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May 08, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-08

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GI
PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 8, 1951

Peaceful Israeli Border

Enthusiastic
Callers Spur
River Jaunt
Looks like Mary Ellin McCrady'si
long dreamed-of raft trip down
the Mississippi is going to be a re-1
ality this summer.
In response to a story in Satur-
day's Daily, Miss McCrady, '51,
has got one definite- promise
from a Men's Glee Club member, a
tentative promise from another
University male, a host of helpful
pointers from a student who has
made similar trips and calls frotn
other interested adventure seek-
ers.
The Men's Glee Club member,
Don Brown, Grad., will take the
trip primarily because of his in-
terest in social psychology. Brown,
who is interested in small groups,
added he's also out for adventure.
The helpful pointers were re-
ceived from Tony Baker, '54, a
West Quadder who has made a
hobby of taking trips on the barest
of essentials. He gave Miss Mc-
Crady tips on construction of the
raft, how to estimate expenses and
possible contacts the group can
make on its journey.
One call, from Gayle Greene
'54A, a Daily tryout, didn't pan
out. Miss Greene who doesn't
swim, was afraid of the rivers'
depths.
Miss McCrady still has openings
for two or three more. Anyone
interested can contact her at
2-4819.

HOMEMADE SUBWAY:
DirtFlies as Sandhog Has His Day

A common mole may be in the
dark most of the time, but Hank
Melton, '52NR, thinks the little
punk is pretty wide awake- when
it comes to ruining his backyard.
"From the tunnel network in
my yard I can just about tell
where this -sandhog's been and
where he's going. He uses his
keen sense of smell as a compass
Dorm Survey
To Distribute
Questionnaires
Questionnaires on food, service,'
facilities and staff in residence
halls will be distributed next week
among all students living in dor-
mitories.
The survey was approved by the
Board of Governors of Residence
Halls last week and since then the
questionnaire has been drawn up
and is being printed.
The committee plans to band
out the questionnaires to the dorm
representatives at a meeting next
week and the students will receive
them at that time.
Dave Guttentag, '53E, head of
the survey committee, hopes to
have all the completed question-
naires ready for computation by
the end of the 15th week. The re-
sults will be computed as quickly
as possible, he said,' so action can
be taken.

to track down tasty earthworms-
and from the looks of it he doesn't
waste much time about it."
BUT MELTON realizes that in
wrecking his ground the mole is
really doing him a favor.
"I try to look on the bright
side of this thing and try to
understand that he's really
aerating the soil by turning it
over as he digs. But I do wish
he'd do somebody else this fa-
vor-I just don't appreciate it."
Although Melton knows the
weak eyes of the mole are a de-
cided handicap in keeping him
posted on what's happening above
ground, he feels the mole should
stop making such an upheaval
about it.
* * *
"YOU CAN TELL just by look-
ing at his shovel-shaped paws and
long, broad muzzle that he was
built for subterranean scouting.
And his pinpoint eyes are prac-
tically covered with fur for pro-
tectioh from the loose dirt. But

just because he's half-blind is no
reason he should be excused for
wrecking other people's property."
Moles seldom come to the sur-
face except at noon for a quick
look, and then they quickly dis4
appear into their tiny hide-
aways.
"Nobody seems to know why
they pick the noon hour to do
this-maybe because it's usuall'y
so bright, they can see a little bet-
ter. They can barely distinguish
dark from light, you know," Mel-
ton said.
But the one thing Melton doelt
admire about his arch-building
enemy is his underground haven,
which he thinks is a masterpiece
of architectural design.
}
"He digs many passageways
leading away from his nest so he
can take out after his prey. Tha#s
pretty clever, really, but his clev-
erness is getting on my nerves. yA
few more tunnels like these and
somebody's really going to get
hurt." -
.- ..'.A- >%x>x".W * * r"* w,

SETTING UP NATIONAL BORDER-Surveyor checks line dividing Israel and Jordan as Arabs (cen-
ter) wait with whitewash brush to mark pile of rocks as borders. But all was not quiet on the north-
ern frontier where Israeli and Syrian troops have been battling for a week in a border dispute.

OPERA TION

4006:

Speech Students To Give
Mock RadioBroadcast

0 1

Students in radio speech courses
will begin two days of simulated
broadcasting today and tomorrow
when they undertake Operation
4006, the speech department's
spring climax to the semester's
radio instruction.
Named for the room number of
the department's Studio A on the
fourth floor of Angell Hall, the
exercise is designed to acquaint
radio students with the problems
of continuous broadcasting o all
Medical Educators
Plan Visit to Japani
Dr. Malcolm H. Soule and Dr.
Maurice H. Seevers, of the medi-
cal school, will be among a group
of 12 faculty members from 10'
universities participating in a me-
dical education mission to Japan
this month.
The group is scheduled to arrive
In Japan Monday for a month's
consultation with professors in a
dozen Japanese medical schools.
The trip is being made under the
sponsorship of the Unitarian Serv-
ice Committee at the request of
the Allied Powers command.

__ _
I

IL

PEN HOSPITAL
115 W. Liberty St.

types of programs, as in actual
radio station operation.
WITH NO ATTEMPT made to
satirize real broadcasts, the Oper-
ation has reduced a regular net-
work affiliated station's 12 hour
daily schedule to four hours by
making programs one-third their
usual length.
Actual broadcast time will be
from 3:30 to 5:30 and 7:30 to
9:30 p.m. in order to interfere
with a minimum of students'
classes.
Although the shows will not go
out over the air, they will be ac-
curately timed and studio en-
gineers have instructions to cut
off programs which run over their
a'lloted time.
ADJUSTING THE program fare
offered to the simulated broad-
cast time, the first show at 3:30
p.m. will be the variety usually
heard at 10 a.m. This policy will
be followed throughout the two
days broadcasting, -- m o r n i n g
"wake-up" shows, afternoon soap
dramas, evening comedy and quiz
programs will follow in their usual
order.
Students in radio writing
courses have written all the
scripts for the two-day workout
and students in advance courses
will direct the programs and
handle sound effects. Begin-
ping radio students will handle
station breaks and announcing
jobs.
Since the department's two
studios would be insufficient to
house all the programs and re-
hearsals, studio control rooms,
class rooms and offices on the
fourth floor have been pressed
into service as temporary broad-
casting locations and have been
equipped with microphones.
Room 4203 will be open both
days for anyone interested in lis-
tening to the programs.
Phoenix Pledges
Students who wish to pay all or
part of their pledge to the Phoenix
Project may do so between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. today at 4545 Adminis-
tration Building, according to
Marvin Lubeck, '51, chairman.
HILLEL
SPRING
WEEKEND
May 11, 12,113

Africa Topicl
Of ASPPanel
"Africa-Colonial Crisis and the
Future" will be the topic of a.
panel discussion to be held at 8
p.m. today in Kellogg Auditorium.
T h r e e University students,
Pierre Carmona, '52E, of Egypt;
Festo Ojehomgn, of Nigeria, and
L. Naidoo, of the Union of South
Africa, will comprise the panel.
Chairman of the program in
which the audience will have an
opportunity to participate will be
the Rev. David Blake.
Today's meeting, which is un-
der the sponsorship of the campus
Council of the Arts, Sciences and
Professions, is open to the public.
Lecturer To Give
Speech on Names
The academic side of "What's
in a name?" will be discussed at
4:15 p.m. today in Rm. 1025 An-
gell Hall.
The lecture, "Sense and Deno-
tation of Names," will be present-
ed by Prof. Alonzo Church, of
Princeton University.
Prof. Church is on the board of
editors of the Journal of Symbolic
Logic. The journal was co-edited
for many years by Prof. Church
and Prof. C. Langford, of the phi-
losophy department.
Seniors To Cut-up

r

4
i
i
t
F
f
i
i

Join the student group this summer
to Rotterdam on the S. S. VOLEN-
DAM, host to over 4000 students on
three annual sailings since 1948. Re-
turn sailing September 5 from
Rotterdam. ,
Dormitory type accommodations.
Plenty of deck space. Large, public
rooms. Good and plentiful menu.
High standards of Dutch seaman-
ship,'cleanliness, and traditional
friendliness.

Staff of 20 distinguished EuroPean
and American lecturers, under the
joint direction of Netherlands Office
for Foreign Student Relations and
U. S. National Student Association
offer a comprehensive Orientations
Program enroute.
Round Trp for dormitory-
hi liiitype space. $320 for mmii.
fl5*0 tiple-berth cabins for
women.
Applications from bona fide college
students only are being accepted by

S.S.VOLENDAM
TO
ISUy EUROPEi
"Thrifty" Co-ed Student Sailing

NETHERLANDS OFFICE FOR FRIEIGN STUDENT RELATIONS
29 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y.
Agents for the Ministerie van Verkeer en Waterstaat
(Directorate-General of Shipping) The Hague. Netherlands

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Senior men will be given the
opportunity, starting tomorrow,
to carve up a table in the Union
taproom.,
Tools will be available in the
basement checkroom upon presen-
tation of ID cards.
CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
Fully Accredited
An Outstanding College in
a Splendid Profession
Entrance requirement thirty
semester hours of credits in
specified courses. Advanced
standing granted for addi-
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Registration N'ow Open
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