100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 25, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE:

TH1~ MTCTTTIAN DAILY PAGE
U

I

itJ Jf Ca oCi

i

By JO KETTLEHUT
A couple of knitting needles, a ball of yarn-and she's off to
complete her 16th pair of argyles.
The click of knitting needles may have music to charm many a
coed away from an open history book, but it's slow torture for the
prof when the needle-rhythms add unnecessary sound effects to his
lecture.
THE COMPLETED SLEEVE of Bill's new royal-blue sweater may
fascinate Bill and the coed who spent three days of concentrated labor
on it, but the taxicab driver wants to keep his eyes on the road.
Which brings us to the precis that knitting has a place in
this world-but not in a classroom, a taxicab or a movie theater.
And this brings to mind a local-interest story which will serve
to illustrate the pitfalls into which the knitting-conscious coed might

i

tumble. *
PLACE: An Ann Arbor movie house. Time: One Sunday evening.
Who: A coed and her date. What: Two knitting needles, a ball of
yarn and the first 14 rows of an uncompleted sweater. Result: A
minor riot!A
The young man casta slightly raised eyebrow and a doubtful
glance at our heroine as they walked toward State Street. His
date was swinging a knitting bag on her arm, and he didn't know
how that would fit in with plans for the evening which included
a movie.
The night began with the usual pattern of action-purchasing
of tickets, removing of coats, stopping at the popcorn stand and
stumbling in the dark to find two vacant seats.
* * * *
BUT SOMETHING was added-the opening of a knitting bag
J and removing of two needles, a ball of nylon yarn and 14 rows of an
uncompleted sweater.
n4Tense moments of silence in the film werebroken by the
clicking of knitting needles, "Oh I dropped some stitches," and
"Harry, hold my ball of yarn."
"Look," cried the coed, "I have four more rows finished." Harry
looked at the four completed rows of knitting-and missed the only
murder scene in the film.
THE COED AND HER DATE had arrived in the middle of the
film and decided to leave when the scenes began repeating. They
headed for State Street again.
Upon reaching the front door of the theater, the coed, feeling
a restraining force around her ankles, stopped. Glancing down,
she found to her amazement a lasso of yarn about her feet. She
glanced up to find Harry holding a pair of empty knitting needles
in his hands and looking rather surprised.
A slightly embarrassed gasp escaped from the coed and a slightly
disgusted, "Oh, no," sounded forth from the young man. The two
dashed back into the theater past the guffawing ticket-taker and
down the aisle, following the stream of pink yarn all the way.
PEOPLE WALKING into the theater had not observed the yarn
which caught on their coats as they scrambled to find seats. People
leaving the theater gathered the unobserved yarn on their ankles-
and led a trail of tangled yarn up and down the aisle.
Ushers came rushing down the aisles with flashlights to assist
the helpless movie fans~
"Lift the right foot up, turn around, now the left foot," were the
whispered instructions which accompanied the movie's "John, it's you
I really love" dialogue.
, . *. ,
HARRY AND HIS DATE were busily winding up the stray threads
of yarn as everything from "quiet" to "aw, shut up" echoed through-
out the theater.
Finally, one man, weary of the confusion, and interested in
the outcome of the movie, offered his knife and advice, "cut the
blasted yarn and forget about it."
Harry and the coed left the theater-minus one ball of yarn and
eighteen rows of Harry's sweater.
Harry got the new sweater for his birthday-bought at a local
store.

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED-Mr. and Mrs. Harold I. Chandler
of Keene, N.H. have announced the engagement of their daughter,
Martha, to James H. Poppy, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Harry Poppy
of Iron Mountain. Miss Chandler is a senior in the College of
Architecture and Design. Her fiance, a freshman in the University
medical school, is affiliated with Phi Rho Sigma, medical frater-
nity. The couple is planning a June wedding.
NO MORE TUGGING:
New Formal Trend Achieves
That 'Bare Yet Covered Look'

Hillel, Wyvern,
Union Groups'
Events Slated
Solutions for the problem of
spring fever will be featured
at the Spring Tonic Mixer to be
held from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday at
the Union.
Located in the building's North
Lounge, the mixer will feature
dancing to the music of the na-
tion's outstanding dance bands,
via records.
Joel Sabastian, of station WE-
QN, will announce the records and
Jay Mills, master of ceremonies
at the recent Gulantics Review
will offer a program of entertain-
ment.
In addition, there will be 175
hostesses representing the various
dormitories and sororities on cam-
pus.
Concluding the day of relaxa-
tion will be the Wishing Well Ball
to be presented from 9 p.m. to
midnight Saturday in the Union
Ballroom.
Wyvern
A recorded concert hour spon-
sored by Wyvern, women's junior
honorary society, will be held from
7 to 9 p.m. today on the second
floor of the League.
Selections will be chosen from
the current works being studied
by music literature classes. This
will include several of the follow-
ing: Beethoven's 5th Symphony,
Mozart's Symphony in G Minor,
Mozart's Haeffner Symphony,
Haydn's 88th Symphony, and
Tchaikovsky's 5th and 6th Sym-
phonies.
The concert will be audible on
the concourse, second floor of the
League where one may study or
just sit and listen.
Anyone interested in hearing
these selections may attend.
Hillel
Second in the series of all time
film favorites, "Ivan the Terrible"
will be presented by the Hillel As-
sociation at 7 p.m. today at Lane
Hall.
The film is an Eisenstein pro-
duction and features music by
Prokofieff.
There will be two more film pre-
sentations in the series.

, 1
j..a.
\; ,,
.
. ,
...y
r _.9>

Important
New Dresses
New dresses with great
excitement and beauty,
from COILINS complete
Spring into Summer
collection. Each an
exquisite fashion-a fresh
new silhouette-a
triumph of elegant taste.
Sizes 9 to 15,
l0to20

,
43
.--,.
/ .

rom

17 95

4

That "bare, yet covered look"
is forecast for spring and summer
formals this year.
Most of the gowns which are
now being advertised and shown
in shops have some form of "cov-
ering up", and yet still effect that
"bare" look.
'* * $
SOME OF THE dresses have
tiny or large, straps, some have
tiny jackets. Others have attach-
ed stoles, and many have coverings
of sheer material.
1 One strapless pure silk paper
taffeta gown with a gold embos-
sed pring (now being shown in a
local store) has tiny detached
short sleeves, which afford that
more covered look, while the
shoulders are actually bare.
This new trend has developed
out of the demands of women who
have become tired of tugging at
their low, strapless gowns, and are
uncomfortable in a dress with a
great deal of boning.
* * *
MANY SHOPS and stores are
now beginning to feature their
new lines of warm weather form-
als. Fashion experts advise that it
is never too early to start looking
them over when one is in the mar-
ket for a new formal, or just wants
ideas for making over an old one.
A varied array of maierials
are being shown this season.

Most of therfabrics are the
"filmy and frothy" type, al-
though taffetas and other heav-
ier materials are still appearing.
Chiffons, marquisettes, organ-
dies, nets, laces, organzas, and
even dotted swisses are among
the softer materials.
Colors are predominently cool
pastel shades along with that
warm weather favorite, white.
Darker colors, especially navy-
blue, have a trimming of white or
other light colors for that touch
of coolness.
Softness seems to be the by-
word. The materials, colors and
styles all accent this. The full
skirts have a floaty feminine qual-
ity, even the ballerina type. The
styles are soft and feminine.

COLLINTS

... /) cL6eP1

at ayar

yi
* DalytsClassifieds Bring Quick esults *k

With many cold and windy Michigan days ahead--
you'll be needing a warm topper to see you through
this and seasons ahead.
We have short shorties, three-quarter lengths and
full length pyramids, if you prefer, in many shades
and lovely fabrics of 100% wool gabardine, fleeces,
chungtones and ottoman failles-all by the leading : f
makers of impeccable tailoring.
PRINTZESS
} LASSIE
PO SPORTOWNE
STYL INE
( P17ced ( Ptn 99
Sides 7-15, 8-20,
" " : l2 %-20 V

Rayon Suits for Juniors
with all the peerless mannerisms
of the finest wool worsteds
The same scrupulous tailoring, the same styling
found in superb worsted suits.., now adapted to
full-bodied rayon suits by the samemanufacturer...
with stiffened hips for a precise line and careful
shaping for an all-over purity of silhouette.
Left: Spun rayon mixture suit, carefully detailed
at the pockets. Navy or brown. Right: Rayon
sharkskin suit, with a rounded jacket and a narrow
skirt. Navy, brown or beige. Both in sizes 7 to 17.
29.95

s

iA

",.
r 1

i ,
u
iC-
'

"
i
tit}

N

I

AL sm

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan