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March 06, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-06

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PAGE THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1951

i

Noted Lecturer Brown
Will Speak Tomorrow
John Mason Brown, critic, au- participating in the Sicilian and
thor and lecturer who will speak Normandy invasions.
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Out of his war experiences
Auditorium, is another one of the came two books "To All Hands"
many people whose lives were and "Many a Watchful Night."
radically changed by the war. When he got out of the service
For nearly twenty yars, from his viewpoint had changed.
1924 to 1942 Brown served as dra- Instead of again becoming aI
matic critic for a number of New dramatic critic for a newspaper,
York publications-Theatre Arts he was made an associate editor
Monthly, the Evening Post and of the Saturday Review of Litera-
the World-Telegram. ture, to which he started contri-
IN 1942 HE entered the service buting a weekly column, "Seeing
as a lieutenant in the Navy. Things," a job he's been perform-
Brown served for two years on ing ever since.
the staff of Admiral Alan G. Kirk, The column does deal mainly
with theatrical matters, the field
in which Brown is most expert,
Expert Calls but such subjects as the growing
1 pains of the author's children
T have also crept in frequently.
Bona Issuance hseee r-
Limited Move BEFORE THE WAR, Brown
has explained, he was "stage-
struck" but- since the war he has
The issuance of the new Trea- been "life-struck." "The theatre
sury bond, done in an attempt to still interests me, he has written,
settle the rift between the Trea- but now I endeavor, even when
sury and the Federal Reserve, was writing about the theatre, to re-
called a "limited move in the late it to something more, to con-
right direction" yesterday by Prof. nect the make-believe with the
Paul McCracken of the business real, the particular with the gen-
administration school. eral."
The new issue, which was an- Tickets for the Brown lecture,
nounced Saturday, is to be of the which will be presented under the
long term, non-marketable type- auspices of University Oratorical
It will bear more interest than Association, will go on sale at 10
the old type. a.m. today in the Hill Auditorium
box-office. They are priced at
BECAUSE THE NEW bond will $1.50, $1.20 and 60 cents.
be exchangeable for short term, The auditorium box office will
marketable securities, Prof. Mc- be open from 10 a.m. to o.m
Cracken felt that it will not ef- and from 2 p m. to 5 p1m today.
fectively solve the problem of p t 5 p
monetization of the public debt.
"In fact," he added, "if the Fed- Concert Seies
eral Reserve Board refuses to
support these short term bonds, Will End Today
the controversy may break out
anew." The third and final concert in
He also felt that because the the all - Beethoven series per-
maturity date of the new bond formed b, Prof. Emeritus Mabel
has. not yet been announced, not Rhead Fiold and Prof Gilbert
too much can be predicted about Ross will be presented at 8:30
the success of the added interest. p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
"The chief significance of the Hall.
move is that it shows that the The concert program includes:
long term interest rate can be "Sonata in F major, Op. 24; "So-
changed when conditions change. nata in A major, Op. 12"; and
We now have a long term issue "Sonata -in A major, Op. 47."
which has broken the former two The concert will be open to the
and one-half per cent ceiling." general public without charge.
WITH '12TH RUBBING
COVERS SCUFF MARKS! GIVES SHOES
RICHER COLOR! Black, Tan, Brown,
Dark Tan, Mid-Tan,
Blue, Oxblood,
4M'9'1 7L -Mahogany,
and Neutral
(KEE.WEE)
SHOE POUSI

375 Pledge Fraternities
As Spring Rushing Ends

'1

r

t°
N.

EVERYTHING

-Daily-Roger Reinke
PETALS GOING DOWN-Joan Heiderer, '53, a member of the
stage crew for "The Magic Flute," shows how the petals of a
flower prop in the opera will unfold to reveal one of the characters.
* * * *
Intricacies of Set Production
To Put Magic in 'Mgc Flute'

Mysterious, magical things will
be happening on the stage of the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre at the
end of this week and the begin-
ning of next.
Thirty-two
Earn All A's
Thirty-two engineering students
received all A's last semester.
They are:
Russell Ash, John Baker, '51;
John Biary, '51; Willard Black-
ney; Charles Bliven, '51; Tsung-
Hsien Cheng, '51; George David-
son, '53; Daniel Dow, '52; Theo-
dore Feenstra, '52; Robert Frese,
'51; Edward Gilbert, '52; Elmer
Gilbert; Jack Gillette, '52; Irving
Gold, '51, anl James Hamburg,
'53.
Dale Haskin, '52; Barry Hen-
ning, '53; Emil Jansen, '51; Jack
Jennings, '52; Loren Johnston,
'54; Dean MacGregor, '51; John
Merow, '52; Herman Merte, '51;
Harry Mosher; Warren Norquist,
'53; James Nyberg, '51; Edwin
Piersma, '51; Richard Reimus,
'53; James Shaner, '53; Kenneth
Sivier, '51; Donald Tackett, '53,
and Gerald White, '51.
Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

A flower will unfold its petals,
a mountain will split open and a
90 foot dragon will fly.
THESE phenomena will be a
part of the Department of Speech-
Music School's production of Mo-
zart's opera "The Magic Flute,"
which will be occupying the Men-
delssohn stage for a five perform-
ance span starting Thursday.
The person who solved the
technical problems involved in
getting a flower to unfold or a
dragon to fly was George Cre-
peau, Grad., who has designed
the sets for the production.
A n d, Crepeau indicated, it
was no easy job. "Luckily," he
said, "the show, because of its
fairy-tale quality, doesn't need to
be done realistically."
* * *
FOR AN example Crepeau told
how the unfolding petals'had been
managed. The flower is white
specked ,with magenta, made of
wood cut in the shape of a flow-
er and mounted on rollers.
When the scene in which the
flower is to be used comes, the
cart is rolled on stage when all
the lights are down. Crouched
down inside is the character
who is supposed to emerge when
the petals unfold.
On cue, the character in the
cart will rise, let down three pe-
tal-shaped pieces of wood in the
front of the contraption and make
her appearance.
But how would they manage
to get a 90 foot dragon on the
stage?
"Well we won't exactly get it
on the stage," Crepeau explained
"We're going to stick just the first
ten feet of the dragon on from
one side. The other 80 feet we'l
leave up to the audience's imagi-
nation."
But Crepeau wouldn't give an
explanation of how the mountain
opening would be managed. "Aft.
er all," he said "we don't want
the audience to know everything.'
Meeting Postponed
The WSSF speakers' meeting
previously scheduled for today har
been postponed until Friday.

(Continued from Page 2)
Hurley, '53Ed; Douglas G. Miko-
lasek, '52; Lester R. Nelson, '54;
Robert D. Pine, '53; Steven M.
Postol, '52; Russell G. Rescorla,
'53; J. William Streidl, '52NR,
and Russell L. Whitfield, '52BAd.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Charles J.
Clark, Jr., '53E; Ernest Constan,
'53E; Thomas E. Kriewall, '53E;
Roy Nowak, '54; Carl D. Pursell,
'55; Cal Samra, '53, and Frank C.
Starbuck, '54E.
PHI SIGMA DELTA: Eli Berger,
'54; Martin W. Gruenfeld, '55E;
Gerald Kess, '55P; David Klein,
'53; Howard Robinson, '54; Rich-
ard L. Spero, '54; Larry R. Trager,
'54, and David L. Wulfsohn, '54.
PHI SIGMA KAPPA: Ducan
Osborne, '53; William H. Powell,
'52; Stephen J. Stolton, '52E;
David A. Wild, '54, and Robert
J. Wilson, '52.
PI LAMBDA PHI: Sherwin Bal-
lis, '55; Melvin A. Blum, '54; Rich-
ard Conn, '53; Stuart R. Gilden,
'54; David Goldstick, '54; Paul W.
Greenberg, '54; Donald A. Kahan,
'55; William Kaufman, '54; Ivan
N. Kaye, '54; George B. Levy, '52;
Richard S. Nelson, '53; Byron
Sparber, '54; James Survis, '54;
Bruce Wayne, '53, and Stephen E.
Weekstein, '54.
PSI UPSILON: Sherman An-
drews, '53; Richard D. Feather-
stone, '54; Carl Heller, '54A, and
Michael F. Johnson, '54.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON:
Anthony Georgilas, '52; Robert
F. Lawson, '53; Donald E. Lieb-
reich,'53E; Emil F. Morlock, '53;
John W. Nagle, '52; Richard L.
Redmond, '53; Donald D. Rahrig,
'53E; Roger W. Reinke, '53E;
Alfred E. Shultz, '54; John M.
Taylor, '54; William A. Trucken-
brod, 154E; Charles S. Waggoner
II, '53; Bruce Bartholomew, '53;
Christian L. Brix, '54; Merritt W.
Green II, '53, and Richard. J.
Strozewski, '53.
SIGMA ALPHA MU: Daniel
Fogel, '54; Richard Lewis, '53;
Stuart Orman, '54;rArthur Rosen-
baum, '54; Irving Tobocman, '54A,
and MurrayYolles '54.
SIGMA CHI: James Balog, '53;
Richard Balzhiser, '54E; Peter
Birchfield, '54; Norman Canty,
'54; Constantine Cavalarie, '54;
H. Thomas Erbland, '54; Harmon
Grubbs, '53E; Cass Hough, Jr., -'54;
Willard Ikola, '54Ed; Gerald Lu-
ther, '54A; Eugene Knutson, '54;
Alex McClellan, '53, and James
Young, '54.
SIGMA NU: David L. Ayers,
'54E; Willard C. Blackney, '54E;
Edgar R. Fergusoh, '55E;
Charles D. Gilbert, '54; Eugene
D: Hamaker, '54; Gary K. Hobbs,
'54; Eugene Kozlovich, '52BAd;
Lawrence V. Moore, '54E; Leon-
ard G. Miller, '54E; William J.
Stansell, '54; William I. Stem-
well, Jr., '54E; John R. Stitt,
'53E, and Peter K. Wendel, '54E.
t SIGMA PHI: Richard B. Arne-
. sen, '54SM; Peter Bagrow, '54;
t John P. Boyce II, '54, and James N.
MacMillan, '54E.
1 SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Bruce C.
- Bemis, '54; Stanley C. Burns, '54;
Sydney P. Cook, '54; Robert F.
Cutting, '53E; David M. Davidsen,
'54; John R. Dunn, '54; John F.
. Elert, '53; Robert S. Fremlin, '53E;
t Duane W. Fuller, '52BAd; Gerald
L. Kuisel,,'52E; Roger E. Maugh,
'54E; Robert A. Peck, '54; James
A. Schaefer, '54E; Roland Schu-
ster, '53; Frank J. Spicciati, '54;
Charles J. Stauffer, '53SM; John
Vennerholm, '54E; Frederick M.
s Waltz, '54E; Byron L. West, '54,
and Theodore E. Workman, '54SM.

TAU DELTA PHI: Allen M.
Abrams, '54; Gerald S. Cohn,
'54E; Nat L. Fishman, '54; Mar-
tin Guior,'52; Marshall Hershon,
'53; Samuel Siporin, '54; Jerome
S. Sokol, '55, and Edwin J.
Smith, '55.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON: George
R. Dalton, '54E; Dyrck J. Dewitt,
'54E; N. H. Hing, '52; James W.
Lyle, '53E; Albert T. Miyama, '53;
Henry J. Moravec, '54E; Robert
D. Pehlke, '54E; Armin C. Tufer,
'53; Albert J. VanKampen, '53E,
and Grantland P. Rice, '52.
THETA CHI: William J. Barton,
'54; Arnold Buzzard, '54E; James
V. Castelli, '53E; Phil M. Comer-
ford, '52BAd; Robert I. Nielsen,
'52E; James A. Prior, '52; Jerry H.
Stonkoff, '53A, and David L. Wil-
liams, '55.
THETA DELTA CHI: Roy W.
Bloch, '52A; Herbert Boothroyd,
'52; Ernest W. Dyer, '54; Rich-
ard S. Hawley, '52; Roland John-
son, '54; John R. Price, Jr., '53,
and William C. Williams, '54.
THETA XI: Donald A. Ander-
son, '53; David W. Arnold, '54E;
Bruce H. Bacon, '54; Ronald R.
Barnett, '54; Bruce B. Bjorsett, '54;
William R. Patterson, '53P; Jack
E. Reynolds, '54; Donald S.
Schmitz, '54; Jack M. Snyder, '53;
Donald D. White, '53E, and Fred E.
Wiedle.
TRIANGLE: Richard L. Curtis,
,52E; Robert M. Johnson, '53E;
Robert L. Kersten, '53E; Richard
A. Pereles, '53E; James L. Roof,
'54E, and Henry J. Scaperoth,
'53E.
TRIGON: Ivan P. Lambert,
'53; Thomas C. McGirr, '54, and
James A. Sellgren, '54.
ZETA BETA TAU: Samuel
Dodek, '55; Stanford Gelbman, '54;
Marvin Gordon, '54; Fred Horo-
witz, '54; Fred Kapetansky, '54;
Richard Katz, '54; Harold Katz-
man, '54; Daniel Schechter, '54,
and Thomas Treeger, '54.
ZETA PSI: Frederick J. Allen,
'53; Jim R. Buck, '53; John Cush-
irig, Jr., '54; Peder Field, '54; Wil-
liam W. Hinshaw III, '54; Richard
A. Jones,1'53; Gordon Lindland,

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Number 13...THE OCELOT

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, ,,ngler Hll
DePaul University00'K
Chicago, Illinois
In Chicago, Illinois, there is

likes to be shown! She saw right through those thin, quick-trick, cigarette
tests and realized you couldn't fairly judge a cigarette's mildness with a
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which simply asks you to try Camels as your steady
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always

a friendly gathering of DePaul
University students in Wangler
Hall on the campus. And, as in

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