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April 06, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ontrealBlasts Red Wings, -2, Leads Cu

Series

Two 'M' Squads Embark
Por Annual Dixie Invasion

4>

Golf
The University of Michigan golf
team will open the 1951 season
against three of the Country's top
college squads on its annual in-
vasion of the South.
Wake Forest, led by Arnold Pal-
mer, Pennsylvania amateur king,
will test the Wolverines on April
9th. The 10th and 11th are slated
for pratcice sessions over Pine-
hurst's famed layout. Concluding
the trip will be matches with Duke
and North Carolina at Durham's
Hope Valley Country Club.
LAST YEAR- THE southern
schools were "rude" hosts. Duke
and North Carolina scored victor-
CorrectionI
Fletcher Hall and not Pres-
cott House placed second in
the I-M Residence Hall track
meet Wednesday night.

Tennis
Coach Bill Murphy and six
members of the Wolverine tennis
squad are scheduled to leave to-
day for the sunny South and a
solid week of practice during
Spring vacation.
Those making the trip are Al
Hetzeck, Steve Bromberg, Gene
Barrack, Mike Schwartz, Jack
Smart and Bob Curhan.
THE TEAM'S ITINERARY calls
for several days practice in Flor-
ida during the early part of the
week and then a swing up to Dur-
ham, North Carolina for a series
of warm-up matches with the
Duke Blue Devils.
This will be Murphy's first
chance to scrutinize his charges
in outdoor action this year. Due
to cold and rainy weather the
Michigan racquet wielders have
been forced to hold their prac-
tice sessions on the Sport Build-
ing's indoor courts.
Although only six men were
named to the traveling squad,
Murphy indicated that another
man may be named to the team
later for the coming Big Ten cam-
paign.

Grid Squad
Ends Drills
For Recess
Pre-spring vacation drills endec
for 75 aspiring Michigan gridders
yesterday afternoon under a warm
April sun at Ferry Field.
This last workout, featured a
long scrimmage session. Practice
will get underway again Monday,
April 16, with a scrimmage com-
ing up at the Michigan Stadium
later in the spring.
FACED WITH his biggest re-
building job in his four years at
the Michigan helm, Coach Bennie
Oosterbaan put his lads though
a stiff practice session.
Working out were three back-
field lettermen, who are counted
upon for a great deal of work
next fall. The trio includes Ted
Topor, who may wind up at a
fullback post, the squat Wes
Bradford and Larry Oldham.
Topor looked in exceptional
form as he broke away for sev-
eral long runs. When he took the
ball and started to ramble, he was
extremely difficult to stop. Brad-
ford and Oldham also showed to
advantage in the early drill.
Among the newcomers D i c k
Balzhiser, Ted Kress and Don
Zanfanga all performed in excel-
lent fashion.

3
1
a
1
t
i
I

IT'S 'PLAY BALL' TODAY FOR THE WOLVERINES.
** * *
Wolverine Nine To Open
withGeorgetown Tod.ay11

___

BASEBALL:
Bums Nip
Phils, 5-4
In Tenth
JACKSONVILLE-()-Brook-
lyn and the Philadelphia Phils
played extra innings for the third
straight game yesterday before'
another overflow crowd of 7,973,
an all-time record for this city.
Rookie Rocky Bridges, making
his debut at third base, won the
game for the Brooks, 5-4, with a
single scoring Peewee Reese in the
10th inning.
TRIBE 6, GIANTS 5
HOUSTON-The Cleveland In-
dians spotted the New York Giants
five runs in the first inning, then
came from behind to beat them,
6 to 5, on shortstop Ray Boone's
single with one out in the ninth
before a crowd of 9,130.
* * *
CUBS 2, PIRATES 1
NEW ORLEANS-Fire destroyed
part of the stands at Pelican Stadi-
um here yesterday and the Chi-
cago Cubs-Pittsburgh Pirates ex-
hibition game was called at the
end of the sixth inning.
The Cubs were leading 2-1 when
the game was called.
* * *
REDS 9, SENATORS 5
GAINESVILLE-Outfielders Joe
Adcock and Lloyd Merriman led
the Cincinnati Reds to another
victory over the Washington Sen-
ators, 9 to 5.
Adcock hit a homer with one
runner on base. Merriman, with
three singles, drove in three runs.
* * *
OTHER SCORES
Boston (A) 15, Savannah 0.
St. Louis (A) 14, Ft. Sam Hous-
ton 9.

DETROIT-(M)-The underdog
Montreal Canadiens literally got
up from the floor last night to
topple the favored Detroit Red
Wings, 5 to 2, and move within
one game of the Stanley Cup
hockey finals. Montreal scored all
its goals after Detroit, defending
Stanley Cup Champions, had tak-
en a 2-0 lead and now lead in the
best of seven semi-final series,
three games to two.
A sellout crowd of 14,221 saw
Detroit score its two goals in the
opening period but the Canadiens,
who had finished in third place
in the National Hockey League
race, jumped right back in the
second period to pass the Detroit-
ers. The third period was all Mon-
treal's too.
LITTLE BERNIE (Boom-Boom)
Geoffrion put the second period
spark into the Canadiens. It was
his goal at 17:51 that pushed the
Canadiens ahead 3-2 and left De-
troit a dazed, unaggressive club.
Maurice (The Rocket) Rich-
ard, Billy Reay, Bert Olmstead
and Calum MacKay scored the

Detroit Blows 2 Goal Lead;
Geoffrion Sparks Canadiens

By TED PAPES

ies while heavily favored Wake
Forest gained a tie.
Hampered by poor weather
conditions, which have confined
the men to limited indoor prac-
tice, the Wolverines will be at a
distinct disadvantage when they
tee off against the southern
powers next week.
However, the outlook for the
Big Ten race is extremely bright.
Purdue, last year's champion, was
definitely weakened by the loss
of the great Fred Wampler via
graduation. Ohio State also lost
heavily through graduation. Mich-
Ian, on the other hand, suffered
no serious losses, retaining four
starters and gaining valuable re-
serve strength from the freshman
squad.
* * *j
AROUND THIS SOLID nucleus
of returning lettermen coach Kat-,
zenmeyer will build this year's Big
Ten title contenders.
Back from the team that fin-
ished third behind Purdue and
Ohio State in the Conference
are Bob Olson, John Fraser,
Dean Lind, and Dick Evans.
Supplementing these veterans
will be sophomores H u g h
Wright, Jack Stumpfig, and Lo-
well LeClair and juniors Jim
Dixon and Warren Gast.
Lind from Rockford, Illinois,
former USGA Junior Amateur
Champion, and Evans of Cleve.
land, former Ohio Amateur Cham-
pion, are fine examples of the tal-
ented members of this year's team.

AP Names 'Germany' Schulz
As Center on All-Time Team
By The Associated Press
A second Michigan football alumnus has been named to the
AP's all-time, All-American gridiron team.
Picked for the center position was 67-year old Adolph (Germany)
Schulz who handled pivot duties in the stalwart Michigan line from
1905-08. He joins Bennie Oosterbaan who was selected as an end
on the honor squad earlier.
* * * *
SCHULZ, WHO CAME out of a Fort Wayne, Ind., steel mill in
1904 to enter the University, now is thinking of retiring entirely from
his insurance business to take life easy.
Noted as the "Iron Man" of football's rough and tumble
days, he was halted by his first illness about a month ago. He is
convalescing at his home in Detroit from a major operation made
necessary by a stomach ailment.
Upon hearing of his nomination, the aging Wolverine All-Amer-
ican's only comment was, "That's mighty nice."
SCHULZ WAS NAMED along with two guards, W. W., (Pudge)
Heffelfinger of Yale and Robert Lee Suffridge of Tennessee.
Heffelfinger was a three-year All-American some 60 years ago
and Suffridge was the key man in a great line which carried the
Vols through the 1938-40 period undefeated and untied in regular
season play.

Coach Ray Fisher sends his un-
seasoned Michigan baseball troops
into their first action this after-
noon in a game with Georgetown
University at Washington, D.C.
The contest is number one in a
series of eight scheduled for the
spring vacation. Eighteen Wolver-
ines are making the tour by auto-
mobile.
* ~* *
IF WEATHER permits they will
play single games every day ex-
cept Sundays until school reopens
on April 16.
Unfriendly Ann Arbor skies
and temperatures have seriously
handicapped the team in its
spring preparations. No intra-
squad game was staged and out-
door drills were extremely limit-
ed and almost of negligible bene-
fit.
As a result the starting lineup
for Michigan will come about
largely by the coach's guesswork.
Fisher intends to send his prom-
ising rookie right-hander, Duane
Hegedorn, to the mound in today's
curtain raiser.
The Michigan battery will be
completed by catcher Pete Palmer.
Lefty John Shuett will be close at
hand if Hegedorn gets into trouble
on the hill.
VETERAN THIRD baseman Ger-
ry Dorr tops the infield unit with
Al Weygandt scheduled to start
at first. The keystone combina-
tion is made up of sophomores
Bruce Haynam at short and Gil
Sabuco at second.
Weygandt, a senior, is a hard-
hitting left hand batter who does
well against right handed pit-
chers but not so well when a
southpaw is serving them up.
Consequently Fisher plans to use
Earl Keim at the initial sack
against portsiders.
I-M
BRIEFS

IN THE OUTFIELD Leo Ko-
ceski will return to his familiar
left field pasture and newcomer
Frank Howell will take a crack at
center. Sophomore Gerry Harring-
ton gets the nod in right field.
It is antickpated that Fisher
will make several alterations in
that lineup before returning to
Ann Arbor for the home opener
on April 17. He has seven
moundsmen with him and he
hopes to try all of them on the
firing line.
Hitting abilities among the 18
players represent further question
marks in the general diamond
picture.
Michigan's eight opponents are
expected to benefit from the ad-
vantages of outdoor practice ses-
sions and will probably hold an
edge for that reason.
Last year the Wolverines won
six of eight contests on their pre-
season trip and then went on to
tie for the Western Conference
championship.
VACATION BASEBALL SCHEDULE
April 6-Georgetown at Washington,
D.C.
April 7-George Washington at Wash-
ington, D.C.
April 9--Navy at Annapolis, Md.
April 10-Maryland at College Park,
Md.
April 11-Bolling Air Base, Washing-
ton, D.C.
Aprilt12-Washington and Lee at Lex-
ington, Va.
April 13--VMI at Lexington, Va.
April 14-Virginia at Charlottesville,
Va.
A
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Jerry Rovner sniffed his way to
the All Campus Tennis Singles
Championship by virtuehof a 6-2,
6-3 win over Dick Smith.
Rovner, while trying to cope
with a slight cold, played a colorful
net game. It was only one of the
many techniques he used 'to suc-
cessfully counter tht excellent
serving of Smith.
SMITH, A FORMER Bakersfield
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Although the scores may in-
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Smith took the lead in the first
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* * *
PADDLEBALL
In the professional fraternity
championship finals yesterday Phi
Epsilon Kappa defeated Nu Sig-
ma Nu, 2-1.
It was the second consecutive
title for the winners.
~~

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