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March 22, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-22

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THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1951

THE' MICHIGAN DAILY

GROUPS MAKE

$976.14:

Cinema Guild Aids 11 Organizations.

PAGE TMEE
YD, YR WORK ON ELECTION:
Political Groups Plan Spring Programs

By PAUL MARX
Eleven campus organizations
have enriched their coffers by
$976.14 through co-sponsorships
of movies with the Student Legis-
lature's Cinema -Guild.
A Guild financial statement for
the first 14 productions of the
year also revealed that four groups
suffered losses totaling $204.89 on
Guild movies.
BUT THREE of the four groups
will be given new co-sponsorships
this semester or next to allow
them to erase their losses and re-
alizte profits, according to Irv
Stenn, chairman of the Cinema
Guild Board. The fourth organi-

zation, The Chess Club has fail-
ed to come out ahead after being
given two co-sponsorships and
will receive no further special con-
sideration, Stenn said.
Despite losing money on four
productions, Stenn pointed out
that the Cinema Guild Board
was very pleased with the re-
suits of its first five months of
operation. The board is a re-
vamped edition of the former
Art Cinema League which oper-
ated through last summer.
"We will continue to do our
best to bring good movies to Ann
Arbor and financially aid student
organizations."

Construction Watched with
Blueprints from Angell Hall

As the Board operates now,'
there is always a certain amount
of risk ,involved in co-sponsoring
movies, Stenn continued. Poor
weather will mean a smaller audi-
ence no matter how good an at-
traction the film may be. Another
determining factor is in deciding,
whether a particular film should'
be shown at Hill Auditorium or
Architecture Auditorium. The ren-
tal for the latter is much less.
BAD WEATHER and choices of
the wrong theatre were mainly
responsible for three of the losses.
The two Chess Club losses were
due to poor cooperation on their
part in publicizing their produc-
tions, Stenn said.
However, to avoid being
caught in the embarrassing sit-
uation of asking an organiza-
tion to make up losses suffer-
ed in undertaking of a co-spon-
sorship, Stenn plans to intro-
duce a motion in SL later this
semester calling for a pool of all
profits made on movies
throughout the year.
Under this proposal the total
profits would be divided among
all co-sponsoring organizations
according to a pre-assigned per-
centage.
Such a plan would mean that
no group would suffer a loss un-
less there was a net loss for the
entire year of movies, which is ex-
tremely unlikely, Stenn explained.t

By HARRY REED
The University Plant Depart-
ment has finally come to the res-
cue of frustrated Angell Hall coIf-
struction watchers.
With several sets of plans of the
new addition scattered around
vintage points in the stairs and
windows, long-puzzled students
are beginning to see just what is
what on the job, and they like it.
"THE PLANS are a great help,"
Nancy Van Kirk, '54SM, said,
watching the job from a landing
window, "but bleachers along the
fence will be much better once it
gets warm."r
'Plant Department Superinten-
dent Walter Roth explained the
appearance of the plans by the
growing size of the crowd
watching. "There's no way we
4. can help them outside, like
bleachers, but we can help them
understand the job better by
floor plans inside Angell Hall."
The pouring of concrete founda-
tions and excavations with the
large steam shovel continue to be
chief attractions, but the every-
day jobs of building forms and
laying steel for reinforcement is
always good for several score of
onlookers.
Concern over the design and
planning of the addition was
voiced by a few aesthetes. "I
wonder how eight modern stories
are going to look from State St.
projecting over the Grecian col-
umns of Angell Hall," one in-
structor mumbled. Speculation
Remember
HER on
MOTHER'S
DAY
with a PORTRAIT
she will cherish?

over the large square court which
was unmarked on the plans rose
from a swimming pool to "a cool
patio with a fountain and some
ferns."
Another point of agreement was
the slow rise of the building. One
excuse was offered by Nan Taylor,
'52, who reasoned, "If they took
the men who are always moving
fences around and putting up
wooden houses and put them to
work on the addition it might go
a lot faster."

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
SINGING SOLICITORS-Wym Price, Grad, and Phyllis Butters
worth, '51, braved the cold yesterday to attract students to the
Worl'd Student Service Fund booth on the diag, while Milly Laiti-
nen, '52, stood ready to receive money or pledges for the interna-
tional relief organization.
A nn A rbor Literary Level
Found To Be 'High Class'

By ZANDER HOLLANDER
With spring elections only two
weeksaway, the Young Democrats
and Young Republicans are in the
midst of campaigning this week,
but their rivals, the Young Pro-
gressives seemed likely to be sit-
ting on the sidelines for the April
2 contest.
Officials of the two older clubs
asserted that their groups' activi-
ties are centering on the local cam-
paign for city posts and the race
for the two open seats on the
Board of Regents.
OFFICERS of the Young Pro-
gressives however, were apparent-
ly unaware of the fact that state
Progressives had two nominees for
th. Board until informed by The
Daily..Even then, Joan Berler, '54,
YP president, said that the club
would take no part in the cam-
paign.
This decision is in line with
what Miss Berler said would be
the YP's main objective this year
-"a broad cultural program."
Although the Young Progressives
were adopting a hands-off policy
on the election, both YD and YR
were jumping headlong into the
campaign.
THE DEMOCRATS' campaign
began with a visit from Regents
candidate Wheaton Strom two
weeks ago and will continue with
canvassing operations, publicity
campaigns and poll-watching on
election day. Moreover, according
to YD president Don McNeil,
Grad., the club will hold a pre-
election workshop at which party
leaders will discuss the "meth-
odology of political parties."
Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

3

Newly-elected YR president
Dave Cargo, '51, looking past the
April election, emphasized the
importance of' the Big Ten YR
Conference in Madison next
month. Here, Cargo said, the
University's 20 delegates would
attempt to push through "several
constructively liberal policy reso-
lutions," including an FEPC pro-
posal and a civil rights motion.
As for the election campaign,
Cargo pointed out, the club has
already brought in state Republi-
can chairman Owen Cleary for one
YR discussion and will bring in
other speakers, among them a
labor leader and a congressman.
At the same time, he said, "YR
members will be working in close
coordination with local and state
Republican candidates throughout
the campaign."

a onderful
I IPEN STOCK
Wonderful- because you'll find one
to match your personality. A "buy"
because letter paper and envelopes
are packaged separately, so that you .
can use every sheet of paper, every
envelope -and always be able to get
more to match.

Although the YP are taking little
part in the spring contest-they are
carrying on a series of discussions,
according to former YP president
Gordon MacDougall. As far as
immediate activity was concerned,
MacDougall admitted thet the
group had been dormant so far,
except for its postcard-pamphlet
on the "McGee Case."
Graduate Council
Will MeetToday
The Graduate Student Council
will meet at 7:30 p;m. today in
the West Lecture Room of Rack-
ham.
Graduate student representa-
tion in the Student Legislature is
the topic to be discussed.

By RICH THOMAS
Ann Arbor is definitely a
class" town, according to
Stofflet, co-manager of a
news distributing agency.

"high
Ross
local

TV TAKES THE LEAD:
Detroit Movies Feel Loss as
Kefu.ver Trials Draw Crowds

I'

Drawing his conclusion from
the type of magazine sold to the
local citizenry, Stofflet asserted
that the pulp-Hollywood style ma-
gazine didn't hold a candle to
such top level ladies literature as
"Ladies Home Journal" or "Wa-
men's Home Companion."

Television, and especially the'
Kefauver trials, has been wreak-
ing havoc on movie attendance, ac -
cording tr' a spokesmen for a group
of Detroit theatre owners.
Theatre Club
Altes Opening
The Arts Theatre Club an-
nounced yesterday that plays pre-
sented by the group will open on
Friday nights from now on in-
stead of Tuesday nights as was
the previous practice.
The policy will take effect with
the club's third production, "The
Master Builder," by Henrik Ibsen
which has now been scheduled to
open on.March 30.
The new opening night is the
indirect result of a light epidemic
of flu which hit the acting com-
pany just before the opening of
the club's currentdproduction,
"Hotel Universe," Ed Troupin,
business manager, explained.
The illness of two actors in the
club's acting company forced a
three-day postponement of "Hotel
Universe's" opening. "Things
worked out so well, that we de-
cided to continue Friday night
openings indefinitely," Troupin
said.
If a demand develops for more
performances of any play, they
will be added at the end of the
regular run, he added.

At a r cent meeti xg protesting
con-cin.. ,g high tax assessments,
the g:,cu predicted that within
two T F sr:. half of the city's 181
:heatres would be forced to close
becam.e of the growing inroads be-
ing inade by television.
THE SITUATION has come to
such c state that owners can pre-
dict Houper ratings of various TV
shows by counting the number of
empty seats in their theaters.
Here in Ann Arbor, however,
none of the local theaters re-
ported any marked decrease in
the always com'iparatively slim
raid-week movie attendance.
Cna theater manager said that
t is the big stores that were pre-
paring for Easter sellouts that
must be suffering most from the
te1ev'ea investigatiens. A great
number of women are foregoing
ther si opping to view the pro-
c ed ngi..
And there is still standing room
at the Union for any students who
may wish to forego their usual af-
ternoon agenda.
Fuel Conference
Will CloseToday
The conference on "Combustion
of Industrial Fuels" will end today
in the Rackham Amphitheatre
with addresses by Prof. Donald
Katz and Prof. Clay Porter, both'
of the engineering college.

"The 'Home

Journal' alone," he

Easter Drama
To Be Given
As Monologue.
An unusual form of drama will
be presented at 7:30 p.m. tomor-
r o w in Pattengill Auditorium
when Dabney Montgomery, an
Ann Arbor resident and a member
of the Wesleyan Guild, presents a
one-man dramatic recital depict-
ing the Easter story.
Called "The Story of the Lamb,"
the drama will be narrated by
Montgomery in the first person,
and will depict the events in
Jesus' life from the time of the
Last Supper to the Ressurrection.
DURING THE course of the
narration Dabney will take on six
roles. He will play a shepherd on-
looker, Jesus, Peter, Judas, Mary
Magdalene and the mother of
Judas.
At one point in the play he
concurrently will play two roles.
Background music will be pro-
vided by recordings of Handel's
Messiah.
The drama has been arranged
entirely by Montgomery, who has
based his scenes on the Bible,
popular books such as Lloyd C.
Douglas' "The Robe" and "The
Big Fisherman" and various re-
ligious books.

said, "outsells all the movie queen
and horror fiction four or five to
one."
* * *
IN THE FIELD of men's maga-
zines, only "Esquire" sells to any
extent, Stofflet commented, while
the real "girlie" books can hardly
be given away.
Even in Ann Arbor's taste in
newspapers, Stoff let continued,
the "high class" trend is notic-
ed. "Next to the Detroit papers,
the 'New York Times' is the best
seller, with perhaps 1500 sub-
scription and news stand sales-
per day.
Surprisingly enough, for as large
a Republican stronghold as Ann
Arbor, the "Chicago Tribune"
sells only about 450 copies per day.
* * *
ON THE upswing in popular
editions. Stofflet cited pocket
book editions of all types as sell-
ing at a terrific rate. But even
here, he said the classics and
books by moderns like Heming-
way, Faulkner and Maugham are
holding their own against the
murder mysteries.
Although television, thus far,
doesn't appear to have hurt
magazine sales, Stofflet was
still a little wary of drawing any
conclusions.
"After all," he said, "a person
can't sit and watch TV three or
four hoursanight, and not do a
little less reading."
Officers, SL,
J-Hop Petitions
Due, InFriday

330 Maynard Street

Phone 8805

THE CRAFT PRESS

* PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S *

I I

amer
208 Michigan
Phone

Theater Bldg.
2-2072

-

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M y w 1 /

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* ee
Aye, it's a thr-r-rifty,
thr-r-rifty way to
SAVE!
OUR STUDENT BUNDLE

-J
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Q
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a
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ROY REID
Proprietor

Prices Effective Thursday,
Friday, Saturday
We Reserve the Right To Limit
Quantities.

POPULAR
CIGARETTES
CARTON
$1.75 Plus
Tax
TEK
TOOTH BRUSHES
2 for 51c
25c
PHILLIPS
TOOTH PASTE
2for3lc
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DUO-CREME
Lemonized Shampoo
98c

OLD SPICE
TOILET WATER & PERFUME

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LI T KIT COMPLETE $2.25
EmEREFILL $1.25
TONI KIT with SPIN CURLERS $2.29
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HUDNUT KITS $1.50
BOBBI $1.25

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EASTER SPECIALS
MILK CHOCOLATE COVERED
CHERRIES L B. BOX 49C
DE MET'S
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BOOKSCAD
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Kills Clothes Moths and Larvae..............Reg.59c lb.
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