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October 04, 1950 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-04

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W'I SAY, O'lREf ,19"l

Health Talks
Completed;
Test Today
A sizable segment of the Univer-
sity's present population, approxi-
mately 1,125 Freshmen and others
who have not passed in the re-
quired hygiene course, are having
the way to healthy citizenship
pointed out by Dr. Warren E. For-
sythe, director of the University
Health Service, in a series of six
lectures which were concluded
last night in Natural Science audi-
torium.
Today Doctor Forsythe will ex-
amine these students on their
background information as well as
their newly acquired knowledge.
Last year 180 students failed in
the course which must be passed
before graduation.
Examinations will be held at
4, 5 and 7:30 p.m. in alphabeti-
cal groupings in Natural Science
auditorium and Rooms 25 and
1025 in Angell Hall.
CARELESS HABITS

Senior Photo-Feed

Doctor Forsythe has covered
significant advances in the fields
of medical research, public health
and preventive medicine. Practical
hints to health and safety were
given in the hope that the stu-
dent's skills, understandings and
behavior in his university life will
preserve a sound mind in a sound
body.
The University's "family doctor"
challenged careless social habits,
the use of home remedies and
false modesty about the facts of
life. What this means is that the
student is made alert to the dan-
gers which result in the social
diseases and their crippling ef-
fects.

ENSIAN CHOW CALL-Three seniors enjoy candy furnished by
the Michiganensian while they wait to have their senior pictures
taken at the 'Ensian office. Left to right they are Don Goldfarb,
'51; Isadore Million, '51 and Abdul Menam Aziz, '51. Jo Arm-
bruster is the young lady with the candy. Seniors and graduate
students may still make appointments for pictures for the 1951
year book, according to Clarence Kettler, '51, 'Ensian business
manager.
Duncan Hines, Famned
Eater,_Visits Ann Arbor

4

He emphasized the need for
seeking out the physician early
to prevent undue anxiety and
physical suffering.
Doctor Forsythe pointed out
that the University is one of the
few schools to give its entering
Freshmen such a highly concen-
trated course in practical aspects
of healthful living.

By ROBERT J. BAILYN
Daily Special Writer
Among most who appreciate a
restaurant serving the finest in
food there is one man whose pal-
ate is the final judgment, Duncan
Hines.
The famed gourmet and author
of "Adventures in' Good Eating"
visited Ann Arbor Monday after-
noon to inaugurate the manufac-
ture and sale in this area of a new
ice-cream.
Throughout the country some
600 friends. whose taste Hines
trusts { keep constant check on
restaurants. These people report
to him, and he revises his book
regularly every six months.
- - :1

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to al
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President Room 2552
Administration Building, 6y 3:00 p.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1950
VOL. LXI, No. 8
Notices
Regents' Meeting: Sat., Oct. 21,
9 a.m. Communications for consid-
eration at this meeting must be in
the President's hands not later
than Oct. 12.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Attention Faculty Members with
Academic-Year (10-month) Ap-
pointments:
Effective with the 1950-1951
Academic year, salary payments
for faculty members with Aca-
demic-year appointments will be
made on the basis of one-tenth of
annual salary on October 5, with
an additional one-tenth on the
fifth day of each succeeding month
to and including June 5, 1951,
with payment of final one-tenth
of salary on June 15, 1951.
Sunday Library Service: During
the Fall and Spring terms, except
during the holiday periods, the
Main Reading Room and Periodi-
cal Room of the General Library

will be kept open from 2 p.m. to
9 p.m.
Books from other parts of the
building which are needed for
Sunday use will be made available
in the Main Reading Room f re-
quests are made on Saturday of
an assistant in the reading room
where the books are usually shelv-
ed.
University Directory changes can-
not be accepted after Fri., Oct.
6.
Council for International Living
announces three vacancies in the
. Raleigh Nelson House for In-
ternational Living. Any foreign
or American student interested
may obtain further information by
calling 3-8506, or by calling at the
house, 915 Oakland.
Art Print Library: Today is the
last day for students to pick up
their prints at 510 Administration
without the chance of losing their
print to someone else and forfeit-
ing their rental fees, 8-12, 2-5.
Applications for Grants in Sup-
port of Research Projects: Faculty
members, who wish to apply for
grants from the Research Funds
to support research projects dur-
ing the current academic year,
should file their applications in
the Office of the Graduate School
(continued on Page 3)

Actually, the sale proceeds from
"Adventures in Good Eating" no
longer go to Hines. In line with
his philosophy of good health and
plenty of friends, all the book's
royalties have been permanently
donated to Cornell University,
Michigan State College, and the!
National Sanitation Foundationl
of the University of Michigan.
200 PER CENTER
-- "A restaurant has got to be a
200 per center," Hines declared,
to meet his rigid standards. A place
has first got to be 100 per cent
sanitary. The second 100 per cent
is divided evenly between the qual-
ity of the food, and service and
atmosphere.
Hines' friends are not paid for
their eating. And the restaurants,
he said, do not pay him for the
use of his name. But that name
has become the backbone of a cor-
poration which now produces and
sells some 100 quality products
from pork and beans to salad
dressing.
Hines, who appears to thrive
well on his taste, said he was in-
terested in good food since early
childhood. But it was in Chicago,
while working in, the advertising,
and printing field, that he began
to look for pleasing places to eat.
CHRISTMAS CARDS
He kept a list of these, and other
places he had found while travel-
ling on business. Finally, in 1935
he sent a copy of the list to his
friends instead of Christmas
cards. He said the demand for the
list was so great that he had to
start charging. Then no one want-
ed it.
But the editor of the Saturday
Evening Post heard of the list and
invited Hines to write an article.
That started things. Today, a
Duncan Hines sign in the window
of a restaurant is one of the most
widely recognized guarantees of
excellence.
'U' Educators
T~uo Aid M.E.A.
Thirteen members of the Uni-
versity School of Education facul-
ty will participate in programs of
the eight regional conferences of
the Michigan Education Associa-
tion which will be held this month
in Ann Arbor.
They will appear in a total of
19 meetings, serving as speakers,
section leaders, consultants, and
members of discussion panels.
Those taking part in the pro-
gram will be Profs. W. R. Dixon,
Phillip S. Jones, Williar G. Mer-
hab, Fred G. Walcott, G. M. Win-
go, and Ralph C. Wenrich; Uni-
versity elementary school teachers
Charlotte Hardy, Myra J. Muste,
and Laura M. Williams; Stewart
C. Huslander, lecturer, Marie Sko-
dak, extension teacher; Principal
John M. Trytten of the University
High School, and Lawrence Vre-
devoe, director of the bureau of
school. services.

Drop Rules
Differ For
'U'Schools
Lit, Grad Change
Deadline Nears
Students who are thinking of
changing or dropping their courses
may or may not have a hard time
doing it.
They might have to decide
quickly In order to beat a dead-
line, or their shift may be legal
until the end of the semester.
It all depends on what school
they're in.
Students in the literary college,
for instance, can add courses only
through this week. This is done by
filing a change of election card
with the Registrar, signed by the
student's advisor.
Literary college officials wanted
it made very clear that the ad-
visor's job is not to bar astudent
from making a change, but only
to make sure that the student
makes a "judicious" choice in re-
gard to his overall course.
Literary college courses may'be
dropped, however, through the
first three weeks. After that, ex-
cept in extraordinary circum-
stances, courses dropped will be
recorded as E.;
ENGINEERING COURSES
In contrast with the lit school's
limit of three weeks, students in
engineering school can, with their
classifier's and instructor's per-
mission, drop courses during the
first eight weeks.
Engineers can add courses, again
with the permission of their clasi-
fier and instructor, all the way
through the semester.
Graduate students can add and
drop courses only through this
week by filing the change of elec-
tion card with the Registrar.
Graduate courses dropped after
Friday will be recorded as "dr's"
or drops.
Covering the other schools
quickly, it was found: Bus Ad stu-
dents can add for the first two
weeks and drop for the first three
weeks; there is no time limit for
adding or dropping for students
in the School of Natural Re-
sources.
HAVE UNTIL MID-SEMESTER
Music School students may drop
until midsemesters without re-
ceiving an E, but may add only
this week. Students in the School
of Education also may- add* only
through this week. Education up-
perclassmen can drop for the first
six weeks; freshmen have that
privilege until the middle of the
semester.
In the School of Public Health,
adds Iimay be made only through
this week, drops through next
weeks. Law School students may
add or drop through this week
without any questions being asked.
After that all requests for changes
must be made in a petition to the
Administration Committee.
ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
Students in the College of Arch-
itecture and Design may add
through this week and drop
through the first eight weeks of
the semester.
In the College of Pharmacy adds
may be made through this week
with the permission of the stu-
dent's advisor. There is no time
limit on drops but this can only
be done with the permission of
the student's advisor and the col-
lege's dean.
Students in the medical, dental

and nursing schools don't heed to
worry about adds and drops. Their
courses are completely laid out
for them. They take what they're
told.
Poehle Appointed
Herbert F. Poehle, former re-
search coordinator at the Univer-
sity Engineering Research Insti-
tute, has been appointed assistant
to the director of the Institute.
The appointment was announc-
ed yesterday by Prof. A. E. White,
Institute director.
Art Print Library
Students who signed for prints
from the Art Print Library should
pick them up from 8 a.m. to noon
and from 2 to 5 p.m. today in 510
Administration Building, accord-
ing to Vivian Perlis, director.

BUSINESS SERVICES
Heard across the dinner table:
Why worry about the flies, they don't
eat much . .. Senior & Grad picturse
won't eat much of a hole in your
wallet either, so make your appoint-
ment while there are a few appoint-
ments open. Come in person or phone
the Publications Building daily 1-5
p m. MICHIGANENSIAN.
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist at
308 S. State. Legal Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-9848 or 2-1
4228. )12B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
Morrill's-314 S. State St. )4B3
LEAVE JUNIOR with areliable baby
sitter while you go out anytime.
Kiddie Kare,_3-1121.-a) loB
TIME & LIFE at special reduced Stu-
dent Rates. You need only be a stu-
dent to qualify. Your chance to get
something for that tuition you paid
last week. Phone 2-82-42 to order.
Student Periodical Agency. )2
HOOVER sales and service. Phone Tay-
lor, 2-0298 or Goodyears 3-4171. ) 19B
QUJALITY TYPING-Manuscripts, theses
etc. Call 2-0795 or 2-7460. )17B
FOR RENT
TWO EXCELLENT patron seats for the
Helen Traubel and Boston Symphony
Concerts, Oct. 22. Write Box 301, Mich.
Daily. ___-)-15F
2 ROOM SUITE for three. Also single.
Call 8746 after 5:30. )13F
SINGLE ROOM for male student.917
_E. Huron. __ )27R
ROOM IN Publications Building for
Grad and Senior pictures.Rent is
only $2.00 so hurry, since there are
only a few choice places left. Call:
9-12 A.M., 2-5 P.M. MICHIGANEN-
SIAN. _)14F
HELP WANTED
GIRLS NEEDED to baby sit during foot-
ball games. Call Kiddie Kare, 3-1121.
) lOB
SECRETARY WHO CAN ALSO ORGAN-
IZE STUDENT ACTIVITIES. Pull time
for Jewish student. Religious organi-
zation. Call 3-4129 for interview._)22H
GIRLS NEEDED to baby sit during foot-
ball games. Cali Kiddie Kare. 3-1121.
A BRIGHT, FRIENDLY engineering stu-
dent made over $5 an hour selling the
;student rates on TIME & LIFE last
year. He had no sales experience. If
yu would like to do the same, call
2-82-42 right now so that you can get
busy at once. Student Periodical
Agency. __j2
SALES~HELPWANTED-T6 solicit for
advertisements. Good pay. Ron Smith,
412 Mich. Hse. West Quad. Ph. 2-4401.
- - _ _ )26H
WANTED-Student to wait table in fra-
ternity house on occasion. Call Bill
Plumb at 2-2657 between 5 :30and 7:00.
)25H
WANTED-Amiious student with car
and some sales experience, to cover
calls by appointments. Above average
pay. For details and interview contact
Bruce McKay, 2933 W. 6th Mi. Rd.,
Detroit, or call UN 4-600. )24H
Read and Use

HELP WANTED
EXPERIENCED STORE CLERK for
men's shoes and furmings. Part time.
Good pay. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-.
ington. ___)_5
GIRL WANTED-To live in weekends to
help with light housework and care,
of children. Call 2-7104. )23H
TYPISTS NEEDED soon. Speed import-
ant. Use own typewriter. Call Don
Anderson, Student Periodical Agency.
I2-82-42. )lH
CO-ED OR student wife to assist
mother with it. housework an two
hours between 8 & 12 aam. Ph. 3-8454.
)lH
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED DRIVER - To Washington,
D.C. Friday or Saturday. Expenses
paid. )15T
FOR SALE_
TWO COMPLETE GOLF OUTFITS -
TOCMLT GOFOTISUsed, in good condition, including
some special model clubs. Reasonable.
Phone 2-4055. )37
ALL COLOR PARAKEETS, canaries,
finches, cocketiels. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. th, Ph. 5330. )2B
CUSHMAN MOTOR SCOOTER-Excel-
lent condition. Gear shift. Many ex-
tras, $150. Call 2-2706 between 5 and
7 p.m. )3
CONN TENOR SAXOPHONE-Used one
year. Like new. Very reasonable. 314
Catherine, upstairs. )35
HEADQUARTERS FOR LEVIS - SAM'S
STORE-Levis-3.55, your best buy for
work or play. The original cowboy
dungarees. We have Levis for boys,
men and ladies-also Levi jackets.
122 E. Washington.)5
A.K.C. REGISTERED COLLIE - Sable
and white. female, 10 mo. old. Para-
keets and canaries, 562 S. 7th street at
West Madison. _ _ ___-)2B
MEN'S BALLOON TIRE BIKE-Gall Bill
Wisner 2-7119. )34
TAILS-Tailor made. 39 long and acces-
sories. Also dark blue dress suit. Very
reasonable. Ph. 8618. _ __ )33
FOR SALE-1930 Chevrolet Coupe, good
condition, radio and heater. Call Don
_Edge, 2-4481. )30
NEW DRAWING SET and slide rule,
reasonable. A Bridgman, 1022 Forest.
)31
GET-TO-A-PHONE now to order your
Student Rate subscription to TIME or
LIFE. Rates available for eight months
eor full year. Dial 2-82-42, Student
Periodical Agency. ) 2
1947 M-ODEL REMINrGTON noiseless
portable typewriter; in good condi-
tion, $50. Call 2-2602 after 5 p.m. )29
MO0TORCYCLE-i 948 Indian 74_ Chief
with all extras. Phone 8976. )27
Starts Friday
WILL
ROGERS

LLOYD BRIDGES
P"ROCKET
SHIP
xM"l

Always
TWO
H ITS !

ROBERT ALDA
hi
"Hollywood
Varieties

FOR SALE
STUDEBAKER BARGAIN-1949 motor,
low mileage, exceptionally clean '39
chassis. Radio, heater, overdrive, hill-
holder, excellent rubber, relined
brakes. Must sell immediately. Ph.
,2-4336. )32
fOUSEiOLD FURNISHINGS - Daven-
port, tables, chairs, desks, bookcases,
lamps, baby furniture, easy spindrier,
auto. Ph. 2-4336. ___)32
'49 CROSLEY, 2 door sedan.~Excellent
condition. 35 MPH. Ph. 2-721 or 2-
8015. )28
ROOMS FOR RENT
3RD FLOOR STUDIO NEAR CAMPUS-
Prefer two to four art or arch.
men students. Linens, use of dark
room. Student landlord. Ph. 2-8545,
6-7. )23R
CARETAKER WANTED across from
Rackhain, one room apt. with private
bath, for student planning to be here
2 or 3 years summer and winter, in
exchange for services. Automatic gas
heat. Ph. Stewart at 8744 or Atkins
at 25-8882. ___)26R
SUITE TO SHARE with male student.
Twin beds. 304 E. Madison. T. )17A
3a~ DOUBLE for upper classman near
campus. Innerspring mattress, show-
ers, cooking privileges, gas heat. 415
Lawrence shown from 603 Lawrence.
Ph. 2-3673 or Ypsilanti 794J. )11R
ROOMS for rent one block from
campus. Clean house and shower
bath, Very comfortable. Tel. 8894. )22R
ATTRACTIVE STUDENT ROOMS-Cor-
ner of Hill and Washtenaw. $6.00 a
week, furnished. Call 2-6824. )28R
TOURIST HOME for Overnight Guests.
Bath, Shower. Reasonable Rates. 518
E. Williams St. Phone 3-8454. )12R

NO. MAIN-OPP. COURTHOUSE

[ICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

mmlw

ll NI____________

Today!
Sensational Broadway
Comedy Hit Now In

C41~I h

*A

Alec
in 7

V

i I

WANTED-hio State tickets. Phone
3-4187. )14XJ
TODAY
MAT. 30c NIGHTS & SUN. 44c

Daily Classifieds

4th Month of Rut

n

Guiness
Roles

LOST AND FOUND
$5 REWARD plus cash in wallet for
return of dark brown wallet and con-
tents. Lost in Ann Arbor cr vicinit.
Call Richard Hobert, 2-5553. )10
PERSONAL
LEARN TO DANCU1
Ray Hatch Dance Studio
Class or Private Lessons
209 S. State-Phone A.A. 5083 )4P
CLUB 211
TO ALL CLUB 211 MEMBERS---Your
ticket expires only when completely
punched. Need not be ud on con-
secutive days. Good an 'time. Take
advantage of this for deliblo'us meals.
A 20c MAGAZINE FOR LESS THAN 10c?
It's yours when you order TIME or
LIFE at the Student Epates. Phone
2-82-42 to order-we'll bl you. Stu-
dent Periodical Agency. Office: 705
National Bldg. )2
ATTENTION-Seniors and Grads: Hurry
to the Student Publications Building
to make your appointnient for your
yearbook picture. Appointment time
is growing shorter each day. Call 2-3241
and make your appointment by phone
if you have not the time to come in
person. Please call between 1 & 5 .m.
LAWERS
Vote Wednesday for PHIL MEENGS
for Junior Member of Board of Gov-
ernors. )1P
A ~ WANTED,

F--,

I

I

'1

Make a date
Swith Beauty.. .
To look smart this semester
Get a head start on beauty,
Call today
for an appointment.
Stact/er £.?a4 Sh0
601 EAST LIBERTY

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111

Headquarters for
ESTERBROOK
Fountain Pens

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IMPORTED
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