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April 06, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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RIDAY, APRIL 9, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UUDENTS RIVAL REMBRANDT:
DirtyWindows Lure Amateur Artists
By DAVIS CRIPPEN
budgetary problem of the Uni-
ity has given artistically sup
sed business administration
[ents an unexpected chance to
ress themselves.f
enerally regarded by the rest
he campus as interested only
earning how to make the most
Zey in the least amount of
e, a large number of the bus-}
s students have taken to draw-
pictures in the dust on the r .
dows of their school's building.«
* * *
HE DIRTY WINDOWS are the
zlt of a tight University budget,
>rding to an official in the
nt Department. Until last De-'
.ber, he explained, there was a
cial crew of men which washed ;r
the windows in University

SL Business
Board Joins
U.S. Bureau
The Student Legislature's Bet-
ter Business Board has become
affiliated with the National Bet-
ter Business Bureau on a trial
basis.
The Board, whose main pur-
pose has been to help guard stu-
dents against phony solicitors, will
now receive information from the
national firm telling of frauds and
misdealings going on in this area.
Also available to the Board,
which changed its name from the
Better Business Bureau to avoid
confusion with the national asso-
ciation, will be a central registry
of bonded publishing companies.
"Under the new setup we should
be able to cut down quite appreci-
ably the number of frauds on stu-
dents by magazine and encyclo-
pedia solicitors," Jim Nesbitt,
'51BAd, chairman of the Board
explained.
Approved solicitors will now be
able to identify themselves by let-
ters of introduction from the
Board. Formerly, registration
cards were granted to solicitors
merely upon application to SL.

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At that time, in any economy
move, the men on this crew had
to be assigned to other jobs.
Since December dirt has collect-
ed on windows all over the cam-
pus, but a quick survey revealed
that the new school of Dirty
Window art has reached its
highest point of development in
he Monroe St. skyscraper.
Written on a number of, the
indows were "I am dirty. Wash
le." One Rembrandt sketched a
ower pot, complete with flowers
L it. Another student took the
pportunity to even a score, by
cpressing his opinion about a
articular professor.
NONE OF THE student artists
Auld be found to comment, but
ie opinion, of the other students
2 the school seems to be split as
the value of the window scrib-
ings.
"It isn't in keeping with the
ay a college student should con-
uct himself," Reinhold Batzer,
iBAd, said. "It's below even
hat a normal person would do.
[ust be some. kind of repression
oming out."
But Bob Sanregret, '52, said,
Iorowitz Concert
Set for April 18
Vladinir -Horowitz, world fam-
us pianist, will appear in the last
>ncert of the Choral Union Series
t 8:30 p.m. April 18 in Hill Audi-
)rium.
The concert, originally' sched-
led for Jan. 19, was postponed
ecause of the artist's illness.
Information*concerning the re-
ised concert program may be ob-
ained at the offices of the Uni-
ersity Musical Society in Burton
ower.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

FROM ACCOUNTING TO ART-An appropriately garbed busi-
ness administration student takes time out from classes to sketch
a quick design on one of the windows in the Monroe St. classroom
building.

* * *

4

R A R E B I R D S -- Les'Mobley, superintendent of the Cata-
lina Bird Park at Avalon, Cal., looks over three emu chicks be-
lieved to be among the first to be, hatched and live in captivity.

CHECKING THE LIKEN ESS.-Ch. Ensarr Lace,
a standard poodle owned by Mrs. W. French Githens, of Bernards-
ville, N. J., admires his mirrored reflection beforeaNew York show:

"I would have done some writing
myself except that the windows
were all scribbled up."
Whatever the ideas of the stu-
dents on the subject, the dirt seems
to be on the windows of the Uni-
versity to stay-at least until after
July 1, when the new fiscal year
starts.
Custodians in the campus build-
ings have been able to wash some
windows, after finishing their re-
'gular chores, the Plant Depart-
ment official said, but they don't
have time to wash them all.
"If they give us enough money
next year, we'll wash the windows.
Otherwise they'll just have to stay
dirty."

Arts Theatre Club To Present
Performances During Vacation

I

The Arts Theatre Club will
maintain its regular schedule of
performances throughout the Uni-
versity's spring vacation, club Bus-
iness Manager Ed Troupin an-
nounced yesterday..'
Henrik Ibsen's "The Master
Builder" will play through Sunday.
Then, Friday, after the group's
regular four day lay-off between
productions, "The Recruiting Of-
ficer," by George Farquhar will be
presented.

Clouds Won't Stop Star Study

Clear or cloudy weather, the
astronomy department plans to
hold its series of four visitors'
nights on schedule this spring.
Devoting each night to the
study of a portion of the solar sys-
tem, the evening's activities will
start at 8 p.m. with a half hour
illustrated lecture. Following this
SL Candidate,
Candidates for the Student Leg-
islature will be required to attend
all SL meetings, assigned com-
mittee meetings and. candidates
training meetings, according to
Spidre Webb, '52, chairman of
the Citizenship Committee.
Failure to attend any combin-
ation of two meetings will mean
disqualification as a candidate.

will be actual observation of the
planets or stars discussed, using
telescopes or binoculars. All this
will occur, that is, if there/ is a
clear day.
If the sky is cloudy, making ob-
servation impossible, then a tour
will be conducted through the
planetarium, following the sched-
uled lecture. During this tour, the
various telescopes and equipment
in the planetarium will be demon-
strated and explained&
The dates of the visitors nights
and the topics to be studied are
as follows: On Fri., April 20, May
11 and May 18, 'The Moon and
Saturn', and on Fri., April 27,
'Saturn and a Star Cluster.'
The lectures will take place in
Rm. 3017, A.H., and the observa-
tions will, be conducted on the
fifth floor in the student observa-
tory. The evenings activities will
last until about 10 p.m.

THE FARQUHAR play, fourth
to be presented by the group in
its first season of plays, is one of
the last of the Restoration come-
dies.
The plot of "The Recruiting
Officer" is concerned basically
with the efforts of two army
men, Captain Plume and Ser-
geant Kite, to recruit men for
the Queen's service. Since the
two will do anything to get men,
complications quickly ensue,
upon their arrival in Shrews-
bury, the English town in which
the play is set.
Main among the many subplots
of the play are two love affairs,
one between Captain Plume and
Sylvia, a young native of the
town; the other involving two
young people of the town, Worthy
and Melinda.
The production is being directed
by Warren Pickett. The two sets
of lovers will be played by Dana
Elcar and Sonya Raimi as Cap-
tain Plume and Sylvia, and Jerry
Lepard and Joyce Edgar as Wor-
thy and Melinda. Kite will be
played by Strowan Robertson.
To Honor Initiates
New Phi Beta Kappa initiates
will be honored Friday, April 20
at 6:30 p.m. with a dinner at the
Union. Prof. William R. Parker
of the English department at the
University of New York, and sec-
retary of the Modern Language
Institute will speake on "A Man
to Remember."

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B ARR E L O F LI G H T - Exhaustflames of r m-let
engines in tips of the "Hiller Hornet" helicopter's rotor blade trace
light pattern during night demonstration at Palo Alto, Cal. One
flash bulb was fiared while the 'copter was in the air.

P R I Z E W I N N E R -- Phi Mu Delta fraternity men com-
plete an ice sculpture of a rocket poised atop a snow globe in the
University of New Hampshire's 30th Winter Carnival at Durham.

C(0LUMBI7A
IRECORDS
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ARTISTS!
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New English Lyrics by
Howard Dietz: New
Libretto by Garson Kanis
Pons Weitch Tueke
Kullman Lipton Brownlee
Eugene Ormandy
conducting the
Chorus and Orchestra of
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA ASSOCIATION
Coumbia 333/3 rpm
Set $1,108 or 78 rpm Set Ii(P32
Hear these great
Metropoltan OperaProductions
*Compte on Columbia Records
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great show music
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Vivienne SEGAL and Harold LANG
in the great RODGERS & HART Hiti
Hear these delightful songs:
You Mustn't Kick It Around: I Could
{ Write a Book; Bewitched; Zip; In our
Little Den of Iniquity and others.
MARZ
'ANYTHNG
Ti// SANDWGOES
r ie' ThesS and other Broadway Hits
Only on Columbia Records
> SOUT1 PACIFIC3;
' GENTLEMEN,~
PREFER BLONDES
KISS ME, KATE
PETER PAN -

One whisker
doesb make
dota bluebeard

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X. TRAVEL AI DE-
i Novel "trolley" in London's
s Olympia ideal home exhibition
S T A T E H 0 0 D P ;R I Z E- Rep. H. A. Patten (center) of Arizona 'shows 49-star U. S. flag is boon to travelers with heavy
made by a Navajo Indian 75 years ago to Joseph Farrington (left), Hawaiian delegate, and Alaska cases. It can be adjusted to
delegate E~. L. B~artlett, He promised flag to delegate whose territory first becomes a state. height best suited to user.

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RHAyep o wd4.

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-but Cigars are

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