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April 04, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,.

I

WAGE SEX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WE DNESOAY, APRIL 4,1951-

PAGE SIX WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4, 1951

THE 'EYES' HAVE IT:
Artistic Joke Wins Spot
In Inter-Arts Exhibition

By MIKE SCHERER
"You too can be a self made
artist," claims Robert B. McGhee,
51E, a newly initiated participator
in the higher arts.f
McGhee offers this word of ad-
vice to students who don't realize
that they have tremendous artis-
tic " potentiality, having had his
first attempt at modern art hung
at the Inter-Arts Union Student
Art Exhibit in the South Gallery
of Alumni Memorial Hall.
* * *
THE PEN and ink sketch, en-
titled "Eyes on Me," was done ori-
ginallytas a joke, but turned out
so well that it was deemed worthy
of public exhibition.
One day McGhee decided to
mimic the work of his room-
mate, art school student John
)Goodyear, '52, so he sat down
and in 15 minutes had produced
his creation. Goodyear, an ei
tor of "Generation, student arts
magazine, looked at the drawing
and decided immediately that it
had possibilities.
Through Goodyear's encourage-
ment, McGhee submitted his
drawing to the Student Art Ex-
hibit, which began March 18.
Much to his surprise it was hung
alongside works by some of the
outstanding artists on campus.
McGHEE DENIES having any
previous experience in art. He
claims that the inspiration for
"Eyes on Me" was trying to drink
a pitcher of beer in a men's dorm.
The new artist blushed and
said modestly, "I didn't realize
the consequences of what I was
doing."
McGhee added, "If anyone wants
to buy it, I'm willing to sell at
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Incidentally, today is the last
day to see the exhibition in Alumni
Hall.

Swinton To
Lecture on
journalism
Stanley S. Swinton, Associated
Press war correspondent who has
recently returned from Korea, will
address a group of journalism stu-
dents in Rm. 1025 Angell Hall to-
day.
His topic will be "The American
Press and the Korean War" and
will be one of the series of lectures
sponsored by the journalism de-
partment.
* * *
SWINTON'S LAST VISIT here
was made in March, 1949, when he
had just completed 'three and a
half years as chief of the south-
eastern Asia bureau of the AP in
Indonesia. He left Ann Arbor at
that time to assume his duties as
chief of the Middle East bureau at
Cairo and was transferred to the
Korean front eight months ago.
Swinton is now here visiting
his parents, Prof. and Mrs. Roy
Swinton, before undertaking a
new assignment for the AP.
Swinton graduated from the
University in 1940. He was city
editor of The Daily in 1940, then
joined the AP staff in Detroit.
During the war, he was a Stars
and Stripes correspondent, cover-
ing such events as the execution
of Mussolini in Milan.

PRECEDENT SET:
Other Colleges Consider
Michigan Anti-Bias Plan

Delegates to two student con-
ferences last weekend heard the
details of the Michigan anti-bias
clause plan and gave indications
that similar plans may soon be
initiated on many other campus-
es across the nation.
As a direct result of a report
presented at the National Student
Conference on Human Relations
in Higher Education, a resolution
was passed supporting the action
taken by the University Student
Affairs Committee and recom-
mending the passage of similar
plans at other schools.
THE RESOLUTION, like the
Michigan Plan, called forkdenial
of recognition to student organi-
zations that still have bias clauses
in their constitutions by October,
1956.
Herb Ruben, '51, and Wally
Pearson, '53, of the Student,
Legislature's Human Relations
Committee, who presented the
Michigan Plan to the Confer-

ence, reported on it to the SL
Cabinet last night.
The plan was also presented to
delegates of the Big Ten Student
Government Conference at North.
western University.
* * *
EARLHAM COLLEGE in Rich-
mond, Indiana was the scene of
the Human Relations Conference
which was sponsored by the Am-
erican Council on Education.
Besides dealing with student
organizations, the Conference
discussed discrimination prob-
lems in regard to admissions,
living facilities, athletics and
recreation, curricula and teach-
er employment, economic aid
and legislation.
Educational institutions that
consider room assignments or
changes of roommates on the ba-
sis of race, creed, religion or na-
tional origin were condemned by
the Conference.

-M11e Scherer
REST IN PEACE-Two members of Phi Gamma D elta, Bob Evans, '53, and Dick Hodgman, '53, keep
silent vigil over the last earthly remains of their p et and mascot, Tacko. Tacko, a parakeet which
was brought from California by "Butch" McGuir e, last fall, died suddenly last night of unknown
causes. A solemn furwal service was held yesterday, and the bird was laid to rest in a miniature
casket in front of the Alpha Phi sorority house.

Varied Opportunities in Public

Prof. Willard

Health Revealed at Discussion IWill Receive

Campus Calendar

Events Today
FURNITURE EXHIBIT - This
is the last day that the Modern
Furniture Exhibit will be shown.
Sponsored by the architecture col-
lege, the exhibit is open from 1
to 5 and 7 to 10 p.m. in Alumni
Memorial Hall.
SPANISH PLAY - "Dona Hor-
miga," a three-act comedy, will be
presented by La Sociedad Hispani-
ca at 3 p.m. and again at 8 p.m.
in Lydia Mendelssohn theatre.
Tickets may be purchased at the
Lydia Mendelssohn box office be-
tween 2 and 8 p.m.
CLEVELAND TICKETS-Tick-

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ets for the Cleveland Club mem-
ber's special Spring vacation bus
to Cleveland may be purchased
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily in the
Union lobby. The bus will leave
at 3:30 p.m. Friday from the
Union.
* * *
POLITICAL SCIENCE CON-
FERENCE-A student "Little For-
eign Minister's Conference" will
highlight the Graduate Political
Science Round Table at 7:45 p.m.
in Rackham Amphitheatre.
', , -c
Events Tomorrow
BYZANTINE MUSIC - Prof.
Oliver Strunk of Princeton Uni-
versity will discuss "Byzantine
Music and Hymnology" at 4:15
p.m. in Rackham'Amphitheatre.
JAPANESE LECTURE-Dr. Jiro
Harada, Japanese author and lec-
ttrer will speak on "Japanese
Gardens" at the Rackham Am-
phitheatre at 4:15 p.m.
Coming Events
ENGINEER'S CONVENTION -
The Michigan Engineering So-
ciety's 71st annual convention will
be held here Friday and Saturday
under the sponsorship of the Ann
Arbor Engineers' Club.
spend Summer 1951 in
ISRAEL
-see the country
-work in settlements
-study at University
Write to: Intercollegiate
Zionist Federatioh of America
131 West 14th St.,
New York, N.Y.

Students interested in public
health yesterday got an inside
view of the elaborate equipment
used by the School of Public
Health in its research program,
and heard Dean Henry F.'Vaughn
outline the varied opportunities in
the field.
A tour through the building in-
cluded the experimental labora-
tories where influenza and polio
research is being done and the
Radio Isotope Laboratory where
the electron microscope is being
used in bacteria research.
DEAN VAUGHN pointed out
that the undergraduate. program
offers work in two phases of pub-
lic health-health administration
and sanitary science. The discus-
sion emphasized the importance
of a broad background in the bio-
lo,gicai and natural sciences as
well as work in other related fields.
Job opportunities in health
administration include teaohing
Barbershop Group
Will SAingAgain
The barbershop quartet has
finally returned to campus after
an absence of about eight years,
this time masquerading under the
title of "PSURFS."
Since its beginning early this
semester, the barbershop group has
grown considerably, but new sing-
ers are always welcome, Chuck
Thatcher, faculty adviser, de-
clared.
The group will meet at 7:30 p.m.
today in the Union.%

and training of personnel, re-
search, and the application of
research through public health
agencies.
Work in the field of sanitary
science involves working with peo-
ple in education, enforcement of
health measures and the investi-
gation of health problems.
Interested students who desire
specific information about the
curriculum may make an appoint-
ment at the public health school
for this purpose.
AudienceWill
:DiscussPlay
The psychological implications
and literary worth of Ibsen's "The
Master Builder" Will be discussed
after tonight's performance of the
play by the Arts Theatre Club.
Three faculty members will lead
the discussion in which the whole
audience will take part.
The faculty men participating
will be Prof. Daniel R. Miller of
the psychology department, Prof.
Theodore M. Newcomb of the psy-
chology and sociology departments
and Harry Bergholz of the German
department.
PatNewhall, member of the
club's acting group, who handled
the arrangements for the affair,
said that this is the first of a pro-
jected series of discussions. "We
plan to have a discussion at least
once during the run of each of our
remaining plays," Miss Newhall
said.

UniqueHonor
BOSTON-Prof. Hobart H. Wil-
lard of the chemistry department
will receive unique recognition here
today at the annual meeting of the
American Chemical Society.
For the first time in the recol-
lection of members of the Society,
all the scientific papers to be read
in a full day seminar are being
presented by former students of
one chemist, Prof. Willard.
Twenty-one papers dealing with
various new discoveries in chem-
istry will be given by 19 of Prof.
Willard's erstwhile pupils here at
the University. He has been on
the faculty for 45 years.
AIM Makes Bid
For Outside Men
A new system to bring outside
independents into its organization
has been devised b'Y the Associa-
tion of Independent Men.
Under the new set-up, any in-
dependent living outside the resi-
dence halls may get a vote in
AIM by submitting a petition with
25 names on it, which is subject
to approval by AIM.

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CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA
No. 5, IN E-FLAT, Op. 73 ("Emperor")
(Beethoven) Artur Schnabel, Pianist, with
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Stock, Cond.
WCT-19 6.00
LCT-1015 5.45
CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA
No. 1, n B-FLAT MINOR, Op. 23
(Tchaikovsky) Vladimir Horowitz, Pianist,
with Arturo Toscanini and the NBC Symphony
Orchestra.
WCT-16 4.90
LCT-1012 5.45
CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA
IN D, Op. 61 (Beethoven)
Jascha Heifetz, Violinist, with Arturo Tosca-
nini and the NBC Symphony Orchestra.
WCT-14 6.00
LCT-1010 5.45
PIANO QUARTET No. 1, IN C MINOR, Op. 15
(Foure) Artur Rubinstein, Pianist, with Mem-
bers of the Paganini Quartet.
WDM-1493 4.90
LM-52 4.45
SYMPHONY No. 7, IN A, Op. 92
(Beethoven)
Arturo Toscanini and Philharmonic
Symphony Orchestra of New York
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DIVERTIMENTO FOR VIOLIN, VIOLA AND
'CELLO IN E-FLAT, K. 563 (Mozart)
Joscha Heifetz, Violinist; William Primrose,
Violist; Emanuel Feuermarin, 'Cellist.
WCT-27 4.90
LCT-1021 5.45
DOUBLE CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND
'CELLO IN A MINOR, Op. 102 (Brahms)
Jascha Heifetz, Violinist, and Emanuel Feuer-
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Ormandy, Cond.
WCT-21 4.90
LCT-1016 5.45
HAMLET
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Artur Rubinstein, Pianist; Jascha Heifetz,
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WDM-1487 3.80

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