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May 18, 1951 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-18

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FRIDAY, MAY 18 1951

THE MICHIGAN T1 A lt.V°

,.. w.t #47f7\ !

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I M TALKING...
By Jo'hn it tk4

1-11 -" 1 ti ,L 1 l U-A 111 .p IM L ..3 PACE taiIIPBU

lSC CDefeats

olverine Netmen, 8-1

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DOING ANYTHING Sunday afternoon? If not, drop down to Ferry
Field to see the first intercollegiate soccer match between Michigan
and Michigan State. The contest, which starts at 2:15, features the
Michigan All-Stars versus the MSC Soccer Club, and is an attempt
to create interest in intercollegiate soccer here at Michigan. Although
most major colleges in the country have varsity soccer squads, both
schools are still striving for varsity status.
The All-Star team, composed of players from the International
League's soccer competition, has been an operating entity for the
last five years, but non-varsity status has hindered the scheduling
of games with other schools. Only two matches were played last
year, one being a 1-1 tie with the Corinthians, a professional outfit
from Detroit, the other a 4-1 loss to Michigan Normal in Ypsilanti.
The All-Stars are quite a cosmopolitan bunch. Of the eleven
starting members five are from Turkey, two each from the United
States and Iran, and one apiece from Sweden and Germany. The nature
of the State aggregation is a subject open for speculation.
* * * *
Softball Controversy . .
SERE'SA MOVEMENT underfoot to change the ball used iu IM
Ssoftballcompetition from 12 inches to the 16 inch type. Supporters
of this change argue that the present game, with all its walks, is
much too slow and often involves only the pitcher and catcher while
the other players sit on their haunches and try to look interested.
By using the bigger ball everybody sees plenty of action, they
state, and the game itself moves much faster. Scores are generally
lower and competition is keener. Ball clubs don't have to base all
their hopes on having a top-flight pitcher, because pitching skill is
almost negligible. This should eliminate those one-man ball clubs
prevalent in the current type of play.
A recent look at the fraternity standings with their accom-
panying records brings out the axiom that athletic noses must
be kept to the grindstone if any success is expected. Of the four
houses that head the list all have entered in every event. The
fifth ranking outfit, Phi Delta Theta, didn't pick up any points in
three events, but it's the only one in the top ten which has any
zeroes.
When asked what becomes of the perrenial doormats in IM frater-
nity competition, Earl Riskey, IM director, said that a trophy will
be awarded to the top house of the smallest 15 houses. At last re-
ports Delta Sigma Phi was leading in this department, followed by
Chi Psi and Acacia.

Bromnberg
Scores Only
'M'Triumph
Special to The Daily
EAST LANSING - Michigar
State's red hot tennis team turnec
on the heat again here yesterday
afternoon to drub the Wolverines
8-1.
The defeat was the second of the
season for the Murphymen who
lost to Illinois earlier this spring,
For the Spartans it was the eighth
straight win of the year.
THE SOLE Michigan winner
was Steve Bromberg who battled
his way to a 8-6, 3-6, 8-6 win over
MSC's Wajy Kau. Bromberg
staged a stirring rally to overcome
a four game deficit in the final
set and win the match.
In the battle of champions,
Spartan Len Brose spoiled cap-
tain Al Hetzeck's undefeated
record 6-1, 6-4. In doing so
Brose extended his own win
streak to eight.
Hetzeck had trouble getting
started against the flashy Spartan
and his second set rally fell short
of the mark.
JACK SMART lost a heart-
breaker to Dave Mills in the num-
ber three singles match, 4-6, 10-8,
6-1. With matchpoint in his
grasp in the second set Smart
served to Mills whose return hit
the top of the net and rolled over.
Smart reached the ball, but his
desperate return dropped inches
outside the baseline.
John "Pancho" Sahratian
caught Michigan's M i k e
Schwartz off guard and polished
him off 6-0, 6-3 in the quickest
match of thetafternoon.
In the closest match of the day,
Gene Barrack lost his number five
singles contest to Keith Kimble,
4-6, 12-10, and 6-4. At one point
Barrack was within two of match-
point, but he lost his advantage
and was squeezed out in the last
set.
x j
THE SIXTH SINGLES match
was another close affair. Wolver-
ine Bob Curhan lost in three sets
to Dick Rieger, 4-6, 9-7 and 6-3.
Doubles play also found the
Spartans in the driver's seat, win-
ning with greater ease than in
the singles.
In the number one match Het-
zeek and Bromberg lost their
first of the season to Brose and
Sahratian, 6-4, 5-7 and 6-4. The
Michigan duo rallied momentar-
ily to cop the second set, but
Brose and Sahratian put out
the fire with near perfect play
In the final frame.
Both Smart-Schwartz and Bar-
rack-Curhan suffered their sec-
ond doubles loss of the campaign.
GRADUATION
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Ulrich's Book Store

Yankees Defeat Cleveland,1-0,
On Di~laggio's Clutch Single

FMsine Opposes Purdue;
Fisher_ Opens with Larsen

WasHisPaceRed ,,,
T WAS JUST A YEAR AGO that the tall, scholarly, but none-too-
athletic looking gent strolled up to the sports desk and asked if
this was where a ball score should be turned in. The night editor,
replied that it was, and what was the score he wanted to report?
"Our pledges played the sorority across the street in softball
today," he answered with a face a mile long. "Sorry, buddy, but
that's women's page material," the NE said, "go see them about it."
i.
As the guy sadly headed for the women's desk, someone hollered
out, "By the way, how'd the game turn out?"
"We lost," came the reply.
In keeping with the.-boy-girl trend of thought, Earl Riskey an-
nounced that next Friday is the last co-recreational night of the year.
Also, there is considerable picnic equipment available for all interested
parties. Ben Cope is the man to see for the outing equipment.
Riskey's Records ...
THILE SEARCHING FOR interesting material to insert in this
column, we ran across IM oddities that Mr. Riskey has been keep-
ing for to these many years. After a cursory glance we reached the
conclusion that softball today just isn't the sport it formerly was.

t

STEVE BROMBERG
.. .only 'M' winner
1Phi Chi.Downs
Phi Delta Phi
In IMSoftball
Phi Chi won its third straight
Professional Fraternity baseball
game with an 11-0 decision over
Phi Delta Phi yesterday at Ferry
Field.
Bill Daehler went the distance
for the Phi Chis, limiting the Phi
Delts to four hits.
PHI CHI came up with two big
innings that practically insured
their win. The winners collected
their eleven muddy runs in the
first and fourth frames, but the
wattery condition of the field pre-
vented them from inflicting any
further damage to the Phi Delt
morale.
The hitting was well distri-
buted with practically all of the
Phi Chi players contributing
singles and doubles to the win-
ning effort.
Yesterday's 11 runs enabled the
Phi Chis to boosttheir total num-
ber of runs in this season's intra-
mural play to 46, against only
three for their opponents.
ALTHOUGH THEY weren't able
to add any homers to their credit
yesterday, Chuck Krecke and Bob
Schmidlin have played no small
part in the Chi Phi success with
a cumulative tally of four home
runs in the two previous games.
Phi Chi will meet Alpha Rho
Chi at Ferry Field Monday to de-
termine if they will be in the first,
second or third place play-offs
which will be held later in the
week.
Brownie Trade Moss
To Red Sox for Batts
ST. LOUIS-P)--The St. Louis
Browns traded catcher Les Moss.
yesterday to the Boston Red Sox
for catcher Matt Batts, rookie
pitcher Jim Suchecki and an un-
disclosed sum of cash.
The Browns also are to receive
another player to be agreed upon
by the clubs at the end of this
season.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Joe DiMaggio's
clutch single, a dazzling throw to
the plate by Hank Bauer and
some pinch pitching by Allie Rey-
nolds gave the New York Yankees
a 1-0 triumph over the Cleveland
Indians yesterday.
DiMaggio's single came with
two out in the first inning and
scored Bobby Brown from sec-
ond. It was one of the four hits
yielded by loser Early Wynn
and Lou Brissie who relieved
him in the eighth.
A tremendousthrow by Hank
Bauer in the eighth inning pre-
served Reynolds' shutout and kept
the Yankees' record of not having
lost a game at Yankee Stadium
this season. The win, their fourth
in a row over Cleveland, was their
10th straight here.
SENATORS 11, TIGERS 6
WASHINGTON-Conrado Mar-
rero, making an unexpected start,
pulled the Washington Senators
out of their four-game losing
streak by defeating the Detroit
Tigers 11-6.
For Marrero it was his fifth
straight win..
Thehstubby Cuban right hand-
er was called in when Bob Ku-
zava reported an ailing back
before game time. He was
pounded for 16 hits but wasn't
in trouble after the Senators
scored five runs off Freddie
Hutchinson in the third inning
to grab a 6-1 lead.
Major League
Standings

Dick Kryhoski, Pat Mullin, Joe
Ginsberg and Johnny Lipon each
got three hits for the Tigers,
, , ,* er .
CUBS 7, DODGERS 0
'uCHICAGO-Hank Sauer's three-
run homer in the fifth inning em-
broidered a seven-hit shutout job
by Frank Hiller as the Chicago
Cubs won the rubber game of their
three-tilt series with the National
League-leading Brooklyn Dodgers,
7-0.
The win moved the lugging
Cubs to within one game of the
Dodgers.
Besides Sauer's circuit smash,
Ransom Jackson, Cub third base-
man boomed a none-aboard hom-
er off Brooklyn loser Erv Palica
in the first.
BUCS 12, GIANTS 7
PITTSBURGH - Ralph Kiner
powered out his sixth-home run of
the season and a booming double
to account for five runs as the
Pittsburgh Pirates mauled the
New York Giants, 12-7, in -a par-
ade of pitchers.
REDS 6, BRAVES 5
CINCINNATI - The Cincinnati
Reds -were staggering at the fin-
ish, but they eked out a 6 to 5
victory over the Boston Braves
to climb a little closer to first
place in the neck and neck Na-
tional League pennant race._
The Reds, winning their fifth
straight game and their seventh'
in their last eight outings, mov-
ed to within a game and a half
of first-place Brooklyn.
A's, 7, BROWNS 6
PHILADELPHIA-Eddie Joost's
ninth inning single with two out_
scored Ray Murray with the run
that gave the Philadelphia Ath-
letics a 7-6 victory over the St.
Louis Browns tonight. Gus Zer-
vial of the A's hit his seventh
home run in four successive games
to tie the American League record.

The Purdue baseball squad will
invade Ferry Field today and Sat-
urday for a two-game series with
Michigan.
Starting time for today's game
is 3:30 p.m.
M , 1a
THE BOILERMAKERS have a
1-3 conference record this season.
They have lost to Michigan State
Criler to Europe
Herbert O. (Fritz) Crisler,
Michigan's Athletic Director
announced yesterday that he is
flying to Germany July 2 to
spend two weeks conducting
sports clinics and setting up
recreational programs for the
Army occupation forces.
He will join a party of prom-
inent athletic directors and.
football coaches making the
trip. They include Herman
Hickman, Yale's football coach,
Paul (Bear) Bryant, the Ken-
tucky mentor, and Michigan
State's Clarence (Biggie) Munn.
The group will leave from
WestoverField in Massachu-
setts.
Crisler took and passed his
overseas physical Wednesday.
once and Ohio State twice. OSU
is currently leading the field with
a 6-0 record.
Coach Henry Strom has had
a big rebuilding problem to do
this year, since most of last
year's veterans are gone. Es-
pecially painful was the loss of
Bill Skowron, sensational sopho-
more shortstop last year. Skow-

ron batted .500 for the season
to set a new Big Ten record,
then he was snapped up by the
New York Yankees.
In its last four conference
games, Purdue has batted .216,
and is ninth in the Big Ten team
standings. Michigan is eighth in
hitting with .222, but rests In last
place.
THE MAIN Boilermaker veteran
strength is concentrated behind
the plate, where Jack Kaiser
(.364) and Haldon Graves (.333)
hold sway, Most promising of the
sophomores is Phil Mateja,, also
batting .333, who has taken over
for Skowron at shortstop:
The hurling staff is very in-
experienced with only one re-
maining veteran, George Crain,
who has a 1-1 season record nd
will probably take the mound
today.
FORDHAM
UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
CO-EDUCATIONAL
Member of Assn. of Americas
Law Schools
Matriculants must be College
graduates and present full tronscript
of College record.
Classes Begin Sept. 24, 1951
REGISTRAR FORDHAM UNIV
SCHOOL OF LAW
302 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y

wow

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York ............19 8 .704
Chicago ..............14 9 .609
Detroit.............14 10 .583
Washington.........14 11 .560
Cleveland...........12 12 .500
Boston..............12 12 .500
Philadelphia...........8 19 .299
St. Louis ............ 8 20 .286

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11
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SPRINGTIME IS BEER TIME!
for those Outdoor Parties
and Picnics

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 1, Cleveland 0.
Washington 11, Detroit 6.
Philadelphia 7, St. Louis 6 (night).
Chicago at Boston, postponed, cold.
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Philadelphia (night)-Gray
(1-2) vs. Kellner (3-1).
St. Louis at Washington (night)-
Sleater (0-5) vs. Kuzava (2-3).
Chicago at New York-Pierce (3-2)
vs. Shea (1-0).
Cleveland at Boston-Garcia (2-1)
vs. McDermott (0-1).

FREE
REMINGTON Factory Repair
Men will be at Ulrich's this
Thurs., Fri., and Sat. to CLEAN,
OIL and ADJUST your Rem-
ington Razor,
Free of charge
$7.50 in trade for your
old Electric Razor
Ulrich's Book Store

'I

* BEER * WINE r SOFT DRINKS * KEG BEER
Open Daily 10 A.M., Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.
114 E. William Phone 7191

f.i'i::: ''i <; :ii;;:'=:;:i::"ii;i;{i~i$:W :::U ~::<.::tii~t~frir:Si :.: i:i"riE :
+ UTI. UrTL.EUALF'i::vi
19 TE LlJ'LL.'9A-
DROPARflIA
iNT fLGE OF/ Ur©
JiALF.....~sE

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NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Brooklyn...........15 13 .556
Pittsburgh ..........14 13 .519
Chicago............14 13 .519
Boston ..............15 14 .519
cincinnati ..........14 14 .500
St. Louis ............13 13 .500
Philadelphia ........13 16 .448
New York ...........14 17 .452

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U___ ____ ____ _ * . -4

III

SENIORS!
Graduation Announcements

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 6, Boston 5.
Pittsburgh 12, New York 6.
Chicago 7, Brooklyn 0.
St. Louis 2, Philadelphia 1.
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at Pittsburgh (night)--Sur-
kont (4-1) vs. Queen (3-1), or
Chambers (3-3).
New York at Cincinnati (night)-
Maglie (4-2) vs. Raffensberger
(1-3).
Philadelphia at Chicago-Konstanty
(1-0) vs. Schultz (3-2).
Brooklyn at St. Louis (night)-Roe
(4-0) vs. Boyer (1-1) or Lanier
(1-2).

. . , at . . ,
FOLLETT'S.
State Street at North University

I.F.C. BALL
PICTURES
TODAY
In Administration Building J

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95

EVER HOLD HANDS
LIKE THESE?
They're not soft and warns, these hands.
They're hard and cold -and mechanical.
They work at the Oak Ridge atomic energy
plant, preparing radioactive isotopes
for shipment to Bell Telephone Laboratories
and to other research centers.
These isotopes -which serve as tracers
are used by Bell scientists to study the
materials that go into the telephone
system. Our research men, working with
Geiger counters, are able to detect
wear in relay contacts, impurities in metals,
the penetration of preservatives in wood.
This new research tool helps us to

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Sizes 6 to 12
Widths A-B-+C-D

MEN! Buy the shoe that
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good looks and smartness
with the traditional Win-
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for man-size durability.
At 10.95 a buy in any

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