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May 10, 1951 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1951

14 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

T lE MTC ( lAN DALY A(

,L ^% ll L L

N THE SPOT
By GEORGE FLINT
A WELL-BUILT YOUNG MAN with a slight limp walked quietly
toward the visitors' dugout in Briggs Stadium the other day.
From his demeanor, you might have thought he was a veteran of
mnany staid and businesslike seasons with the New York Yankees. He
acted that way. His expressionless face, the easy way he'd just picked
off a wind-blown fly ball, the graceful stride he broke into when
backing up a play t first-all gave him the look which is associated
with the Bronx Bombers.e
AND HIS NAME WAS Mickey Mantle, the Yankees' freshest
freshman and the highy-heralded heir-apparent to the crown of
Joseph P. DiMaggio.
He was only one of four rookies or near-rookies who stood out
in New York's 11-6 win over the Bengals. Although he looked the
best of the lot, the general play of the quartet was good enough
to elicit a renewed "Break up the Yankees!" wail from other
American League ball parks.
Mantle, who is a switch hitter and has the scampering speed of a
slightly stocky gazelle, had three hits for the afternoon. One was a
clean single from the port side, off Old Diz Trout. Another was a
well-executed drag bunt which was successful because of his great
speed.
ITH LEFTY EARL JOHNSON pitching, the young man from
Oklahoma whose shin injury has eliminated him from military call
slashed a single to center--this time right-handed-which brought
in two New York runs.
The other three Yankee fledglings-Gil MacDougald, Jackie
Jensen, and pitcher Tom Morgan, were nearly as effective.
In atonement for an early error which presented the Tigers with
an unearned run, Jensen uncorked a tremendous throw from center-
field (he was subbing for the injured DiMaggio) which nipped Gerry
Priddy at third base. He also got one hit, comedown from his recent,
fence-busting parade.
*' * **
YOUNG MAC DOUGALD, a skinny but quick third baseman with
a fancy spring-training average, was effortless in the field in his brief
appearance. He came in for Bobby Brown after the Tigers got down
as far as Johnson ;in their relief barrel, and played effortless ball
afield. His peculiar batting style (a variation on the sledgehammer
stance of Detroit's Priddy) yielded one double in two times at bat.
Morgan is the big hope in the New York team's weakest de-
partment. He looked cool under fire, yielding five hits in the five
ininngs he worked. A lanky, grim-looking right-hander with the
shuffling walk of an Arkansas hilbilly, his control and fair amount
of speed could bolster Stengel's wavering mound staff.
Although the veterans are still around-the names that have
made headlines for the past five years-the Yankees are beginning
* lo take on all the appearance of a young and vigorous club. The talent
their .vast farm system has handpicked looks like bad news to the
teams which had hoped to shatter the supremacy of the team of Ruth
and Gehrig.
Last 'Year the New Yorkers won the pennant on a handful of
crippled Old Pros. This season they may well do it on a prize parcel of
rookies.

Newhouser Halts Senators,

4-0'

'M' Class Visits Tioers

,I

Giants Wallop Cardinals, 1
DodgersSqueeze by Cubs,

7-3;
-54

By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Hal Newhouser of
the Detroit Tigers scattered seven
hits to shut out the Washington
Senators, 4-0, yesterday and win
his second game of the season.
Steve Souchock started his sec-
ond game for the Tigers and blast-
ed a homer, one of the only three
hits the Tigers got off Washing-
ton's Al Sima in the first seven
innings.
DETROIT, winning its third
straight for its longest winning
streak this season, bunched four
successive singles off relief pitch-
er Joe Haynes in the eighth inn-
ing for two more runs.
Newhouser, 29-year-old left
hander who lost his first two
games this season, never was in
trouble until the ninth inning.
Gil Coan led off with a double
in the ninth and Irv Noren
singled to left, but Newhouser
got out of the hole with the
help of a quick double play.
Souchock singled and blasted a
370-foot homer into the\upper left
field stands for two of Detroit's
seven hits. Sima suffered his sec-
ond defeat against one win.
Detroit's first run came after
Vic Wertz walked and moved to
third on Souchock's single and a
walk in the second inning. John-
ny Lipon drove a long fly to center
to score Wertz. Souchock's homer
made it 2-0 in the fourth. De-
troit scored twice in the eighth.
GIANTS 17, CARDS 3
NEW YORK-The New York
Giants took advantage of a weak-
ened, make-shift St. Louis lineup
yesterday and proceeded to crush
the limping Cardinals, 17-3.
In their biggest power dis-
play of the season, the Giants
pounded four St. Louis flingers
for 21 hitsthat included two
home runs by catcher Ray
Noble, a four-bagger by Bob
Thomson and a double and
triple by Captain Alvin Dark.
With this blitz barrage going
for him, Sal Maglie breezed to his
third straight victory.
Everybody in the Giants' start-
ing lineup got into the hit and
run parade. Dark, Noble and
Whitey Lockman poled four safe-
ties apiece as the Giants tied the
season's Major League club high
for hits and runs.
DODGERS 5, CUBS 4
BROOKLYN-A timely double
by Cal Abrams and snappy relief
pitching by Clyde King gave the
Brooklyn Dodgers a 5-4 victory
over the Chicago Cubs yesterday.
King scattered six hits over
eight innings to pick up his sec-
ond victory against one defeat.
Abrams snapped a 2-all tie in
the sixth inning with a two-out,
two-run double. The Dodgers
picked up another run in that
inning, and it proved to be just
enough as the Cubs closed fast
with single runs in the eighth and
ninth innings.
King r eplaced starter Johnny
Van Cuyk in the second after the
tall lefthander had given up two
Major
League
Standings

runs in the first on two singles, a
ground out and Andy Pafko's
long triple.
PHILS 6, PIRATES 5
PHILADELPHIA - Ed Pella-
grini's 10th inning single with two
out drove Eddie Waitkus home
with the run that gave the Phila-
delphia Phillies a 6-5 victory over
the Pittsburgh Pirates last night.
BRAVES 4, REDS 0
BOSTON - Righthander Vern
Bickford limited the Cincinnati
Reds to two hits last night while
gaining his fifth straight victory
and second shutout for the Boston
Braves by a 4-0 margin.

HAL NEWHOUSER
... wins second

Grid Squad
Loses Canty
For Season
Wolverine quarterback Norm1
Canty will be absent from the
remaining spring grid drills be-
cause of a slight recurrence of aj
brain concussion.
The promising sophomore back
from Chicago, Illinois, should be
able to participate in drills next
autumn. He first suffered a brain
concussion in last fall's practice.
4. * *
HOWEVER, he recovered suffi-
ciently to come out for the be-
ginning of spring football prac-
tice last month. Approximately
one week ago Canty complained
of head pains and was subse-
quently sent to University Hos-
pital.
The doctors checked thor-
oughly, but found no evidence
of a new brain concussion.
Therefore he was released yes-
terday afternoon and saw the
afternoon's grid drills. To be
on the safe side Canty will miss
the remaining few days of work.
In this spring's work Canty has
performed to advantage, looking
extremely promising. Coach Ben-
nie Oosterbaan and his staff
should be greatly relieved over
Canty's quick improvement.
- - -

By A. B. CHARLIP
How would you like a lab as-
signment that called for seeing
the Detroit Tigers play the Wash-
ington Senators?
That's what the Sports Surve'
classes of the Men's Physical Ed-
ucation were "forced" to do.
* * *'
AT NOON yesterday 20 students
boarded a University bus, and
headed for Briggs!Stadium in De-
troit. They were guests of the
Detroit Tiger Baseball Company.
Accompanying the students on
this unprecedented trip were
members of thePhysical Educa-
tion Department. They were Dr.
Mitchell, Professors Livesay and
Rigan, and Mr. Van Why.
The Sports Survey course was
instituted at the University in
the fall of 1948. The University
of Michigan was the first school
to offer the course as part of a

service program in physical edu-
cation.
One of the main objectives of
the course is to develop within
the student an understanding and
appreciation of various sports ac-
tivities. Mr. Van .Why, the in-
structor of the course, felt that
his students would get a better
appreciation of baseball by seeing
a Major League ball game. For
some of the students it was the
first Major League ball game thai
they had ever seen.
All those-who attended the game
expressed their gratitude to the
University and to the Detroit Tig-
er Baseball Company for provid-
ing them with an entertaining and
educational afternoon.
"

DEADLOCK IN SIGHT:
Big Ten Meeting Will Decide
Fate of Rose Bowl Agreement.

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By ROGER GREENBERG
Prospects aren't too bright for
the renewal of the Big Ten's Rose
Bowl agreement with the Pacific
Coast as things now stand.
The big decision will be made
at the Conference meeting which
begins at Chicago on May 24th.
A simple 6-4 majority will be
needed to renew the pact, but,
insiders are saying that it will not
be forthcoming. Several week's
ago Michigan's athletic director,
Herbert 0h(Fritz) Crisler predict-
ed the end of the pact.
SAM Defeats
ThetaChi, 6-3
Sigma Alpha Mu defeated Theta
Chi, 6-3, yesterday behind the
seven-hit pitching of Irv Toboc-
man to gain the semi-final round
in the fraternity I-M softball
play-offs.
The Sammies will meet one of
three other unbeaten teams in
semi-final play next week. Sigma
Phi Epsilon, Pi Lambda Phi, and
Phi Delta Theta had already
earned spots in the play-offs by
recording quarter-final victories
in action earlier this week.
Tobocman walked only three
men while his teammates touched
Loser George Steele for nine safe-
ties. Sigma Alpha Mu sewed up
the decision with a four-run sec-
ond inning.
Beta Theta Pi out-scored Kap-
pa Sigma, 15-10, in a consolation
bracket game yesterday.
Scores in other intramural ac-
tion:
SOFTBALL
Psychology 19, English 1.
Museum 12, Zoology 3.
Speech 14, Dental Mat. Lab. 11.
Psi Omega def. ASPA by forfeit.
TENNIS
Phi Epsilon Kappa 3, Delta Sigma
Pi 0.
Law Club 3, Alpha Chi Sigma 0.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 3, Chi Phi 0.

STANDING in the way of any
renewal is wide disagreement
over whether a Big Ten team
should be allowed to visit the
Rose Bowl once in two years, or
only once in three years. The old
pact which expired with Michi-
gan's victory this year, limited
schools to only one Rose bowl trip
in three years.
The Pacific Coast Conference
is demanding that the Big Ten
provide for the one-in-two plan
in any future agreement. Mich-
igan State, a strong bowl sup-
porter, will definitely vote for
this proposal, and has already
made an announcement to this
effect. Ohio State, Iowa and
Indiana, will also give it their
support.
Michigan, which last week vot-
ed to send Faculty Representative
Ralph W. Aigler to the meeting
with an uninstructed vote" will
also hesitatingly vote for the one-
in-two pact rather than see the
agreement not renewed at all. The
Wolverines, who were the only
Big Ten school to visit Pasadena
twice under the old 5-year pact,
are seemingly strong Rose Bowl
supporters.
Minnesota, Northwestern, Wis-
consin, and Purdue appear to be
against renewal in any form, while
Illinois will side with the pact
only with the one-in-three pro-
vision.
LATE BASEBALL SCORE
Athletics 8, Browns 2
CRE1W CUTS
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New York 15
washington 12
Cleveland 11
Chicago 10
Detroit 9
Boston 10
St. Louis
Philadelphia 5

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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 9, Cleveland 2
Detroit 4, Washington 0
* * *
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New York 17, St. Louis 3
Brooklyn 5, Chicago 4
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