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April 22, 1951 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 22,-1951

__.y ___ ._ _ _ _. v __.Y_
s __ _______- __

BOARD CREATED:

allery To Head Institute

Board of Regents yester-
,ablished a Board of Gover-
mnd appointed a director
new Institute of Industrial
Institute was created Dec.
conjunction with a $1,500,-
)nation made by General
Corporation to the Phoe-
oject.
rod Mallery, Jr., a professor
e cts 10
Given at

in the Medical School and chief
of the clinical laboratories in Uni-
versity Hospital, was appointed di-
rector. He joined the hospital staff
in 1941 as a resident physician.
Dr. Mallery was named an in-
structor in the Medical School in
1942 and became a professor in
1946.
THE SIX-MAN Board of Gov-
ernors will serve as a policy-
making body responsible for the
direction and supervision of the
Institute's activities. President
Alexander G. Ruthven was ap-
pointed chairman of the board.
The Institute is designed to
study many fields of education-
al and research activities in-
cluding the prevention.diagno-
Bayly TOGive
Speech Series
On Christianity

ndelssohn
speech department will pre-
.e fourth and last bill of one
r the season Thursday and
in the Lydia Mendelssohn
e.
playwrights, ranging from
n Shakespeare to University
,te student Mrs. Jacqueline

n, a
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sed
n f
n's p
s cal
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be L
and
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he bi
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will be represented on Joseph T. Bayly, eastern region-
f four works. Shake- al secretary of the Inter-Varsity
story "Henry V" will be Fellowship series will deliver a ser-
to five scenes taking 45 ies of four speeches on Christian-
or the program. Mrs. ity this week as speaker for the
play, an allegorical fan-. University Christian Mission.
lled "Century." Bayly will speak at 7:30 p.m.
t acts of Noel Coward's tomorrow through Thursday in
ives" and Edward Per- Kellogg Auditorium on the rele-
Reginald Denham's vancy of the Christian doctrines
Retirement" will com- to everyday life.
ill. The topic for the talk tomorrow
y" is concerned with the will be, "Can God Be Discovered?"
s of a forest who evolve On spcceeding days he will dis-
ng period of time into cuss "Insecurity-The Student's
histicates of modern so- Dilemma," "Are Jesus' Teachings
Relevant?" and "Finding Faith."
s play is a sophisticated Sponsored by the Michigan
ncerned with two sets of Christian Fellowship, the Mission
and their somewhat speeches will be supplemented by
honeymoons on the group discussions which are sche-
viera. duled to take place in dormitories
in an actual ,Victorian and houses throughout the cam-
Ladies in Retirement" pus. Leading the discussions will
n air of mystery to the be six assistants of Bayly and two
members of the University faculty,
for the bill will go on Prof. Gowon Van Wylan of the
a.m. Wednesday in the engineering college and Prof. Ken-
ix office. They will cost j neth Pike of the linguistics de-
partment.
I

Sis and treatment of occupa-
tional diseases.
GM President Charles E. Wilson
had described the aims of the
Institute as implementing, per-
petuating and expanding the cor-
poration's present employe health
maintainance and research pro-
grams,
THE REGENTS also accepted
gifts totaling $67,515. The largest
was a $25,000 grant from L. J.
Montgomery of Battle Creek for
the Bronchial Asthma Research
Fund.
During the same meeting the
Regents approved the appoint-
ment of five professors to the
faculty. Prof. Abraham Kaplan
was named as a visiting pro-
fessor in the philosophy depart-
ment for the academic year
1951-52.
Prof. Robert A. McCleary has
been appointed to the psychology
department. At present an in-
structor at Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity, he will teach an under-
graduate course in physiological
psychology in addition to labora-
tory, seminar and research duties.
Named to the zoology deart-
ment as a genetics teacher, Prof.
David L. Nanney will instruct in
graduate and undergraduate
courses.
The remaining two new ap-
pointments were Prof. Patricia W.
Rabinovitz in the new School of
Social Work and Prof. Andre S.
Dreiding in the chemistry depart-
ment.
*. * *
LEAVES OF ABSENCE were
granted to Dr. Maurice H. Seever,
chairman of the pharmacology
department, and Prof. Malcolm H.
Soule, chairman of the bacterio-
logy department. They will ac-
company a 12-man medical edu-
cation mission to Japan.
Three emeritus titles were con-
ferred by the Regents. They were
given to Wilfred B. Shaw, direc-
tor emeritus o alumni relations;
John F. Shepard, professor emer-
itus of psychology; and John G.
Winter, professor eieritus of La-
tin languages and literature.
New Booklets
To Be Issued
For the first time in the his-
tory of the graduate school, spe-
cial commencement announce'
ments will be available to candi-
dates for an advanced degree.
Booklets, listing members of the
Executive Board, administrative
officers and candidates for de-
grees, will also be printed. Leather
bound volumes will be about 75
cents each, while those bound in
cardboard will cost approximately
50 cents.
Fold announcements at 15 cents
each will also be available. Per-
sonal cards to send with these an-
nouncements may be ordered in
lots of 100 at $.00 per lot.
Those students who wish to
take advantage of this new fea-
ture may sign the list in the Ad-
ministrative Offices in Rackham
before April 23. Unless enough
students show interest, the project
will be dropped.

Psych Class
To Surveyt
U' Attitude
Student attitudes toward the
University will be examined in a
two week survey conducted by the;
students of the psychology 185t
class, Prof. Angus Campbell of the
psychology department announced
yesterday.a
The survey, which is being car-
ried outeincooperation with the
Survey Research Center, is de-7
signed to query approximately 400
students on what they expect to,
get from their college education.
The names of the 400 students
taking part in the survey were tak-
en at random from the complete
list of enrolled students. Postcards
will be sent to the selected students
requesting them to come to an in-
terview where the survey questions
will be asked.
Although Administration offi-
cials have expressed interest ih the
findings of the group, Prof. Camp-
bell emphasized that the basic pur-
pose of the survey is to give the
students of psychology 185 ex-
perience in poll-taking methods.
Pollock Gets Post
Prof. James K. Pollock, chair-
man of the political science de-
partment, has been awarded the
*presidency of the Foundation for
a Unified, Democratic Germany in
a United Europe, it was announced
yesterday.

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Deportation, Flag Tricks
Top Campus Problems

OLD IRONCLADS-The USS Monitor, known to many as 'a
cheese box on a raft,' is shown locked in mortal combat with the
Confederate ship, the Merrimac, on March 9, 1862 off Hampton
Roads, Virginia.
* *
'Save the Monitor' Says
'U' Midshipman's Club

By WENDY OWEN
.Deportation charges filed
against two students and some flag
shenanigans topped the college
news this week.
The Daily Texan reported that
immigration officials arrested a
junior engineering student from
Iraq and one Israeli student on
"undesirable alien" charges. An at-
torneyfrom the AmericangCivil
Liberties Union is defending the
Iraqi and will apply for a writ of
habeas corpus. The other student
will be assisted by relatives in
Galveston.
According to one University of
Texas official "all this publicity
probably ruined their chances of
finishing this semester." Previous-
ly, "a lot of groundwork had been
laid toward 'getting a stay of sen-
tence until after this semester."
THE FLAGPOLE, in the news
Fowler To Speak,
On Law Problems
Cody Fowler, president of the
American Bar Association, will
speak on the topic, "The Practical,
Problems of' Young Lawyers" at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 100 of
.Hutchins Hall.
The Student Bar Association is
sponsoring Fowler's appearance
and the speech is open to the pub-
lic.

at the University of Washington,
was a decorative spire atop one
of the administrative buildings.
Though almost completely weath-
eged away, students found it useful
for displaying first, a red Cossack
jacket and then a dirty white table
cloth.
Both "flags" required roofing
crews to remove them. After the
second display, the Daily Wash-
ington reported that the spire
was to be removed, so it could
no longer be used by student
pranksters.
At the University of Illinois, a
home-made Communist flag, com-
plete with yellow hammer-and-
sickle alarmed townspeople when
it was prominently displayed be-
fore a local fraternity house. The
folks complained to the police who
forced its removal.
LOW COST SEMINARS
1For students during July and August
under the auspices of the Inter-
University Jewish Federation of Greatr
'Britain and Ireland, and the French
Union of Jewish students.
for Information, Writer
newish Educational Travel Organization
SO West-45th Street, New York 19, N.T.

By RON WATTS
A cry "Save the Monitor," now
sweeping the nation, was picked up
in Ann Arbor yesterday with a
vigor that may be heard to the
depths of Davy Jones' locker.
The slogan which began in the
offices of the Harvard Crimson at
Cambridge, Mass. and was picked
up by the University Midshipmen's
Club called for the salvage of the
historical ironclad USS Monitor.
They want to make a national
monument of the ship.
* * *
"AS MIDSHIPMEN in the
United States Navy, we are proud
to join the committee of 'American
Patriots for Raising the Monitor',"
Fred Fischbach, '52, president of
the Midshipmen's Club asserted.
The Monitor was a Yankee
ironclad ship which gained fame
in a battle with the Confederate
ship Merrimac on March 9, 1862
in Hampton Roads, Virginia.
The encounter was outstanding as
the first battle between ironclad
warships in the history of the
world.
"When we learned that a Navy
anti-submarine patrol had discov-
ered the Monitor off Cape Hatteras
where she floundered in a gale
December 31, 1862, our breasts
swelled with patriotic fervor," the
founding group at Harvard
claimed.
* * *
MEANWHILE, the midshipmen
were feverishly debating what

should be the final resting place
of the Monitor when it has been
restored. One sailor speculated that
with all the fire President Truman
has been under lately, the Monitor
might be turned over to him to re-
place the present presidential
yacht, USS Williamsburg.
However, there was opposition
among some students toward the
Midshipmen's Club supporting
such a move. "If the Student Af-
fairs Committee recognizes an or-
ganization pledged to salvage that
ship, I'll secede from the Univer-
sity," Ken Swords, '51, from Miami,
Fla., asserted.
Kelly To Speak
At Dedication
Harry F. Kelly, former governor
of Michigan, will deliver the main
address today at the dedication
cerembnies of the new Catholi
Youth Center.
University Regent, Roscoe 0
Bonisteel, will also take part ir
the program which is schedule
to begin at 3 p.m. at the Center
538 N. Division.
The Center, formerly known a.
the Cornwall Home, was purchas-
ed by St. Thomas Church las
April. Since August more than 20(
persons have contributed theit la-
bors to make the house suitable
for recreational uses.

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For those Summer days
just around the corner .f..

BOOK

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AMPHIBIOUS AUTO:
Watery Smashup Creates
UniqueLegal Complications

A.
;.

Qt

F LLETTs
State Street at North University

- ---- M- OMM"

""

By JOHN BRILEY
Whether an auto driver who
pulls out of an intersection with-
out even tooting his fog horn and
smacks into a passing boat should
be sued or " sunk is the problem
facing police captain Jack Flyfield
of McGregor, Ia.
The problem came up when a car
being driven through the water
collided with the boat Flyfield was
navigating down a flooded street
in Prairie Du Chien, Wis.
* *
AL BLUMROSEN '53L, pointed
out that a jury would have to de-

9 Nickels Arcade
217 S. Main St.

1

cide if the auto driver was under
any duty to exercise- due care and
whether he breached that duty by
not acting as a reasonable man
would towards a motor boat cruis-
ing down the street.
"And in deciding if the cap-
tain had contributed to the ac-
cident by negligence on his part,
the jury would have to decide if
he drove his motor boat as a rea-
sonably prudent man would drive
a motor boat down a city street,"
Tom Walsh, '51L, added.
The auto driver's biggest mis-
take, Blumrosen contended, was
not hiting a boat, but hitting a boat
driven by a police captain.
The Wisconsin auto driver must
have thought the same thing for
he rolled his window down after
the collision and apologised, ex-
plaining he had no brakes because
of the high water.
Police Captain Flyfield, perhaps
thinking of the legal maze he
might precipitate by hasty action,
replied amiably, "That's all right,
I don't have any brakes either."

J. C. COUSINS
STATE STREET

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