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March 25, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY'

PAGEĀ° T

PAGE T

'U' Bands

To Star in
RKO Short
The University marching and
symphony bands will be the sub-
jects of a "This Is America" short
film, which will be released some-
time this spring.
Produced by the RKO Studios
of Hollywood, the film will be dis-
tributed to about 8,000 theatres in
the United States and abroad and
will be seen by an estimated 40
million people.
* * *
BEGINNING the week before
classes start in the fall, the movie
will depict the bands' activities
through the June commencement.
Outdoor shots of the march-
ing band will, be filmed'at Ferry
Field and the Stadium. Moving
pictures taken at the North-
western-Michigan game last fall
will also be used while addition-
al shots will be taken this
spring.
The film will include small
groups in practice as well as the
entire band practicing fundamen-
tal marching steps which eventu-
ally are used in the band's half-
time gridiron show.
Shots of the symphony band
will be staged as an open air con-
cert. Prof. William D. Revelli, con-
ductor of the bands, will direct
excerpts f r o m the "Michigan
Rhapsody," a colorful arrange-
ment of famous University songs.
Barry Play To
Be Held Over
An extra performance of "Hotel
Universe" will be presented by the
Arts Theatre Club at 8 p.m. to-
morrow.
The Philip Barry play was orig-
inally scheduled to end tonight,
but club Business Manager Ed
Troupin said that to accommo-
date all the club's members and
4 guests who wanted to see the play,
the extra performance had to be
added.
Troupin said, however, that this
would be the only extra perform-
ance because the rest of the week
will be needed to get the group's
next production, "The Master
Builder," by Isben, set up.

TO OPEN WEDNESDAY:
Stage Being Set for Annual Union Opera

By BOB KEITH
Props, canvas, stage-hands and
production chiefs filled the stage
of the Michigan Theatre yesterday
as the Union Opera, "Go West-
Madam," moved in for a gay and
gaudy three-day stand this week.
With only a few days remaining
before the opening curtain, Opera
men watched earnestly as a com-
plex array of lights and special ef-
fects went into place backstage.
DIRECTING OPERATIONS was
scenery designer Robert Mellen-
camp, a Whitmore Lake resident
Opera Photo Contest
The Union Opera is sponsor-
ing a photography contest-
with $15 in prizes as incentive.
Dress rehearsals tomorrow
and Tuesday mornings in the
Michigan Theatre will be open
to any photographer who wants
to try his luck at winning a $10
first prize or a $5 second prize
for good promotional pictures.
Opera staffmen asked that
entries be turned in Wednes-
day at the Opera office in the
Union.

1i

Campus
Calendar
A PHOTOGRAPHIC "Sculpture
Lesson" will go on display at 8 am.
tomorrow in the architecture col-
lege and will be shown from 8 a.m.
to 10 p.m. daily except Sunday un-
til April 6.
* * *
"HOUSING AND HEALTH" will
be discussed by Dr. C-E. A. Win-
slow, of Yale University, at 4 p.m.
tomorrow in the public health
school auditorium.
PROF. EDGAR WAUGH, of
Michigan State Normal College,
Democraticdcandidate fornState
Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion, will address Phi Delta Kappa
education fraternity at 6 p.m. to-
morrow in the Union.
* * *
"ANCIENT EGYPTIAN LIV-
ING" is featured in an exhibition
at the newly reopened archeology
museum.
'I

LOOK and LISTEN
with HARRY REED
Bringing TV back to normal for"legal question of the indignity of4"brates his 84th birthday today--
a day, Faye Emerson and Skitch television cameras and the rights pity the messenger boy who has
Henderson will sub for the Kefau- of the witness, Sen. Kefauver has to sing happy birthday to him. The
ver proceedings when they de- written to Francis McCall, NBC's aged maestro is scheduled to re-
scribe New York City's Fifth Ave- director of television news and turn as musical director of the
nue Easter Parade at noon today special events: NBC symphony next fall if his
over WWJ-TV and at 12:30 p.m. "ss health permits. He's slated to
over WJBK-TV. "The question ofnCostellos conduct 12 of the 22 concerts.
right to object to being televised -______________
Mayor and Mrs. Vincent Im- is as yet undetermined by law
pellitteri will officially open the and in view of the fact that our
holy-day cakewalk, which will be committee expires March 31 we NOW your favorite
caught by four mobile TV units felt it would be unwise to en-
opposite St. Patrick's Cathedral, danger the possibility of having STRAIGHT-LINE
and Miss Emerson, the girl who his testimony by insisting on
put the V in TV, and her husband his being televised."
will interview celebrities when not The Kefauver program, which
describing the parading fashion many claim has stopped spring
plates. cleaning, emptied theatres and
stalled Red Cross drives all over
ALTHOUGH the popular Frank the country, has also led to the 1 SHORT
Costello finally allowed his visage selection by the Custom Tailors'
to be pictured on video screens Guild of chief committee counsel SLIP in ME DI U
across the country in a between- Rudolph Halley as one of the best-
questions interview, he still re- dressed men in television. LONG
fuses to be televised while an- * * *
swering charges. Regarding the ARTURO TOSCANINI cele-
W KITE NV-BUCK
OXFORDS
95-
with RED RUBBER SOLES
and SPRING HEELS
-.

?4acr0! At

, P

who builds sets for the Detroit
Civic Light Opera when he is not
working on local projects.
Mellencamp's chief assign-
ment in "Go West-Madam"
was to create an old-time bar-
room set with two acting levels-
one for the bar and the other
for an upstairs bedroom.
Complicating things was the re-
quirement that the set be built in
sections--to facilitate transporta-
tion during the Opera's spring
road trip-but Mellencamp solved
the problem with a large assort-
ment of hooks, nuts and bolts.
* *f *
MELLENCAMP also had a hand
in a number of special stage tech-
niques with which the audience
will be treated when the show
opens Wednesday night.
Special green and red glasses
will be passed out among the
spectators for one scene. It's a
silhouette affair, jerformea be-
hind a white muslin curtain.
When the glasses are put on,

COLLAPSIBLE BAR ROOM - Union Opera scenery designer
Robert Mellencamp, (left) looks on as his assistant, Al Graf, puts
up the upper acting level of a set representing an old-time western
bar room. The scenery was built in a barn on the outskirts of
Ann Arbor and moved into the Michigan Theatre yesterday. The
Opera will be presented here Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

I

however, the scene appears three
dimensional and huge undefined
objects are made to look as if they
are being thrown out at the audi-
ence.
Other specialties include a
"blacklight" Indian dance with
luminescent wooden hoops and a
bedroom scene behind a "scrim,"
which is a sheer scenery cloth that
can be made to look either opaque
or transparent, depending on how
it's lighted.

PILFER PLOTS:
Hollywoot
' ~ E

ci,

A few $2.40 seats for the Wed-
nesday and Thursday night shows
can still be purchased in the Union
lobby and plenty of $1.20 and $1.80
tickets are left for the Friday mati-
nee.

NOW AT
DOWNTOWN STORE
-
DELISO DEB
SHOES
alive with youth and brimming
with Spring Fashion News! . .
THE SHOES you see in leading fashion magazines . . .
the shoes you love to live in. Now here they are in a
new-for-Spring flurry of new silhouettes, new details,

Makes peare
Share Trait
Hollywood writers and "Shakes-
peare have at least one thing in
common, according to Prof. G. B.
Harrison, of the English Depart-
ment.
"Movie script writers use any-
thing in the way of a story or plot
they can lay their hands on and
that's just what Shakespeare did,"
Prof. Harrison explained.
He cited as all example "Romeo
and Juliet," which will be pre-
sented locally by Play Production
Wednesday through Saturday in
Lydia Mendelssohn theatre.
Shakespeare got the story for
his play from the poem "Romeus
and Juliet," which was written in
1562 by Arthur Brooks, a fellow
Englishman, Prof. Harrison said.
"The difference between Shake-
speare and the script writers,"
Prof. Harrison declared, "lies in
what Shakespeare did with his
stories after he got them. There
Hollywood is left far behind."
Public sale of tickets for the
upcoming production of "Romeo
and Juliet" will open at 10 a.m.
tomorrow in the Mendelssohn
Theatre box office. Tickets are
priced at $1.20 and 90 and 60
cents.
Special tickets, priced at 60
cents are available for students
for. Wednesday and Thursday
night.

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