strongly as he proceeded to retire
the last nine men in a row. The
husky southpaw struck out seven
men along the way while he only
walked one and also hit one bat-
ter.
* * *
THE MICHIGAN batters tried
to give him more of a cushion but
Nelson was also very effective in
the pinches and had good field-
ing support behind him.
The Wolverines got runners to
second and third with one out
in the fourth inning on 'singles
by Gerry Dorr and Bill Mogk,
Mogk took second on the unsuc-
cessful throw to third trying to
catch Dorr from taking the ex-
tra base on the hit-and-run.
But the rally was quelled im-

mediately as Dorr was picked off
third by catcher Jack Kaiser with
Gil Sabuco at bat. Sabuco then
flied out to end the inning.
* * *
IN THE FIFTH Larsen got his
second hit but Howell failed in his
sacrifice attempt and Leo Koces-
ki's two out single went for
naught.
Coach Ray Fisher also tried to
boost Larsen's lead when he sent
in Doug Peck to bat for Sabuco
to lead off the seventh inning.
Peck came through with a dou-
ble, but pinch runner Tom Gou-
lish was out at third on Larsen's
attempted sacrifice and then
Howell hit into a fast double
play.
Fortunately Larsen only needed
that one big run.
T h e Michigan-P ' due series
concludes today with game time
2 p.m.

* *
PURDUE AB
Hanes If 3
Nelson, R. et' 3
zYurick 1
Becker cf 0
Mateja ss 4
Banas lb 3
Wallace rf 4
Kaiser c 4
Rasmussen 3b 4
Olds 2b 3
Nelson, E. p 3
Totals 32
MICHIGAN AB
Howell of 4
Haynam ss 3
Koceski If 3
Palmer c 4
Weygandt lb 3
Dorr 3b 4
Mogk rf, 2b 3
Sabuco2 b 2
xPeck 1
yGoulish 0
Fancher rf 0
Larsen p 3
Totals 30

HPO A
20 '0o
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 3 0 0
1 2 0 0
0 1 2 0
2 4 0 0
1 x x 0
0 1 2 0
7 24 7 0

By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA-Five singles,
a home run and wild throw by
Athletic pitcher Bob Hooper gave
the Detroit Tigers six- runs in the
ninth inning last night and a
9-6 victory over the Philadelphia
A's.
Steve Souchock opened the
inning with his third homer of
the season. Then came singles
by Joe Ginsberg, Johnny Lipon,
and Johnny Groth, an out, and
two more singles by Don Kollo-
way and George Kell.
Bob Cain, recently received in a
trade with the Chicago White Sox,
was the winning pitcher, relieving
Ted Gray after Dave Philley had
hit a grand slam homer in the
fifth to give the A's a 6-3 cushion.
CHICAGO 7, NEW YORK 4
NEW YORK-Eddie Stewart, a
fill-in outfielder for the Chicago
White Sox, parked a four-run
homer into the right field stands
Intras quad Tilt
To End Spring
Grid Practice
Spring football reaches its cli-
Imax today in the .Michigan sta-
dium with the annual intrasquad
game and the awarding of the
Meyer Morton trophy to the most
improved player.
.The contest, beginning at 2:30.
culminates six weeks of practice
and has all the features of a regu-
lation clash. Bennie Oosterbaan
will direct the Blue team while the
eminent Wally Weber will outline
the strategy to be used by the
White aggregation.
REFEREES will be in attend-
ance to enforce ethical play and
also to help hold injuries at a
minimum by restricting lough-
house tactics. The gates will be
thrown open to all interested spec-
tators.
The game is a mighty import-
ant one for a lot of the gridders.
Besides the six listed as candi-
dates for the trophy, the im-
pression given the coaching staff
by each gridman helps deter-
mine who will be asked back
next fall.
Through the years many players
haverisen from compartive ob-
scurity in the ranks of the "rum-
mie dums" to candidates for start-
ing berths by impressive perform-
ances in the intrasquad tilt.

yesterday to blast the New York
Yankees, 7-4, and snap the league
leaders' ten-game home winning
streak.
BOSTON 2, CLEVELAND 1
BOSTON-After eight relief ap-
pearances, lefty Maury McDermott
made his first 1951 start for the
Boston Red Sox a successful one
yesterday as he struck out nine'
Cleveland Indians and went on to
a 2-1 victory over Mike Garcia.
CUBS 18, PHILADELPHIA 9
CHICAGO-The Chicago Cubs
unloosed a bombardment of 17
hits, including three home runs
and seven doubles yesterday to
submerge the Philadelphia Phil-
lies, 18-9, before a small crowd at
Wrigley Field.
The Cubs lambasted four
Philly pitchers for a total of 33
bases. In their last three games
the Cubs have battered the op-
position for 38 hits and have
scored 44 runs. In this same
span, Ransom Jackson, rookie
third baseman, has driven in
11 runs, scored 9, hit 4 homers
and collected 8 hits in 14 times
at bat.
BROOKLYN 6, ST. LOUIS 3
ST. LOUIS-A crowd of 26,014,
largest of the season in St. Louis,
saw the Brooklyn Dodgers club the
St. Louis Cardinals, 6-3, last night
as Preacher Roe hurled a neat
7-hitte past the Cards. Roe won
his fifth straight game this year,
and Duke Snider homered to help
the Dodger cause.
4 .4 :
NEW YORK 4, CINCINNATI 3
CINCINNATI-The New York
Giants shook off Cincinnati pitch-
er Kenny Raffensberger's death
lock in the sixth inning last night,
scoring all their four runs in that
frame to snap a five game Redleg
win streak. Sal Maglie won his
fifth game of the year against 2
defeats.
BOSTON 12, PITTSBURGH 3
PITTSBURGH - Rugged Max
Surkout had an easy time pitch-
ing the Braves to a 12-3 win over
the Pittsburgh Pirates last night.
Ralph Kiner and Wally Westlake
collected round-trippers for Pitts-
burgh, but the batting star was
Boston's Walker Cooper with five-
for-five.

H PO A
1 3 2
1 5 0
1 7 2
1 7 2
1 12
1 0 0
0 0 0
9 27 12

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

x Doubled for Sabuco in 7th
y Ran for Peck in 7th
z Grounded out for R. Nelson in 8th
Purdue . ............ .000 000 000--0
Michigan ............001 000 0x-1
RBI-Haynam; Doubles-Haynam,
Banas, Peck; SB-Weygandt; DP-
Banas and Mateja; Left on base
Purdue 7, Michigan 8; BB-Nelson
2, Larsen 1; SO-Larsen 7; HBP-
Nelson (Weygandt), Larsen (Hanes);
PB-Kaiser.

I

Major League Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE

Brooklyn
Chicago
Boston
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
St. Louis
New York
Philadelphia

W L Pct. GB
16 12 .571 ..
15 13 .537 1
16 14 .533 1
14 14 .500 2
14, 15 .483 21/2
13 14 .481 2%z
15 17 .469 3
13 17 .433 4

New York
Chicago
Detroit
Washington
Boston
Cleveland
Philadelphia
St. Louis

W L
19 9
15 9
1S 10
1s1513
15 II
13 12
12 13
8 20
8 21

Pet.
.679
.625
.600
.577
.520
.480
.286
.276

GB
3,
4Y,
5 i
Ili ,

NEW YORK--(P)-Kid Gavilan
of Cuba was crowned World, NBA,
and New York State Welterweightl
Champion as he decisively defeat-
ed Johnny Bratton of Chicago be-j
fore a crowd of 11,747 at Madison
Square Garden last night.
The judges gave the decision un-
animously to Gavilan, 11-4, 11-4,
and 8-5-2.
* * *
BRATTON, silent and despon-
dent, believed he broke his right
hand in the fourth round.
Gavilan was wildly heralded
by his fellow countrymen when
the decision was announced.
Among those who climbed into
the ring, almost an unprecedent-

ed event in the Garden, was the
Cuban Ambassador himself, Luis
Machado. t
* * *
THERE ARE a few items to
clear up, including a July date with,
challenger Billy Graham of New
York and claims of Britain's Eddie
Thomas before Gavilan will gain
universal recognition. l
After the seventh it was strict-
ly no contest. Bratton's counter-
rights still had a wallop in the
sixth but he seemed to tire badly
after thfat. Gavilan took charge,
pacing himself in an easy gallop.
"He try my punches, I was
ready," said Gavilan through a
wide grin as he left the ring.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 18, Philadelphia 9
New York 4, Cincinnati 3 (Night)
Boston 12, Pittsburgh 3 (Night)
Brooklyn 6, St. Louis 3 (Night)
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Chicago - Church
(2-3) vs. Klippstein (2-0).
Brooklyn at St. Louis -Newcombe
(3-1 vs. Poholsky (2-3).
New York at Cincinnati-Kennedy
(0-1) or Koslo (1-2) vs. Fox (2-1).
Boston at Pittsburgh - Bickford
(5-2) vs. Law (1-1).

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 9, Philadelphia 6 (Night)
Chicago 7, New York 4
Boston 2, Cleveland 1
Washington 6, St. Louis 2 (Night)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Philadelphia - Truck
(0-0) vs Fowler (0-3).
Chicago at New York-Holcombe
(2-1) vs. Lopat (6-0).
Cleveland at Boston-Feller (4.0)
vs. Parnell (3-3).
St. Louis at Washington-Kenneh
(0-1) vs. Consuegra (3-1).

SENIORS!
Graduation Announcements
t S e at r U r
FOLLETT'S
State Street at North University

- -----------------------...-- -.--------..-----.--...--.
.1 0
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Egg Salad................................25e
Ham Salad .............................35e
Tuna Fish..................................35c
Lettuce & Tomato.......................25e
Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato..................35c
Cheese ..................... ..........25c
Peanut Butter............................20c
home-made Chili...... . . . . .......... ... 30e
Baked Ham................................40e
French Fries (per order)..................25e
Home-made Soup........................25c
Golden Fried Chicken.....................$1.00

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