100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

sL X QI xiTITHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA E THREE

Fl-II

Open House Decides

Campus

Titles

Tonight

aculty-Student Exhibitions
ighlight Sports Carnival

* *. * *

IlliniCagers
Whip Lions
In Tourney

Nine Gymnasts Awarded Varsity Letters

By JERRY BALBUS
Faculty-Student team competi-
on will be the feature activity
wring the 20th annual I-M Open
:ouse tonight, from 6:30 to 10 p.
., at the Intramural Sports Build-
ig, which will also crown 16 new
impus champions.
Competition in handball, paddle-
all, squash, tennis, volleyball and
!ater polo will give the students a
tance to match wits with the pro-
ssors on more even terms than
sual.
HIGHLIGHT of the evening's
ctivities will be the All-Campus
bampionship boxing bouts. In ad-
ition to -the five titles to be de-
ided, the oustanding boxer of the
ight will receive the Orwick-
;etomer trophy.
The line-up shows: Isaac
Akita vs. George Matsuda in the
featherweight division; Phil
Wyle vs. Richard Beardsley at
155 pounds; Ed Kettenstock vs.
Richard Reynolds in the 145
pound bout; Martin Feldman vs.
George Krassner at 118 pounds;
and Millard Seto vs. Nick Popiel
*for the 135; pound clash.
Seto is the only defending champ
td will be fighting the same man
:e closely decisioned last year.
ALTERNATED between each
istic match will be the All-Campus
restling tilts.
Other All-campus. matches
will take place in badminton,
Flayers May
hoose New
lase ball Czar
TAMPA, Fla.-(AP)Top drawer
fseball reaction ranged from cha-
rin to shocked silence yesterday
allowing the suggestion that ball
layers be given a voice in naming.
tiae new Commissioner.
Detroit Pitcher Freddie Hutchin-
an, official player-representative
f the Aierican League, threw the
ombshell into the seething Com-
iissioner squabble with the state-
lent yesterday that owners will be
etitioned in July to give the play-
rs a part in choosing a successor
A. B. Chandler.
IF THE OWNERS don't agree to
ais, Hutchinson warned in Lake-
tnd, Fla., then the players may go
ut and hire a man of their own--
laybe the deposed Happy Chand-
r, himself.
"Players feel we could pay a
Commissioner $40,000 a year to
represent us," the Tiger pitcher
added. "That would be an assess-
ment of $100 a player for the
400 major leaguers."

codeball, diving, fencing, paddle-
ball, and weight lifting.
Another top event, should be the
three divisional basketball cham-
pionship matches to be played for
the Professional Fraternity, Gen-
eral Fraternity, and Residence Hall
crowns. *
THE CAGE PROGRAM will list
Law Club, last year's professional
fraternity champs, against Alpha
Kappa Kappa while Phi Gamma
Delta faces Alpha Tau Omega for
the general fraternity title. In the
last game of the night, for dorm
basketball laurels, Fletcher Hall,
defending titleholders will meet
Chicago House.
The swimming pool will be the
scene of much activity through-
out the evening with competition
ranging from diving to water
polo.
Heading the program will be
the fraternity swimming champi-
onships. The mermen will toe the
mark in seven events and Sigma
Chi is being given the edge by
virtue of their qualifying men for
all but two races.
I-M OPEN HOUSE CALENDAR
BADMINTON: 8:30-10 p.m., Main
Gym. All-Campus Tournaments.
BASKETBALL: 6:30, p.m., Main
Gym. Championship Matches-Profes-
sional Fraternity (Law Club vs. Alpha
Kappa Kappa), General Fraternity
(Phi Gamma Delta vs. Alpha Tau
Omega), Residence Halls (Fletcher
Hall vs. Chicago House).' ;
BOXING: 7:45 p.m., Main Gym.
All-Campus Tournament bouts.
CODEBALL: 8:00 p.m., Main Gym.
All-Campus matches in Courts 13 and
14.
DIVING: 7:00 p.m., Swimming Pool.
All-Campus tournament and exhibi-
tion diving.
FENCING: 7:30 p.m., Boxing Room.
All-Campus Matches.
GYMNASTICS: 7:30 p.m., Auxiliary
Gym. Exhibition.
HANDBALL: 7:00 p.m., handball
Courts. Faculty-Student Matches be-
gin at 8 p.m.
PADDLEBALL: 7 p.m., Handball
Courts. Residence Hall matches. 8
p.m., Faculty-Student matches. 9
p.m., Fraternityssemifinals and All-
Campus matches.
SQUASH RACQUETS: 3 p.m.,
Squash Courts. Faculty-Student
matches.
SWIMMING: 8p.m., Swinming
Pool. Fraternity swimming chain-
pionships.
TENNIS: 7 p.m., Main Gym. Fac-
ulty-Student matches.
VOLLEYBALL: 7 p.m., Main Gym.
Residence Hall Champs (Adams
House) vs. Independent champs (Ha-
waiians). 9 p.m., General Fraternity
champs (Sigma Phi Epsilon) vs. Fac-
ulty runner-ups (Psychology). 9 p.m.,
Pro-fraternity champs (Phi Epsilon
Kappa) vs. Faculty champs (Educa-
tion Dept.)
WATER POLO: 9 p.m., Swimming
Pool. Williams House (Res. Hall
champs) vs. Flounders (Faculty
team).
WEIGHT LIFTING: 7:30 p.m., Main
Gym.sAll-Campus contests.
WRESTLING: 7 p.m., Main Gym.
All-Campus championships.

Nine members of the 1950-51
gymnastics squad which won twoj
matches while losing five over
the regular season were awarded
varsity M's by gym coach.Newt
Loken.
There were four reserve awards
given and five yearling gymnasts
earned freshman numerals.
THE TUMBLERS will compete

in the Western Conference meet
this weekend in Madison, Wiscon-
sin and will be host team to the
NCAA championships in Ann Ar-
bor, March 30-31.
The letter winners are Edsel
Buchanon, Con Ettl, Bob Check-
ley, Jeff Knight, John Mills,
Don Hurst, Fred Thompson,

Wally Niemann, and. Stickne
Davidson.
Mark Neville, Remus Boil*
Bob Wyllie, and lXonroe Row-
land received reserve awards.
Freshman awards were given
to Marvin Johnson, Lee Krumb-
holz, Dick Bergman, Duncan
Eiley, and Tom Mericle.

St.
NC

Johns, Kentucky,
State Also Win

IM MOGULS-Earl Riskey (sitting), Director of University Intra-
mural Athletics, and his assistant, Rod Granbeau, plan list of
events for tonight's big, all-campus open house to be held at the
IM Building.

Veteran Catching Staff Seen
Backbone of Michigan Nine.

By The Associated Press
Illinois splintered Columbia's
proud unbeaten record 79-71, on
the phenomenal long-range sharp-
shooting of substitute Ted Beach
last night and St. John's breezed
past Connecticut, 63-52, to gain
the semi-finalsof the NCAA East-
ern Basketball Tournament at
New York
The Big Ten Champions qual-
ified to meet North Carolina
State, 67-62 conqueror of Villa-
nova at Raleigh, N.C., in Thurs-
day's round of four at Maaison
Square Garden. St. John's will
play top-ranked Kentucky who
beat Louisville, 79-68, also at
Raleigh.
Although the Illinois-Columbia
game was not decided until the
final minutes before a roaring
Garden crowd of 17,107, it was
Beach., a Senior troubleshooter
who goes in when the Sophomores
fall, who broke the Lions' hearts
with a fantastic exhibition of set
shooting just before the end of
the half.
North Carolina State's Wolf-
pack, trailing 38-32 at halftime,
fought back behind the brilliant
shooting of forward Bill Kukoy
to upset Villanova, 67-62 in the
opener of the NCAA Southern
Basketball Quarterfinals.
In the second game, high scor-
ing Kentucky, battled to a virtual
standstill most of the game, pulled
away in the last eight minutes to
defeat a fired-up Louisville team,
79-68, 'before 12,400 fans.
Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

.... ,..,. S. ..,. ,. *a444 .".....:'r .w.... . ... r : °.:.h "tia{-;"7:d f C .4:.. -... -... . , .$4.. "

EASY LINES

FOR EASTER
AND AFTER

You'll want one of these superbly
tailored single breasted all-wool gab.
ardine suits; perfect for the Easter
and Spring season.

* HAND STITCHING
* PATCH POCKETS
* 2-BUTTON STYLING

By TED PAPES
(EDITOR'S NOTE--This is the first
in a series of four articles designed
to introduce the Michigan baseball
team to Daily readers.)
This is the time of the year
when every manager and coach in
baseball sings the blues.
Coach Ray Fisher of Michigan
was in excellent tune yesterday as
he watched his young recruits
ramble through another indoor
workout at their Yost Field House
training base.
ASK HIM ABOUT infield, out-
field and pitching possibilities and
he pessimistically replies, "I just
don't know what to expect." But
should the conversation shift to
the catching department his face
takes on a strange glow.
Fisher thinks he has the best
Giants Swamp
Tigers,_16-7
LAKELAND, Fla. -- (4P) -- The
New York Giants broke loose with
six runs in the eighth inning yes-
terday and went on to win an ex-
hibition game over the Detroit
Tigers, 16-7.
Rookie Catcher Rafael Nobel's
pinch home run tied the score at
7-7 and ignited the rally that won
for the Giants.
Johnny Groth hit a home run
for the Tigers in the fourth.
Pitcher Saul Rogovin, sidelined
since last July with a sore arm,
made his first start of the Spring.
He walked four straight batters to
give the Giants their first run
but aside from that lapse didn't
look too bad. He gave only three
hits in four innings.
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Kansas City (AA) 8, Philadelphia
(N) 5
Chicago (A) 5, New York (A) 0
St. Louis (A) 6. Cleveland (A) 5
Pittsburgh 'B' (N) 3, UCLA 1
Boston (N) 2, Boston (A) 1
Philadelphia (A) 12, Brooklyn
(N) I

backstop corps in the Western
Conference. He proudly points
to three men, any one of whom
could hold down a regular spot
on most teams in the league.
The trio is headed by senior
Pete Palmer who returns after an
excellent 1950 performance with
the Wolverines. He was his team's
second best hitter with a .340
mark in 12 Conference games.
He collected 17 hits in 50 times
at bat including a double and two
triples.
THEN COMES Line (for Lin-
oln) Painter who was placed on
the firing line during the south-
ern trip last year and was re-
tamned as a pinch hitter for the
rest of the campaign.
His ability with the willow
might earn him an outfield as-
signment this year since there
is such a wealth of catching
prospects;
Completing the top three is
personable Doug Peck, a junior
target from Rockford, Michigan.
He's a diligent worker with a po-
tential for development if he gets
the opportunity to show his stuff.
Peck played a few innings last
campaign, and so far Fisher is
pleased with his progress this
spring.
* * *
THERE'S no doubt that Palm-
er is the class of the field, how-
ever. Pitchers contend that the
chunky lad radiates confidence
toward the mound with his line of
chatter.
Handling of hurlers by a catcher
of Palmer's mettle often shows up
in the win-loss columns of the
league's standings. Fisher's fond-
est hope is that he'll have some
pitchers to handle.
With half the battery virtually
set for the season more attention
can be given to the other con-
jectural positions. Solutions to
those problems will be delayed un-
til the weather permits outdoor
drills. Next subject-the infield.

Grey, tan, brown, blue, navy and green.
Regulars and Longs.

$5500

Extra trousers at nominal cost

MEN'S TOGGERY
607 EAST LIBERTY - NEXT TO MICHIGAN THEATRE

.: r{:: " r}" M.f :{ T' " ::M.:t. E.r.. EMERIM r
.r:irr""i:.."I}r.:: ...J: i.f.:oi{ ;r°1 :,": r :%"::, y 4 . 'e. ah"i @i A~}~i ir;r.l'Y2"i6 4.le'rs#'F 'ri~ Yr'

k

For
MEN

BASS FOOTWEAR

For
WOMEN

GOOD FITTING SHOES mean more to your general health and happiness
than any other article you wear. The patented construction features em-
ployed by Bass in the manufacture of their product contribute more in
Comfort, Quality and Durability than any other shoes made. We invite
you to call and see our various styles and colors while the size runs are most
complete.

.f

The VAN HEUSEN

t

CENTURY SHIRT
in Whites and Colors

STATE
STREET

wigal
it e, r. f
.lNcx 1844,

AT
LIBERTY

now ... in colors,
Vai Heusen ayx- shirt
its soft collar
won't wrinkle...
ever!
fI
rI
.5 I
Now in blue, grey
and tan, $450
/r or in white,
, s ' $395,145
" h;;:. . F Wide-spread or
regular collars.I
You don't need a course in nuclear physics to unders'tand'
why this amazing collar just can't wrinkle. It's woven in

A. The "WEEJUN".
The finest loafer made. Comes
in brown, black, white & brown
and white. Leather or rubber
soles. $10.95 up

r

B. Scotch-Grain OXFORD.
Our most popular Men's style
-Comes in both leatier and
rubber sole. AA to E widths to
size 13. from $19.95

Racket Rfstringing

'.4 +
l:4/
i A

Vietor
Johnson strings
Junemnan

x6oo

t$1100

D. The ever popular "SMOKE ELK".

C. SADDLES (Boys and Girls)
Black & white, brown & white. Genuine
washable Elk with leather lined vamp and
tough red rubber sole. $11.50 and
$13.50

i

Nylon strings
t$404) 500

Ladies sizes to 10 - AAA to C widths
$11.50. Men's sizes to 13 - AA to E
widths $13.95. Still made with the non-
heating, long wearing natural colored
gristle sole.
VSrL... TWIa TJE eTVI rc : *- L ..L i . t I

Have Four Racket Restrung
- K7V &J w

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan