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March 20, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-20

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LY,..MAROR 20, 1951 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SWAGE

Tce

Champions

Honor

Celley,

Keyes

NCAA Cage Tourney Open

* *

* * *

Frosh Athletes
Get Go Signal
From Big Ten
Bowl Contract Near
Three Year Renewal
The Western Conference yester-
day voted to make freshmen
eligible for varsity sports beginning
September Ist for a one year per-
iod.
The move which followed action
of the Pacific Coast Conference,
was taken as Faculty Representa-
tives aid Athletic Directors closed
their two-day meeting in Chicago.
'Yesterday they voted to extendI
the Rose Bowl pact for three years,
subject to ratification by the ath-
letic governing groups of the Big
Ten Schools.
MICHIGAN will be able to go to
the Rose Bowl only once during the
term of the proposed extension of'
the pact with the Pacific Coast.
The Wolverines' 14-6 victory over
California in the Rose Bowl this
year marked the end of the orig-
inal five year agreement with the
PCC.
The new extei~ion contained
two alternate proposals, both of
which Big Ten schools will vote
on. One provides for retentiofi of
the old rule that a Conference
team can only visit the Rose
Bowl once in three years, while
the other shortens the span to
once in two years. Michigan's
Athletic Director, H. 0. (Fritz).
Crisler said he favored the old
one-in-three rule.
Either way, Michigan won't be
eligible for the Rose Bowl next
year. If the one-in-two plan is
passed they can play in EITHER
1953 or 1954. But if the three year
rule is kept, the Wolverines won't
be able to go to Pasadena until
1954.
Unless this proposal is given a
unanimous favorable vote by the
individual schools during the next
60 days, it will revert to the faculty
men and directors for another vote
at the May Conference meeting.
Only a simple majority will then be
needed.

Club Picks Neil as MVP;
Ear Elected to Captaincy

-J. M. Egbert, Broadmoor Hotel
ALL STARS-Pictured above is the Michigan-dominated AP NCAA all-tournament team. The
members are (left to right): Bob Heathcott, Jim Starrak (Colorado College), defense; Gil Bur-
ford, wing; Don Whiston (Brown), goal; John Matchefts, center; and Neil Celley, wing.
DIAMOND DOINGS:
Red Sox Shatter Giants' Victory Streak

By JIM PARKER
On the victorious return trip
from the NCAA hockey playoffs,
the 14 members of Michigan's na-
tional championship sextet elected
Neil Celley as their most valuable
player of the year and voted Earl
Keyes as next year's team captain.
For the Wolverines it was a
most deserved honor and a fitting
climax to one of M'ichigan's great-
est seasons of ice hockey.
"THE BIG GUN" of the highest
scoring hockey team in Maize and
Blue history, Celley poured
through three goals and two as-
sists in the playoffs to send his
season total to a phenomenal 79
points.
During the regular season the
senior left wing set Michigan's
individual scoring record with
74 points.
And Keyes, the most versatile
player on the squad, turned in
two of his finest performances of
the season at the Colorado
Springs tournament and regis-
tered one goal and three assists
to add to his 40 points (18 goals
and 22 assists) scored this year,
The 155 pound junior proved
his value to the team when he
left his second line center position
to play goal for the Wolverines
against Michigan Tech.
IN ADDITION to Ceuley, four
other -seniors-team captain Gil
Burford, Al Bassey, Joe Marmo
and Hal Downes-wound up their
Michigan hockey careers at Colo-
rado Springs.
Burford, Michigan's great
breakaway artist, centered the
tourney second in yegular sea-
son individual scoring with 66
points and scored one goal and
assisted his teammates on four
others to boost his scoring total
to 71 points.
Bassey and Marmo celebrated
their final tour of duty with the
Maize and Blue by both scoring
goals in Michigan's 8-2 victory
over Boston University and Bassey
came through with one more in
the tournament finale, the 7-1
triumph over Brown's Ivy League
champions for the national title.
* * *
FROM BEHIND a tremendous
Michigan defense, Downes, the
Michigan goal keeper who had
been a "Johnny on the spot" all
season long, allowed but three
shots get past him for a 1.5 goals
against average that is tops in the
four years of tournament play.

NEW YORK - (P) - The coun-
try's No. 1 college basketball team
and the only one not to suffer a
defeat this season will share co-E
featured roles tonight in the open-
ing round of the NCAA Eastern
eliminations.
Kentucky's mighty wildcats,
top-ranked in the Associated
Press' final poll, will open their
national title bid at Raleigh,
N.C., meeting a strong inde-
pendent state rival, Louisville.
Columbia's Lions, winners of 22
straight games this season and 31
over a two-year span, will risk
their perfect record at New York's
Madison Square Garden against
Illinois, formidable champion of
the Big Ten.
These two games will head-
line. opening skirmishes in a

The previous low was turned in
by Dartmouth's Dick Desmond in
1949 when he allowed six goals
scored- against him.
In the Associated Press all-
tournament teams Michigan
dominated the selections by
placing four men on the first
team, including its first line
intact with the naming of Cel-
ley, and Burford on the wings
and John Matchefts at center.
Defenseman Bob Heathcott was
the other first stringer.
It was the first time in the
tournament's history that one
team has placed four men on the
first team. Last year Boston Uni-
versity had three on the honor
squad.
The second goalie position was
awarded to Downes and honorable
mentions were given to forwards
John McKennell and Keyes and
to defensemen Alex McClellan
and Graham Cragg.
The 14 hockey letter winners are:
Al Bassey, Walpole, Mass.; Gil Bur-
ford, Windsor, Ont.; Neil Celley,
Eveleth, Minn.; Graham Cragg, Ed-
monton, Alberta; Hal Downes, Stone-
habrMass.; Bob Heathcott, Calgary,
Alberta; Earl Keyes, Tiverton, Ont.;
Joe Marmo, Boston, Mass.; John
Matchefts, Eveleth, Minn.; Ed May,
Edmonton, Alberta; Alex McClellan,
Montreal, Que.; John McKennell,
Toronto, Ont.; Gordon Naylor, Mon-
treal, Que.; and Marry Stuhldreher,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Raiders Win

SCHICK ELECTRIC SHAVER

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tournament that before the en
of the week will see a 16 tea
field-including all the baske
ball elite and champions of ti
major conferences--reducedt
two finalists.
The Western NCAA elimir
tions, with eight teams invol(
will open in Kansas City tom
row night with Oklahoma A.. :
M., the No. 2 nationally ranl
Missouri Valley, champions, a
Kansas State's Big Seven titli
as favorites.
H APPY EASTER
TO YOU!
Closed Friday 12 to 3 P.M.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

\'N

/

RED SOX 2, GIANTS 1
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.-(P)-
The Boston Red Sox snapped the
four-game winning streak of the
New York Giants by defeating Leo
Durocher's athletes, 2-1. in a
pitchers' battle yesterday.
The Red Sox made only two hits,
one apiece off Larry Jansen, who
worked the first five innings and
Sal Maglie, who finished up. They
pushed across single runs in the
seventh and eighth innings, the
first on two walks, a sacrifice and
a long fly, and the second on an
error by Bobby H'ofman.

DODGERS 5, A'S 1
VERO BEACH, FLA.-(P)-The
Brooklyn Dodgers returned "home"
to Dodgertown yesterday and re-
gained winning form in a 5-1 vic-
tory over the Philadelphia A's.
Joe Hatten allowed four hits
during the first five innings and.
Carl Erskine maintained the shut-
out until two out in the ninth when
Elmer Valo singled and Lou Lim-
mer tripled.
PHILS 8, CARDS 7
CLEARWATER, FLA.-(P)-A
hit batsman and two errors gave
the Philadelphia Phillies a run
without a hit in the 10th inning-
and an 8-7 victory over the St.
Louis Cardinals yesterday.
The Cards themselves scored
twice in the ninth with the help
of two errors to send the game
into extra innings.
The big blow of the Phils' 16-hit
attack was Mike Goliat's three-run
homer in the fifth. Don Richmond

homered for the Cards off Bubba
Church in the first inning and
Larry Miggins off Ken Heintzel-
man in the seventh.
REDS 14, BRAVES 2
TAMPA, FLA. - (AP) - Powerful
Ted Kluszewski teed off on the
Boston Braves' pitching yesterday
to lead his Cincinnati teammates
to a hit-happy 14-2 exhibition win.
The ruggedly constructed first
baseman banged out a pair of
king sized home runs and also
chipped in with a single and a
dauble as the Redlegs mauled Lefty
Warren Spahn and a trio of lower-
case Boston burlers for 18 assorted
hits.
BUCS 4, TRIBE 2
LOS ANGELES, CALIF.-()-
The Pittsburgh Pirates banged out
three home runs and got some
nifty pitching yesterday as they
defeated the American League's
Cleveland Indians 4-2 in an exhibi-
tion witnessed by 3,909.

I-M Cage

Title

PUSHO SHAVING!

Reed's Raiders earned the right
to wear the 1951 Independent
League basketball crown by'upset-
ting favored Newman Club, 44 to
40, in a thrilling overtime battle at
the Sports Building last night.
With the score knotted at 40
all at the end of regulation time,
Don Oldham and Rich Beison
scored on break-way efforts to
bring the Raiders victory in the
extra three minutes.
The two quintets battled on even
terms throughout the contest, the
score reading 21 to 20 in favor of
the Raiders at the half way mark.
Beison, Ted Topor and Dick
Strowzewski were the big guns in
the winner's attack, hitting for 14,
eight and eight respectively.
Forward Al Rotsko paced New-
man's futile attempt with 16 tal-
lies. Gridder Don Peterson counted
10 markers t earn runner's up hon-
ors.

More men want and use the
Schick Electric Shaver than any
other make. Here's why: The
Schick Super is the only electric
shaver with a STOP-START
SWITCH to give "push-button"
shaving. It has the most efficient
real motor of any shaver. Its V-16
shaving heads can quickly handle
any beard. And the "Whisk-Its"
that catch the beard clippings are
conveniently hinged for easy
emptying.

MUST OUTSHAVE
BLADE RAZORS
or your money back
If after ten days' trial your
man isn't convinced that the
Schick can *otshave his
blade razorreturn it and
get your money back.
schick Colonel 17.50

Make
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for
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