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May 08, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MAY 8, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE'

Hillel Plans Spring Weekend
As Sample of Year's Program

Events
Benefit

To Include Dance, Picnic, Outing,
Carnival for United Jewish Appeal

Friday through Sunday this
weekend will be the Hillel Spring
)Veekend.
The planned series of events will
present to Michigan students a
xample of the many and varied
phases of Hillel's program
throughout the year.
* * *
INCLUDED IN this weekend are
dome of the cultural, social and,
religious aspects of the Hillel pro-
gram.
' After the Sabbath services,
wh!h begin at 7:30 p.m. Friday
evening a Dramatic Club read-
'ing of the "Don Juan in Hell"
scene from "Man and Super-
man" by George Bernard Shaw
will be given.
Saturday at 2:30 p.m. will be a
picnic and outing at the Island,
at which students will participate
Victor Named
In adminton
Jean Mallory is this year's win-
ner of the WAA singles badminton
tournament:.
The final game was played Fri-
gay at Barbour Gymnasium.
Sue Huber took second place
honors. Tournament runners-up
Were Janet Dewey and Marian'
Swanson.
Tournament winners will re-
delve 25 points for first place, 15
points for second, and 10 for third
place. These points will be count-
ed in awarding the participation
cup and recogniti n certificates on
I,antern Night, May 21.
In the final games of the tour-
nament, the winner had to win
tro out of three games.
Approximately 100 coeds played
in the tournament which was be-
gun in March and managed by
Mona Pick.
Formula for Success
Add Katharine Gibbs secretarial train-
ing to your college education! With this
combination, you're prepared to go far
ii any' business or profession.
'ri CeItw Coune Dean for catatog
Katharine Gibbs
n0P Prk Ave *, NEW YORK Il 33 Plymouth St., MONTCLAIR
rI. UporSt, CICAGOl1 15kAngef St.. PROVIDENCE 6
S9 Marbrough St.. BOSTON 16

' in various outdoor gamesa
sports.
[ THE ANNUAL Hillel Spr
Dance will be held at 8 p.m., &
urday at WAB. The dance isE
titled "Spring Fling" and the d
orations will carry out a spri
theme.
Doris Iser and Jack Hains a
co-social chairmen in charge4
the dance.
The highspot of the weeke
will be the United Jewish App
Carnival and State Day Progr

and
ing
>at-
en-
ec-
Ing
re
of
end
leal
am

beginning at 2:30 p.m. Sunday on
the lawn of the Tau Delta Ph
house, 2015 Washtenaw.
THIS CELEBRATION will be in
honor of the anniversary of the
birth of the state of Israel. IZFA
will present a program commem-
orating State Day.
Fraternities, sororities and or-
ganized independent groups wil
set up booths for the carnival, and
a cup will be awarded to the priz
booth. Proceeds from the carni-
val will be donated to the United
Jewish Appeal.
No admission will be charged
for the weekend's activities, except
the dance on Saturday. The dance
admission is $1.50 per couple.
"The events are open to all'stu-
dents on campus," said Al Fried-
man, president of Hillel Student
Council.
Stars To Shine
At Tennis Ball
Stars will twinkle over dancers
at the WAA and Union sponsored
Tennis Ball on the Palmer Field
tennis courts from 9 to midnight
Friday, May 18.
The dance will be one of the
first events planned for the co-
sponsored weekend that is held
evry year. Music for the dance
will be provided by Ted Smith's
orchestra.
Dress for the dance will be in-
formal, with emphasis on cottons
for the coeds.
Refreshments'will be served dur-
ing the dance and entertainment
is being planned for intermission
time.
Tickets for the dance will go on
sale beginning Monday, May 14,
at the Union and Administration
Bldg. They will also be sold-on
the diagonal and in the quads.
The dance on the tennis courts
will be one of the many activities
for the weekend. Also planned are
an arb party and Wolverun Derby.
Tickets for the dance will cost
$1.50.

i
n
e
I
d
e
t
e
t

't
l

Mortar Board
Will Dedicate
Drama Library
Women on Campus.
To Aid Financing
Of Dean's Memorial
A library of outstanding drama
collections in honor of Alice
Crocker Lloyd is the new project
of the members 'of Mortar Board.
The group is planning to place
this collection, along with a por-
trait of Miss Lloyd and a parch-
ment telling of her achievements,
in a prominent section of the
League Library.
* * *
IN ORDER to finance this proj-
ect, Mortar Board is asking each
woman on campus to contribute
20 cents, or more if she wishes, to
the fund.
The president of every wo-
man's housing group on campus
has sent a letter by Mortar
Board informing her of this pro-
ject and she has been request-
ed to collect the contributions,.
This memorial is being given
because Miss Lloyd had an intense
interest in drama and literature
and was one of the founders of
the Spring Drama Season here.
* * *
PROF. VALENTINE WINDT of
the Speech Department recom-
mended a list of names of books
for the collection.
Prof. Kenneth Rowe of the
English' Department helped
compile a list of books that he
knew Miss Lloyd especially en-
joyed and would have wanted
included in the collection.
Now the members of Mortar
Board have a complete list of the
dramas and anthologies that they
hope to buy.
"If the project is not completed
this year, future generations of
Mortar Board will continue it,"
said Renee Pregulman, chairman
of Mortar Board's project commit-
tee.
Miss Pregulman, Barbara Moly-
neaux and Val Lemper are organ-
izing the project.

PAEwV

By MARY JEAN FOLEY
Perfume, although a tradition-
al gift for various occasions, usual-
ly provides a boost to the feminine
spirit.
A woman wears perfume pro-
ducts to express her personality,
to make her feel feminine and
wanted, to surround herself in an
aura of fragrance to attract other
people, fashion experts say. How-
ever, they add, American women
still use perfume and perfume pro-
ducts too sparingly.
MANY WOMEN consider it a
luxury and it is kept only for
Sundays and special occasions or
applied to a hankie or dabbed be-
hind the ears. This notion, they
say, is old fashioned.
Perfume is part of a woman's
everyday costume. It is the hid-
den accessory. Many women do
not realize, however, the many
other ways fragrance can add
pleasure to their daily lives.
"Why limit fragrance to the bou-
doir?" the experts ask.
Many other rooms in the house
can benefit from its magic touch.
FOR INSTANCE, to compliment
the bright, clean look of the sink
after a good scrubbing, spray a
little cologne into it, and turn on
the hot water.
In the !dining and living rooms
the tops of the light bulbs may
be sprayed with perfume. When
the light warms the bulbs your
favorite scent will dominate the
room. Tucking small pieces of
scented cotton behind sofa and
chair cushions add to the ef-
fect.
With warm weather coming up
a few new tricks may be helpful.
To spray bed pillows early in the

evening is a relaxing and refresh-
ing idea; or on very hot nights,
place a bowl of ice cubed sprinkled
with cologne before an electric fan.
Another suggestion is to add a
drop of perfume to cigarettes and
listen to the pleasing comments.
Experts advise a perfume with
a light, flowery base for spring
and' summer. Rose, jasmine and
lily of the valley have proved to
be favorites in past years.
Ie j
pportunity
Unlimited. ..
For men of high caliber and
I university training, Douglas I
offers limitless opportunity.
Today, as for the ptast thirty
years, our future depends on
men who can continue to
I help pioneer in the field of
aeronautics.
University and college gradu-
ates have made important con-
tributions to our progress, and
have found Douglas a good
place to work.
As we push forward the
development of aircraft,
guided missiles, and special
classified projects for the
Government, we shall always
be interested in men trained
as aeronautical, mechani-
cal, electrical and civil
engineers. .physicists...
and mathematicians.
DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT
COMPANY, INC.
I SANTA MONICA, j
t CALIFORNIA

COMMON SCENTS:
Experts on Fragrance Object
Perfume Used Too Sparingly

-Daily-Roger Reinke,
FRATERNITY WEEKEND-The Fiji marching band, directed by Neal Traves, announces the open-
ing of Fraternity Weekend, and also puts in a plug for IFC Ball. The parade of Fiji's across campus
was led by Cy Carlton and Sandy Robertson.
Netord oSe 'SeWal * *
NextO Wol To SeCene forF Bal Friday

I

The music of Harry James and
his orchestra and an atmosphere
that is "out of this world" will
mark this year's IFC Ball.
The Cance will be presented Fri-
day from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. in the
IM Building.
* * *
IT WILL BE "Hellish," but
there will also be a touch of
"Heaven," since the decorations
are being planned around the
theme of the nether world.
The walls wil be hung with
dark blue drapes to give the
effect of outer space, and be-
tween these will be hung white
drapes upon which motion pic-
tures of blue clouds and shoot-
ing flames will be flashed.

One side of the room will be
decorated to depict "Hell." Murals
of horned devils, fire and brim-
stone, shooting flames and other
"devilish" features will carry out
the mood.
* * *
"HEAVEN" WILL be represent-
ed on the other side of the room.
Here angels will flit about amid
fluffy white clouds.
A crystal shower ball will
hang from the center of the
ceiling to top off the decora-
tions.
Harry James and his Music Ma-
kers will play from a red and white
bandstand. The musical program
for the evening will be designed to
appeal to everyone. There will be

Career

Woman Gives Advice

On Use of Male Psychology

soft, dreamy music for the roman-
tic and "hot," swing stuff for the
"jivy" element.
* * *
RECENTLY ACCLAIMED Am-
erica's Number One Swing Band,
it is amusing to note that about
sixty per cent of the band's cur-
rent repertoire comes under the
heading of "sweet music."
James originally won popu-
larity with hot jazz music but
the band has become more and
more diversified in the past few
years
Trombones, trumpets, rhythm
instruments and reeds now com-
pose, the Music Makers.
BOOTHS WILL BE set up
around the room where couples
can relax and talk between dances.
During intermision the wo-
men selected by the fraternities
to represent them at the dance
will be honored in a mass cere-
mony and presented with cor-
sages.
Tickets for the dance are priced
at $3.60 per couple, and they are
now on sale in the Administration
Building aiid on the diagonal.
rBusiness Cdreers
THE
COLLEGE
4-MONTH INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING for
COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUATES
Starting June, October, February
Bulletin A, on request.
Registration now open.
NEXT COURSE STARTS JUNE 11
'Lifetime Placement Service
Write Admission Counselor
Co-Educational " G. L Approved
THE GREGG COLLEGE
South Wabash Avenue, Chicago 3, Iliinois
-Phone STate 2-1880

Save for
a Rome
in an insured savings ac-
count here, and, when you
have the down payment,
ask about our home-
financing plan. Savings in-
sured to $10,000.
2% current rate

I

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

MOTHlER'S DAY is May 13!

A

Lk

We have the blouse to flatter
your Mother. Beautiful blouses
in nylon, batiste, shantung, or-
gundy, piqu6, linen. Sizes 30
to 38.

U

By LORRAINE BUTLER
"Women know men better than
they know themselves," says Edna
Williams, one of America's first
traveling saleswomen.
Miss Williams asserted that any
woman knows how to keep a man
in his place and keep him from
making a fool of himself.
IT WAS BACK in 1898 when
Miss Williams first went to work.
In those days the idea of a woman
taking up a career was considered
very daring.
She began her career by
working for a cocoa manufac-
turing company. Her salary was
$10 per week. The company was
undertaking a new experiment
at the time.
The experiment turned out to
be an advertising stunt. The stunt
consisted of sending young wo-
men to stores, fairs and exhibits
to demonstrate how easy it was
to brew a pot of the company's
product.
* * *
"THEY DRESSED us in the cos-
tume of the company's trade-
mark," Miss Williams recalled.
She said the company looked out
for the women's welfare, by see-
ing that they were provided with
chaperones wherever they went.
Miss Williams commented
t h at occasionally a "wolf"
would attempt to date her while
she was on duty, but she insist-
ed that she found them easy to
handle.
Sometimes an especially daring
man would call on the telephone,
with the familiar line of "didn't
we meet in Youngstown." Miss
Williams related that she took
care of this kind of male by saying
she was sorry but she had never
been in Youngstown.
"ONCE A MAN broke down and
said he was just lonesome and
wouldn't I please have dinner with
him. And I said that I might have
-if he had shown any originality
in trying to get an introduction,"
Miss Williams admitted.
In all her 35 years of travel-
ing, Miss Williams said that nev-
er once was she embarrassed or
annoyed by over-enthusiastic

males. She explained that this
type of man need cause no trou-
ble.'
"A woman soon learns how to
flag down that sort of thing," she
said. "If she wants to go out
with men, it is easy enough to do
it, but if she shows from the be-
ginning that she is not interested,
the men are the first to respect
her wishes."
MISS WILLIAMS retired in
1937 after spending nearly 40
years of her life living out of
suitcases in hotel rooms. She said
that now she is busier than ever.
How does she spend her time?
"I joined some clubs, and I
took some courses and I learned
to swim," Miss Williams said.
She swims a couple of times a
week, and to this she attributes
her fine health and youthful ap-
pearance.
* * *
RECENTLY M i s s Williams
wrote to the headquarters of the
firm which now owns the com-
pany for which she worked to of-
fer them some of her old cos-
tumes, in which she advertised
cocoa in her younger days.
When Miss Williams was
asked what she would like in
return for the gift of the cos-
tumes, she explained that she
would like a long service pin, an
award which was not in use at
the time of her retirement.
Since an award of that kind
would be a bit irregular, the board
of directors passed a special regu-
lation.
This provided that the award
of a long service pin should be
given to any retired female em-
ployee of the company who was
75 years old-and who swims regu-
larly.
Menu Suggestion
For menus both esthetically and
gastronomically "tops," the House-
hold Information Service suggests
foods with contrasting color, fla-
vor, and texture. Mint jelly, dried
parsley flakes, paprika, cranber-
ry sauce, or spiced crab apples may
be used to accent the main dish.

They can be found
at

116 North Fourth Ave.
Opposite Court House
Phone 2-2549

I r
I t
r , '.

I

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CAPITOL MARKET III

T.

M

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IBS

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20%/"off I,
ALL Shoes in SNE

From $3.50 to $8.95
LINGERIE -
the perfect gift!
M
Nylon half slips. ... from 3.95
Nylon slips. . . .... from 5.95
Nylon gowns. ..... from 8.95
Cotton half slips.., from 1.95
Cotton slips.......from 1.95
Cotton comisoles. . .from 1.95
slip sizes 32-38
half slip sizes S-M-L
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this stupendous special

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