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May 17, 1951 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1951-05-17

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wo

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 17,195

RTY UPSURGE:
Political Scientists Note
Increasing Nazi Strength

By ZANDER HOLLANDER
L Nazi revival is on in Western
many.
'his conclusion was drawn by
University political scientists
terday from the recent election
the state of Lower Saxony, in
British zone.
* *
'HE RETURNS gave the Social-
Reichs party, led by ex-Nazis
ist Doris and former Maj. Gen.
o Remer, 11 per cent of the
The party's unexpectedly
rong showing was viewed by
of. Marshall Knappen as "a
Dud on the horizon" and by
anfred Vernon, a refugee from
tier Germany in 1933, as
ymptomatic of a largerportion
Germany."
oth men noted that the West
rman Federal Government -had
ounced the Socialist Reichs
ty as "neo-Nazi" before the
tion. Some observers feel that
Bonn government's condemna-
i may be responsible for the
ty's surprising strength.
ut, Vernon emphasized, the
:ony election coupled with the.
urge of the Nazi-led Austrian
gue of Independents, "indicates
t the de-Nazification program
not been a complete success."
'ERNON, a Stanford graduate,
culated on the possibility of the
ty,. like its Nazi ancestor, de-
Dping underground storm troops
be used in a time of crisis.
"They will operate from a
ng-range viewpoint," Vernon
edicted, "looking toward the
isis which may come at the
d of the occupation."
'rof. Knappen drew a similar
ENDING FRIDAY

parallel between the Socialist
Reichs party and the Nazis.
Ascribing both movements to
economic chaos, Knappen scored.
the broken promise of the Atlantic
Charter, that all nations would
havefree access to raw materials
and trade.
"We have not kept this promise,"
Knappen said, "and this, combined
with Germany's militarist tradi-
tion, provides a fertile breeding
ground for the ex-Nazis to exploit."
"But the leadership is not dan-
gerous unless given a chance by
the economic conditions," he con-
cluded.
Campus
Calendar
Events Today
PROF. LOWRY NELSON of the
University of Minnesota sociology
department will lecture on "Rur-
al Education in Our Changing
Society," at 4:15 p.m. in Kellogg
Auditorium.
THE UNIVERSITY UNIT of the
ROTC will hold its annual in-
spection at 8 a.m. today and to-
morrow at the drill area in Ferry
Field.
* * *
THE INTERNATIONAL CEN-
TER will hold a "World Coopera-
tion Week" open house from 4:30
to 6 p.m.'Everyone is invited.
STUDENT ADVISORS will meet
again from 3-5 p.m. in Rm. 1209
of Angell Hall to advise students
on literary college courses.
* * *
INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL direc-
tors and psychiatrists will begin
a three-day conference on mgdi-
cal aspects of human affairs in
industry. A series of panel dis-
cussions will be conducted by
University faculty members from
the School of Public Health, Me-
dical school, Institute for Social
Researcli, School of Nursing, Bu-
reau of Psychological Services and
School of Business Administra-
tion.
* * *
Coming Event
TALK-S. P. WYATT of the
astronomy department will speak
on "Exploring the Universe" at 8
p.m. Friday in Rm. 3017 of Angell
Hall. The student observatory will
be open until 10 p.m. for observa-
tion of the Moon and Saturn fol-
lowing the talk.
I'1

GI Students
May Pursue
'U' Studies
By SAM SIPORIN
Drafted students may have op-
portunities to continue university-
level education after induction in-
to the army and overseas station-
ing, the Pentagon has announced.
Collaborating with the exten-
sion programs of two American
universities, the Pentagon is pro-
viding degree-rewarding educa-
tion for men stationed abroad. In
Europe, the University of Mary-
land is in charge of the program;
in the Pacific area, the University
of California.
THE PROGRAM is offered to
fulfill the two-year-college-educa-
tion-requirement needed by: (1)
Army officers who do not already
possess it; (2) Enlisted or. drafted
nen who hope to qualify for offi-
cers training. Both programs
teach courses which comply with
most college requirements in the
United States.
At the Maryland-in-Europe
school nearly four thousand
men and women in uniform are
taking courses. These classes
average from two to four
months in length and are con-
ducted in 49 centers, includ-
ing London, Paris, Berlin, Vi-
enna and Trieste.
Matriculation, the cost of books
and about three-fourths of the
tuition are paid for by the Army.
* * *
THE FULL-TIME faculty in-
cludes 28 scholars; in addition,
there are 55 part-time instructors,
many of whom are European.
'These teachers say that their mil-
itary students have the same ser-
ious approach to their studies as
the former soldiers who went back
to college under the GI. Bill of
Rights.
In Europe, it is easiest for the
"housekeeping" troops, who lead
a semi-civilian life, to maintain
the academic routine, a Pentagon
report says. For combat units
more leeway is given in making
up lost time. A similar plan exists
in the Pacific zone.
'U' Orchestra
To Perform
Highlighting the third and fi-
nal University Symphony Orches-
tra concert to be held at 8:30 p.-
m. Wednesday in Hill Auditorium
will be the world premiere of
"Concerto for Violin and Orches-
tra" composed by Prof. Ross Lee
Finney of the music school.
The concerto, which took 15
years to complete, is the first
Prof. Finney has composed. The
third movement is a medley based
on American folk tunes including
an original tune by Prof. Finney.
Prof. Wayne Dunlap of the mu-
sic school is conductor of the or-
chestra. The concert will be open
to the public free of charge.

Quinine Out for Pre-Exam-
Nerves, Dr. Bell Advises

f7E7'
S s
$' kr f E

Pre-exam jitters should not be
medicated with quinine treatment,
Dr. Margaret Bell, of Health Ser-
vice, has warned.
Commenting on a recommenda-
tion which appeared recently in a
Detroit Free Press column, Dr. Bell
declared that resorting to drugs
was a poor way to manage study
worries.
THE COLUMNIST, a medical
doctor, said that high school and
college students could prevent jit-
ters before an exam by taking cer-
tain amounts of quinine and thia-
mine regularly.
Although she said that the
writer was "usually pretty reli-
able," Dr. Bell strongly disagreed
with his treatment. "I question
his recommendation," she said.
"I am surprised that he should
advocate self medication."
Dr. Bell added that she was
"very much opposed to it" and
would never advise it for high

school or college students. "They
are not trained to figure out cor-
rect dosage."
* * *
THE DOCTOR agreed that a
small dose of quinine would do lit-
tle harm, but she pointed out that
such a dose would probably provide
no comfort for the harrassed stu-
dent.
Dr. Bell declaimed the trend of
reliance, on sedative drugs. We
need less medicinal treatment in
this area and more self-discipline,
she asserted.
Fulbright Award
Terence H. Benbow, Grad., has
been granted one of two Fulbright
Foreign Scholarships to be award-
ed in the state.
Benbow, a political science stu-
dent, will study political theory at
the University of Louvain in Bel-
gium.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

p

71

., i

:)

,A

Hotsy totsy,
Joy and cheer,
May 23,
GARG wil be here.

- - ....-.
MA~ICo
R!"AI

I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michiganfor which the Michig
Daily assumes no editorial respon si-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the Uni-
versity. Notices shoul be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3 p.m. on
the day preceding publication (II a.-
m. Saturdays).
THURSDAY, MAY 17, 1951
VOL. LXI, No. 158
Notices
Faculty and Students of the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts.
Members o the staff agd students are
expected to abide by the examination
schedule as published. The examina-
tion may not be placed earlier in the
schedule merely to meet the conven-
ience of the instructor and the stu-
dents. Individual members of the
staff who f i n d it necessary to
change the time of the examination,
because of other obligations, should se-
cure the written approval of the Chair-
man of the Department and of the
Dean, who will notify Prof. P. S. Dwyer,
Chairman of the Examination Commit-
tee.
Individual students who find it ne-
cessary to change the date of an ex-
amination must secure the approval of
their instructor and of Assistant Dean
Robertson.
Fund for the Advancement of Educa-
tion: Information concerning the fel-
lowship program for younger college
teachers, established by the Fund for
the Advancement of Education may be
secured at the office of Dr. Frank E.
Robbins, Assistant to the President,
2556 Administration Bldg.
All Coat Lockers located in t1Vp hall-
ways of the Chemistry Building will be
cleaned out at the end of the present
semester. Persons using these lockers
must remove all materials including
padlocks, from both the lockers and
the rods at the end of the lockers, by
June 18th to avoid having padlocks cut
off and the materials removed.
Selective Service
The deadline for receipt of Selective
Service College Qualification Test ap-
plications has been extended to May 25
by Selective Service. All applications
must be in the hands of Educational
Testing Service by May 25, 1951. This
applies to the July 12 date for those
students whose religious beliefs prevent
their taking the test on a Saturday, as
well as to the June 16 and June 30
testings. Applications are no longer
being processed for the May 26th test
and no further tickets can be issued
for May 26.
Students who wish to take the test
must secure, complete, and mail appli-
cations at once. Applications are
available at the Armed Services Infor-
mation Center, 555 Administration
Building, as well as at any local draft
board.
Selective Service Examination: Stu-
dents who have been instructed to re-
port to the Intramural' Sports Building
for the examination should report in-
stead to Waterman Gymnasium. The
Intramural Sports Building will not be
used.-
Students who have been instructed to
report to Room 130, School of Business
Administration, should do so.
Attention Veterans
Veterans who enroll here this summer
under the G. I. Bill will be processed
for Veterans Administration benefits at
the Veterans Service Bureau, Room 555,
basement Administration Building, in-
stead of Barbour Gymnasium as in the
past. Veterans are instructed to re-
port to Room 555 for lis processing as
soon as they obtain registration ma-
terials.
Senior Men: Union Life Memberships
may be picked up in the Union Busi-
ness Office between 8-5 p.m. All men
who have been full tuition students
for the equivalent of 8 semesters are
eligible.
To Students of the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts: The Stu-
dent Advisors will meet this Thurs.,
May 17, from 3 to 5 p.m., 1209 Angell
Hall. If time is not convenient and
you wish the phone number of any par-
ticular advisor, contact Alan Berson,
203 Weniey House, 24401, or at the
Student Legislature House, 34732.
Student organizations desiring to co-
sponsor films with the Student Legisla-
ture Cinema Guild during the Fall of
1951 should obtain a petition this week
at the Student Legislature Bldg., 122

South Forest, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Pe-
titions must be returned by Mon., May
28, at 5 p.m.
Annual French Play: The pictures
are ready, call for them in Room 112,
Romance Language Bldg.
Union Study Facilities on Sunday:
Because the General Library will not
be open, the Michigan Union will pro-
vide study facilities in rooms 3KLMN
and 3RS on Sun., May 20, between 1-6
p.m. All members and escorted guests
are welcome.
Summer Opportunities: Students in-
terested in summer employment will
have an opportunity to examine the
Bureau of Appointment's personnel re-
quests from camps, resorts, and in-
dustries, Thurs., May 17, 1 to 5 p.m.,
Room 3-B, Union.
Summer Employment:
A representative from Field Enter-
prises, Inc., a firm marketing Child-
craft, educational books for children,
will be interviewing interested students
for summer sales positions, Wed., May
23. Call Bureau of Appointments, Ext.
2614, for appointment.
Personnel Interviews:
Tuesday, May 22-
Wheeling Corrugating Company, Detroit
office, will be interviewing men for
sales positions and women for stenog-
raphy and typing. Men in the follow-
ing fields will qualify for the sales
positions: Psychology, Business Ad-
ministration, Economics, L S & A.
Wimsatt Brothers Company, Detroit,
will be interviewing men for sales po-
sitions. This company is a wholesale
building materials distributor.
Dearborn Motors, the farm equipment
division of Ford Motor Company, will
be interviewing accountants.
Wednesday, May 23--
Fargo Motor Corporation, the Fleet
Sales Division of Chrysler Corporation,
will be interviewinghmen for their sales
promotion training program.
For further information and appoint-
ments call at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments Bldg.
Personnel Requests:
The Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory,
Buffalo, New York, is in need of Phy-
sicists, Electronics Engineers, Applied
Mathematicians, Mechanical Engineers
and Administrators. This laboratory is
a non-profit research institute. Projects
are carried out by eight technical de-
partments: Physics, Wind Tunnel,
Flight Research, Aerodynamics, Aerome-
chanics Materials, Development Divi-
sion, and Special Projects.
The City of Berkley, Michigan is in
need of an Assistant City Engineer.
This work would include inspection of
paving projects, assisting in building
inspections, preparation of plans and
specifications, some city planning and
other general city work.
Bowes Industries, Inc., Chicago, is
looking for a Mechanical Engineer who
would work up to the assistant to the
Vice-President in charge of produc-
tion. He would eventually handle time
and motion study, cost analysis, design
of simple machines, design of modifi-
cations for existing machines and sup-
ervision of branch plant operations.
The Metal Specialty Company, Cin-
cinnati, is looking for an Industrial En-
gineer who would work in the En-
gineering Department which takes care
of estimating, tool design and tool
production, time study and production
engineering. The company is engaged
in the manufacture of stampings and
the molding of plastics.
The Cleveland Pneumatic Tire Com-
pany, Cleveland, is in need of Mechani-
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIEDADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline doily except
Saturday Is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
ROOMS FOR RENT
CLOSE TO CAMPUS-Clean, pleasant,
rooms for MALE students for summer
or fall. No smoking. Ph. 5372. )56R
ROOMS for summer school. Doubles
and singles. Student landlord. Near
Bus. Ad School. Call after 4 -- Ph.
2-7862. 940 Greenwood. )55R
ROOMS-Summer and Fall. Half block
to campus. 417 E. Liberty. )52R
ROOMS FOR MALE STUDENTS-One
double and one single near Law Club
and Bus. Ad. School. Continuous
hot water, showers. 808 Oakland.
Ph. 22858. )12R
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )iR
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
830 S. Main, 7590. )17B
TYPING - Accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Ph. 3-4040. )24B
FURRIER - Tailoring Queen Furriers.
417 E. Liberty. )23B
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced typist.-
Legal, master's, doctor's dissertations;
foreign manuscripts, etc. New Elec-
tromat typewriter, 513 E. William. Ph.
2-9848.-
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Serv-
ice Company, 215 E. Liberty. Guar-
anteed repair service on all makes of
typewriters.6B
TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS.
Sales, rentals and service. Morrill's,
314 S. State St. )4B
PERSONAL
ALICE L. HALL - Apologies; foul-up;
didn't see letter till Tuesday. Next
Monday? Same arrangements. Box 69.
Bradley Browne. )45P
KIDDIE KARE
RELIABLE SITTERS available. Phone
3-1121. )10B
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
122 E. Liberty -- Phone 8161 )2P
RAY HATCH will patch that match.
Learn to dance with
RAY HATCH DANCE STUDIO
209 S. State - Phone 5083 )4P

3 RM. FURN. APT. to. sub-lease for
summer-$60.00 per month. Call Dick
Neely, 3-4145. )22F
FOR SALE
MOTORCYCLE-1948 Indian "74" with
all the extras. Phone 8976. ) 97
HALLICRAFTER RADIO-Model S-40B,
cheap. Call 2-4401. 407 Chicago House.
j )96
TYPEWRITER-Almost new. Hermes
Baby. $50. Ph. YP 2760M. )95
WARDROBE TRUNK-Room for 6 suits,
3 dresses plus 4 large drawers. Low
price. Phone 3-1390. )94
BSA BANTAM 125 cc. motorcycle. 140
mi./gal. Less than yr. old. Dick
Kaplan, 3-4145. )98
1950 CHEVROLET CONVERTIBLE -
Black. All accessories. Low mileage.
Like new throughout. One owner. Pric-
ed for quick sale. Ph. 8760 after 5 p.m.
) 99
1937 PLYMOUTH COUPE - Good tires,
heater, -motor, body $50.00. 3DE 4637,
Berzin after 7:30 p.m. )92
U.S. NAVY T SHIRTS 49c; U. of M. "T"-
shirts $1.19; Khaki & grey wash pants
with zipper 3.95; genuine Levis $3.75.
Open until 6 P.M. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington. )5
FOR SALE-125 CC, B.S.A. M. Cycle,
1950. Top condition. Call Klein 2-7128.
) 93
J. H. COUSINS
ON STATE STREET
Sleeveless knitten cotton shirts with
a one-inch knitted rib trim on neck
and sleeve line. Four-inch bottom
cuff. $1.95. )3
GOLF CLUBS-Matched set Joe Kirk-
wood autograph clubs. 4 irons, 1 wood.
Never been used. $25.95. Ph. 2-8692.
)50
BABY BUDGIES or PARAKEETS $3.95
& $5.95 each. Tiny colorful finches
$5.95 a pair. Bird supplies. 562 S.
Seventh. Ph. 5330. )2

now

li

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Grey ski jacket on 8.U. or
If found call 6061.
FOR RENT

E.U.
)81L

4

LOST AND FOUND

THE ANN ARBOR DRAMA SEASON '

NOW PLAYING

FOR SALE
'39 FORD-4 door sedan. Heater, good
tires, $115. Phone Mr. Levitsky 2-2521,
Ext. 204, evenings 2-7517. )91
FOR SALE-European motorcycle-al-
most new. Cheap. Ph. 3-4100. )89
A~OLLEIFLEX, f 3.5 Tessar lens. Helland
solenoid and case. Excellent condi-
tion. Call Pete at 2-0026 after 7 p.m.
)72
EVERGREENS - Low spreading, bush,
upright. Junipers, arbor vitae, dwarf
pines, etc. Wholesale prices. M. Lee,
1208 Chemistry or Tel 8574 mornings.
)1
WHIZZER BIKE-Excellent condition.
$100 or less. Ph. Ypsi 3003W. )86
HELP WANTED
DRIVER SALESMAN on Coop Dairy
routes. Detroit area. Person able, to
meet public & interested in coopera-
tives preferred. Union wages. Write to:
Coop. Dairy Service, 962 Eureka, Wyn-
dotte, Mich. )48H
WANTED TO RENT
APARTMENT - Modern unfurnished.
Next Fall. Write Mr. Irwin, 1331 Wash-
tenaw. )13W
MARRIED Dental Student desires fur-
nished, unfurnished apartment. Call
306 Winchell House (2-4401) after 7:00.
)12W
APARTMENT for' summer or part. First
floor, furnished, near campus. Call
2-4887. )11W
APARTMENT-For next fall. Preferably
unfurnished. Married student & wife.
Ph. 2-4591, 300 Prescott, EQ. )1oW
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS for Summer Session-Luxurious
accommodations at fraternity house.
Phone Dave at 7039. )53R
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies' garments.
Catherine St. near State. 2-2878. A.
Graves. )1A
ROOM AND BOARD
COMFORTABLE well-furnished rooms,
innersprings, showers, linens furnish-
ed, good food, home cooking. Phone
2-6422. )59R

.:1
.

EDNA BEST

:k

A-

....:......

JOHN ARCHER

in
"CAPTAIN BRASSBOUND'S CONVERSION"
by George Bernard Shaw
Matinee Today at 3:15-Evenings at 8:30
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Also
SPORT - NEWS - CARTOON

S

U

.!:.

dry cleaning
at its Best!

LOST IN ANGELL HALL-Parker 51 pen,
maroon & silver. Please call or re-
turn to Administration Bldg. lost &
found. Reward. Phone 2547 Alice Lloyd
3-1561. )45L
FREE
REMINGTON Factory Repair
Men will be at Ulrich's this
Thurs., Fri., and Sat. to CLEAN,
OIL and ADJUST your Rem-
ington Razor.
Free of charge -
$7.50 in trade for your
old Electric Razor
UlriC's Book Store
f -
.9
{4k
t
e

tw

t

o

:.-

All garments CAREFULLY handled

.Ia Ca4r
Featuring Genuine
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI
and RAVIOLI
with
Salad, Rolls, Coffee
Also
SANDWICHES and
SHORT-ORDERS

The 1951
ROSE BOWL
MICHIGANENSIAN

h;

t-O Special attention to SPOTS

} Finest PRESSING

T ry our THRIFTY STUDENT BUNDLE

1.~.~

1

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