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April 04, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE'

TITF MWTITEAN ATTY PAGE ) IV

Co-sponsored
Home Nursing
Course Offered
League, Red Cross
To Give Information
On Atomic Wounds
In conjunction with the Wash-
tenaw chapter of the Red Cross,
the League is sponsoring a course
on Home Nursing which will offer
information to women on atomic
wounds and burns as well as the
general care of the patient.
Women interested in the course
may sign up this week in the Un-
dergraduate Office of the League
or may gall Lydia Wilhelm, 25631.
The course, which will begin af-
ter spring vacation, will take a
total of 14 hours. It will be divid-
ed into sessions lasting two hours
each week.
THE FIRST meeting has been
tentatively set for 4 p.m. Tues-
day, April 17. After final confir-
mation it will either be posted in
the Daily Official Bulletin, or wo-
men who signed up will be notified
personally.
For the first lesson, the pro-
gram will be planned around the
identification of disease through
symptoms and the methods of
keeping a daily record of the
patient's temperature, pulse and
respiration.
Those attending the second ses-
sion will learn how to make an
occupied bed. Posture habits for
the patient and nurse will also be
discussed.
THE GENERAL care of the pa-
tient will be the topic of the third
session, while the fourth lesson
will deal with the preparation of
liquid diets and treatment of ato-
mic burns.
Methods of carrying out treat-
ments prescribed by a doctor
will be the subject of the fifth
lesson .
The sixth session will deal with
the control of communicable dis-
eases.
Those who are interested but
unable to attend the first meeting,
may still sign up for the course
or a new meeting time can be ar-
ranged.
Dormitory Presidents
There will be no meeting of
dormitory presidents today.

Athletic Group
Will Convene
On 'U' Campus
Four hundred women represent-
ing at least 40 states will meet on
campus April 10 through 13 for
the 13th convention of the Athle-
tic Federation of College Women.
Theme of the convention is: "To
unite; to share; to learn."
* * * -
SCHOOLS WHICH are planning
this year's event are: Michigan
State Normal, Michigan State, Ad-
rian, Hillsdale, Albion and Central
Michigan colleges; Port Huron
and Highland Park junior colleg-
es; and the University, all mem-
bers of the Athletic Federation of
Michigan College Women.
Delegates will be housed in
Alice Lloyd Hall, where registra-
tion will take place.
Welcoming speeches will be
given by President Alexander G.
Ruthven and Dr. Margaret Bell,
chairman of the women's physical
education department.
WEDNESDAY will be devoted to
group dynamics centering around
the theme: "Problems in the Oper-
ation of WAA's." An address by
Dr. Alvin Zander, director of re-
search in group dynamics, will
launch the activities.
Dr. Laurie Campbell, associate
professor in the women's physi-
cal education department and
chairman of the National Sec-
tion of Women's Athletics, will
address the Thursday morning
session on "The Relationship of
AFCW to NSWA."
"You've Got What It Takes;
Will You Use It?" is the title of
Thursday afternoon's talk by Elsa
Schneider, specialist in health in-
struction and physical education,
Office of Education.

WOMEN TOO SMART?
College President Cites Cause
For View Toward Intelligence

-Daily-Roger Reinke
PLANNING AHEAD-The group above is shown discussing the problems and activities of independent
women at Assembly Workshop. Asembly Association's plans for next year were also discussed in
the Workshop which was held last Saturday, in the League. All those attending, including house
presidents, big sister chairmen and activities chairmen, ate lunch at the League.

OPPORTUNITY CALLS:
Careers Open to Women in Scientific Field
4)

"Do men really like intelligent
women?" is the question most fre-
quently asked of Lynn White, Jr.,
president of Mills College in Cali-
fornia.
Dr. White stated that the be-
lief that men do not like intelli-
gent women can be attributed to
the different rate of maturity in
boys and girls.
* * *
AT HIGH SCHOOL age boys,
generally less mature mentally
and physically than girls, are
placed in unfair competition with
their classmates of the opposite
sex. In rebellion they develop a
dislike for intelligent women.
Dr. White added that this
feeling sometimes continues into
the first years of college and
usually evaporates before grad-
uation.
Another theory which Dr. White
presented is that the qualities that
the mature man wants in his wife
are best developed in non-co-edu-
cational colleges.
THE STRUCTURE of a women's
college builds up her confidence
and dynamism, Dr. White pointed
out.
"In co-educational classes,
men who ask questions think of
the questions, while women who
ask questions think first of the
effect their words might have on
"business Careers
{ ) VIAr
COLLGE
4-MONTH INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING for
COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUATES
Starting June, October, February
Bulletin A, on request.
Registration now open.
3 NEXT COURSE STARTS JUNE 11
Lifetime Placement Service
Write Admission Counselor
Co-Educational " G. I. Approved
THE GREGG COLLEGE
87 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago 8, Illinois
Phone Slate 2-1880

the men's opinion of them," he
said.
To back his theory Dr. White
stated that the marriage rate of
girls who attend women's colleges,
Catholic women's colleges ex-
cluded, is much higher than that
of women in co - educational
schools.
Petitions Due Friday at
Undergraduate Office'
For Panhellenic Board
Petitions for Panhellenic Board
posts will be due Friday, April 20
in the League Undergraduate Of-
fice.
Interviews for the positions will
be held Monday through Friday
of the following week, April 23 to
28.
Several duties of the members
of the PanhelsBoard have been
clarified, and the explanations are
posted in the League Undergradu-
ate Office.

ENJOY YOUR new-found freedom.
capture the one-ness of heart and mind
you've yearned for, revel in a honey-
moon dream come true in the perfect
privacy of a little cottage all your ow..
hidden in purple hills, beside a dashing
stream.
LAZY MORNINGS (breakfast until
11:00). Wonderful meals in jolly com-
pany. Magnificent loafing or vigorous
outdoor life.
OPEN ALL YEAR for newly married
couples only: likeable young folks start.
ingdmarried life together. Mention dates,
and we'll send our helpful "Three
Honeymoon Plans" and complete in-
formation.
THE FARM ON THE HILL
SWIFTWATER, PA. Bol 8500
Read Daily Classifieds

I I

(EDITOR'S NOTE-This is the third
in a series of articles concerning car-
eers for women.)
By JO KETELHUT
The college woman whose in-
terests and aptitudes have led her
to specialize in one of the many
technical fields may be wondering,
Union Offers
Music, Cards
Students may take a last whirl
before vaaction at the weekly en-
tertainment program to be pre-
sented from 7:30 to 10 p.m. today
in the Union.
Sponsored by both the League
and Union, the program is held
every other week to provide stu-
dents with a mid-week break from
studying.
Records will be played for danc-
ing and cards will be available
for bridge and canasta games.
After vacation, the program will
be moved to the League, where it
will be held for the remainder of
the semester.

"What can a woman do in sci-
ence?"
Her particular training may di-
rect her to a fascinating and prof-
itable career, since opportunities
for women in science are almost
endless.
Such opportunities usually are
limited only by one's capabilities
rather than by sex. While the
medical profession is still some-
what restricted in its acceptance
of women, the related fields seem
to be singularly lacking in preju-
dice and frequently welcome and
encourage women scientists.
* * *
WOMEN WHO have an inclina-
tion towiard mathematics, physics
or various combinations of sciencesE
may find interesting jobs as ex-1
aminers and searchers in govern-
ment patent work.
Some women with training in
science and in legal procedure
have become successful patent
attorneys.
The technical librarian plays an
important part in scientific re-
search. She is trained in. both
science and library work. Besides
a job in a university or medical
library, she may find opportuni-
ties in the library of an industrial
company, an army medical li-
brar , the patent office or in the
libraries of research organiza-
tions.
* * * i

writing, there is opportunity for
free lance journalism as well as
for writing and editing scientific
articles, papers and magazines.
Women also can excel in the
field of technical illustration.
Diagrams and illustrations for
textbooks, manuals and guide
books are made either from '
drawings or photographs.
Biological supply houses, muse-
ums and research foundations re-
quire scientific artists to illustrate
pubhcations. Women are hired by
them as well as by the United
States Department of Agriculture
and other federal agencies.
* * *
THERE HAS always been a de-
mand for technical secretaries and
stenographers by the executives
of chemical manufacturing plants
and research institutions.
The scientific secretary hand-
les correspondence, takes and
types reports and maintains
files. Part of her time is spent
in the laboratory taking down
observations, keeping records
and doing similar tasks.
Museum work appeals to many
women. This field ranges from
collecting and mounting specimens
to acting as curator of special de-
partments. Tracking down speci-
mens may even lead her to thel
far corners of the world.
* * *
THE WOMAN interested in
technical work may become a
medical technician or medical
technologist for which specific
training is required. The majority
of technicians in hospital or medi-
cal laboratories and in public
health organizations are women.
For further information con-
cerning the varied opportunities
whcih are open to women in the
scientific world, bulletins a r e
available from the U.S. Depart-
ment of Commerce and of Labor,
and from the American Associa-
tion of University Women.

I

Bowling

Club

T h i s week Bowling Club
members will have the last op-
portunity to complete their ten
games for participation points.
The club will conclude its acti-
vities Friday.

I

I

ii
ty P4
To cut or not to cut--
that is the question for
spring! Let us create °
k the hair-do most becom-
nging to you.
&aeAer 2al o
601 East Liberty
<'<dO OC o

i
it

THE t adhaI
INSURED HOME OWNERSHIP PLAN
is NOW available to
Residents of Ann Arbor
First Payment Guarantees Home Mortgage Free If You Die
Premiums Waived During Disability
Liberal Discount for Annual Payments,
Pays DOUBLE in Event of Death by Accidental Means
Modernize Your Present Mortgage
Re-Finance Your Land Contract
Conventional, F.H.A., and G.I. Mortgage Loans
IiILLIAM A. CLOSE, Special Agent
208 Nickels Arcade Phones 7008-6625

Sturdy . . . Lightweight
TOPGRAIN COWHIDE LUGGAGE
for the man who travels

1'' l

Two Matched Pieces
for the pric eof one

4995
Plus tax

FOR
woman

THE scientifically trained
who has an aptitude for

!: = "

EAT AT CO-OPS
Student cooperatives are now
accepting applications for
Summer and Fall memberships.
For information phone 2-22-18

:11

A/I /$ 'd' a$ ha
.we dbe #dAptC/a
The
CLINIC SHOE'
TRADE MARK REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. AND CANADA
Sizes 31/s tol11
Widths AAAA to C
6 styles to choose from
9 and 95
Clinics are a joy to wear.
Soft and flexible, they give
the support essential to foot
comfort. See how much fresh-

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A gabardine lined, ginger-toned cowhide duo,
the two-suitor and companion case in finer top
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carrying weight, solid brass locks and two-turn
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top-seamed handled for easy lifting.

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