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May 06, 1951 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-05-06

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SUNDAY, MAY 9, 1951

T'T E M TC TIT( A N fA IL Y s...4 j a~ a 4 .4 4 M4 4 4

1 1111 IVA A X-,i 1A 1 V rn L I 1 ' X11 E.1 1

(

i ]Debate
11 Begin
G Week
atroversial debate at 8 p.-
sday at the Rackham Am-
,tre on the bias=clause issue
ve as a "kickoff rally" for
.ity Week.
e panel discussion on fra-
discrimination, viewpoints
egments of campus opinion
represented.
* * *
Interfraternity Council
of "educated tolerance"
defended by Pete John-
52, head of the IFC Hu-
elations Committee, which
n working on the problem
years. A survey of discrim-
attitudes among fraternity
as undertaken last year in
ction with the Survey Re-
Center.
laining the Student Leg-
stand will be former leg-
Bill McIntyre; '52, ex-
of the SL Campus Action

BLAMES MOVIES:
Foreigners Misunderstand
U.S. Students, Says Visitor

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By PAULA EDELMAN
American movies, and magazines
present a completely distorted pic-
ture of college life to foreigners,
Myra Roper, president of Women's
College of Melborne, Australia, who
is visiting the University this week-
end, said yesterday.
"The general stereotype of the
American student is a burly ,foot-
ball player who does nothing but
* * *

; fall SL passed a recom-
%tion that fraternities which
} delete their discriminatory
s by September, 1956, be
1 University recognition, ex-
under certain extenuating
istances. This motion is
ng final approval of Presi-
Alexander Ruthven.
PRESSING THE more ex-
independent opinion will be
I o n MacDougall, former
Progressive chief.
C presidents from three
e r campuses, Minnesota,
hwestern a n d Michigan
, will describe the prob-
is it exists at their colleges.
el moderator will be Prof.
bitzenberg of the English de-
ent, former residence hall
or and long interested in
it affairs.
E IFC-sponsored Fraternity
will then roll into high gear
esday with an afternoon
discussion on IFC problems
policies and the IFC Sing
at night.
house president's dinner
day and the IFC Ball with
James Saturday round out
cond annual "Greek week."
n for the interlude of affili-
estivity is "The Best in Cam-
Ife."
y Run Extended
Arts Theatre Club will pre-
an extra performance of
Bridie's "Mr. Bolfrey" at
tomorrow 209%1/ E. Washing-

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
MYRA ROPER
fall in and out of love. But in reali-
ty I have found a serious student
body in American colleges with
a tremendous amount of intellec-
tual curiosity," Miss Roper said in
her slightly-clipped English accent.
"In fact I particularly wish to
Singers Will
Give Concert
The Michigan Singers, directed
by Prof. Maynard Klein, will pre-
sent their annual spring concert at
8:30 p.m. Thursday in Rackham
Recital Hall.
The Singers are an extra-cur-
ricular group of 50 music students
chosen from the University choir
and they take pride in performing
the best choral literature avail-
able.
Highlights of the coming con-
cert will be Brahm's "Zigennerlie-
der," a collection of Gypsy songs,
and Delrus's "Songs of Farewell,"
which takes its text from Walt
Whitman's "Leaves of Grass."
A comparatively new group on
campus, the Singers were started
by Prof. Klein about three years
ago.
The concert will be open to the
public without charge.

commend them on their acute pow-
er of self-criticism," she added.
* * *
THE AUSTRALIAN educator's
visit to the University is part of
her extensive tour of American
colleges and universities, which is
being sponsored by a Carnegie
grant.
"I want to meet as many stu-
dents as possible and observe
the dorms and extra-curricular
activities so I can take back a
true picture of American cam-
puses," she revealed.
* * *
MISS ROPER finds the Univer-
sity very different from Melborne
College.
"Not only are your buildings
the most impressive I've seen,
but the amount of equipment
you have is overwhelming."
Citing as examples Health Ser-
vice and the Student Publications
Building she said, "We have noth-
ing to compare with either of
them."
* * *
"BUT THEN your superior fa-
cilities fit in with your whole em-
phasis on extra-curricular activi-
ties which is an important differ-
ence between your school and
ours," she added. Miss Roper ex-
plained that in the English sys-
tem there is much less time devoted
to outside activities and more con-
centration on actual academic
work.
"Although this interest on the
part of American students has
created a lively, vibrant atmos-
phere on your campuses, the
danger is that the student
doesn't have enough time for
quiet study," she pointed out.
She noted another difference be-
tween American and English
schools in their curricula. "You
study a great variety of subjects in
a short period of time, whereas we
offer the student a more concen-
trated area of study in a longer
length of time, particularly in the
basic courses."
* * *
"THE AMERICAN student gets
a wide and shallow education, with
a tendency towards fragmenta-
tion, as compared to the English
student who receives a narrow,
but deeper one," she commented.
Having already visited several
Easten schools, Miss Roper now
plans to travel to Western col-
leges and universities to com-
plete her three month tour.
."My greatest hope," she de-
clared, "is that there can be a
more extensive exchange of Eng-
lish and American students and
teachers so that we might dispel
the misconceptions we have of one
another."

STUDENT TEACHER DEMONSTRATES HOPSCOTCH

Following the well-known phil-
osophy of gaining skill through
experience, student teaching in lo-
cal schools and the University
Elementary and High schools is de-
signed to give education students
a background that will help them
later in their own classes.
Approximately 200 students
spend at least 12 hours in the
elementary school, and from five
to 15 hours in the secondary
schools each week in this capacity.
Although not required for a de-
gree, student teaching is required
for a teaching certificate.
* * *
STUDENTS may "practice
teach" only in their senior year,
and they find that this provides
an excellent opportunity to put
classroom principles to practical
use.
About the biggest problem, ac-
cording to one student teacher, is
getting the complete attention
and respect of the students,
especially at the first meeting
of the semester. "Students first
see how much they can get away
with and then act accordingly,"
he explained.
In order to compare the many
individual problems that may arise,
weekly seminars and conferences
are held in which students discuss
and plan future classroom pgo-
grams. * * *
ALTHOUGH under a supervisor,
student teachers often have the op-
portunity to take over the class
by themselves. During the semester
they are often called upon to ar-
range and direct a unit of class
work, which may last a week or
more.
In line with the principle of
givng the student teachers as
relitic an experience as pos-
sible students are also encour-
aged to attend Parent-Teacher
Association meetings, and to
participate in the extra-curricu-
lar activities of the school.
Each student teacher remains
with a particular class throughout
the semester. In the elementary
school every subject from arts and
crafts to mathematics is taught,
but in high school, student teach-
ers usually concentrate on their
major subject, which may range
from history to physical education.
Their own grade is based upon
command of the subject matter,
relations with their students, and
general competency in teaching. A
grade of at least "C" is required to
secure a teaching certificate.
* * *
IN THE elementary school stu-
dent teaching is relatively new.
Before its introduction in 1945.
prospective teachers had to go tc
neighboring communities for their
practice teaching training.
Under an arrangement with
the Ann Arbor public schools
student teaching is carried on in

-- °-°

other schools throughout the
city. This system has allowed it
to grow from a very small num-
ber to the present capacity, al-
though even now not all applica-
tions can be filled.
The University schools them-
selves are well equipped with facili-
ties similar to what a teacher will
find in any high school or elemen-
tary school they may later work in.
Playrooms, lunchrooms, gymna-
siums and an auditorium are found
in the elementary school. In addi-
tion to these features, the high
school, comprising children from
the seventh to the twelfth grades,
has complete home economics and
industrial arts laboratories.
* * *
"WITHOUT facilities such as we
offer it would be impossible to give
iT

student teachers an adequate pic-
ture of what teaching is really
like," Prof. Robert Dixon of the
education school commented.
"Student teachers, themselves,
see the value of this course. Most
of them agree that it is well worth
the time put into it."
This general feeling was ex-
pressed by one student teacher
who said, "When we have our
own jobs we will be well pre-
pared. This will be a great help
when facing a classroom com-
pletely on our own."
Even the high school and ele-
mentary' students themselves
seemed pleased with this arrange-
ment. One high school student re-
marked that not only was her stu-
dent teacher capable of teaching
the course, but he was "handsome
as well."
Other high school students
thought they benefited more from
many courses by having two teach-
ers in the room.
"One of the ultimate objectives
of student teaching," Prof. Dixon
explained, "is to instill in future
teachers a feeling of the responsi-
bilities of their future work. We
feel that the training received here
will in a great measure prepare
them to competently take over the
classroom, and we attempt to teach
them to forget themselves and
concentrate on their students."

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NURSERY SCHOOL CHILDREN LISTEN TO A STORY

A MINIATURE HOUSE IS BUILT IN FINE ARTS CLASS

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A DAILY PHOTO
Story by CARA CHE7i1 N'IAK

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Exquisite

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Photographs

by Daily

Photographers

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Gowns to'. IFC Ball

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STUDENT TEACHER LEADS A HIGH SCHOOL MENTAL HYGIENE SEMINAR

SOLDERING IS DEMONSTRATED TO SEVENTH GRAERS

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j. I. COUSINS
STATE STREET

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