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October 01, 1950 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1950-10-01

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V

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAT, OCTOBER 1, 1950

Phoenix Gets
Praise fromg
AECOfficial
Placing the responsibility for
developing the peaceful and con-
structive aspects of atomic energy
squarely on non-government en-
'terprises such as the University's
Phoenix Project, Morse Salisbury,
information officer of the Atomic
Energy Commission addressed the
100th Annual Opening Exercises
of the Medical School yesterday.
At the present time, Salisbury
revealed, the government is work-
ing on further development of
atomic energy as a military wea-
pon.
* * *.
In his speech Salisbury reviewed
the entire development of the
AEC since its inception following
the success of jthe secret Manhat-
tan Project.
He cited the role of modern
medical science in , preventing
radiation injuries during the de-
velopment of the program.
It was through such preventa-
tive measures and the worker's
confidence that they succeeded in
attaining the high average of only
five radiation injuries since the
program's inception, he added.
Besides marking the official
opening of -the Medical School's
100th year, the convocation served
as the final meeting of the Medi-
cal Alumni Conference which has
been meeting in Ann Arbor since
Thursday.
Salisbury was introduced to the
convocation by President Ruthven.
Following Salisbury's address, re-
marks to the students on behalf
of the faculty were presented by
Dean Furstenberg of the Medical
School.

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Discrimination, Loyalty
Oaths Hound Campuses

ATOM DAY SPEAKER-Gordon Dean, chief of the Atomic Energy
Commission, will speak at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Auditorium as
the Phoenix Project fund-raising campaign gets off to a flying
start on Atom Day.
* * * *
COmplete Final Touces
On Atom Day Program

(Continued from Page 1)

time in the Rackham Amphithea-
tre, Prof. William Haber will lead
a discussion of social science and
the atom.
SPEAKERS LISTED
Prof. G. G. Brown, director of
the' engineering division of AEC
and the University's chemical and
metalurgical engineering depart-
ment; Sheilds Warren, director of
the division of biology and medi-
cine of AEC and Prof. H. R. Crane

DAILY, OFFICIAL, BULLETIN

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 am. Saturdays).
SUNDAY, OCTOBiR 1, 1950
VOL.' LXI, No. 6
Notices
Facilty of the College of Liter-
ature, Science, and the Arts: Meet-
ing, Oct. 2, 4:10 p.m., 1025 Angell
Hall.
- AGENDA
1. Consideration of the minutes
of the meeting of May 1, 1950
(pp. 1597-1601).
2. Presentation of new members.
3. Resolutions for Professors
Philip E. Bursley, Walter F. Col-
by, William A. McLaughlin, Amos
R. Morris, Hereward T. Price, Roy
W. Sellars, and Rene Talamon.
4. Consideration of reports sub-
mitted with the call to this meet-
ing.
a. Evecutive Committee-Prof.
L. A. Leonard.
b. Executive Board of the Grad-
uate School - Prof I. L. Sharf-
man.
c. Deans' Conference - Dean
Hayward Keniston.
5. Program in Television. Prof.
0. R. Garrison.
6. Announcements.
7. New Business.
Art Print Library: Students who
signed for prints may pick them
up on Oct. 2, 3, 4, at 510 Adminis-
tration, from 8-12, 2-5.
Choral Union Ushers: The fol-
lowing ushers pick up your Usher
Cards at the box office in Hill
Auditorium Monday between 5
and 6 p.m.:
Barabar Abar
Earl Aldon
Donald Anderson
Doris Anderson

James Anderson
George Anema
Dorothy Aronson
Marguerite Arozian
Robert Ashley
Jane Paula Assiran
Ellen Axon
Betty Ann Bacon
Bettie Joyce Baker
Neil W. Beach
Arthur L. Beck
Barbara Bell
Mary Elizabeth Bently
Robert B. Bentley
Jack Bergmann
Ann Bernstein
Ann Berruezo
Geraldine Berry
Pearl Berry
Gail Beswick
Jane Birks
Emily Blair
Charles E. Bouwsma
Janice branyan
John W. Bunyan
Morris Caminer
Allen H. Chase
Russel Church
Mildred Cobitz
Joseph Cochin
Lillian Cohen
Carol Colwell
Andrew Corsi
Joan Coutts
Lois Creamer
Gail S. Crouse
Beverly Cunningham
Eleanor Doersam
Carol Eagle
N. Edalatpour
David Eiteman
Howard E. Ellis
Robert A. Elson
Lorraine Firestone
John A. Flower
Jewell O. Foster,-
Lily Fox
Mary Frakes
Phyllis Ginsberg,
John J. Guettler
Florence M. Gunn
George Gunn
Bert Hague
William J. Hall
Charlotte M. Halman

of the physics department will join
in the scientific panel.
Morse Salisbury, AEC director
of public and technical and infor-
mation service; Prof. Marshall E.
Dimock, former Assistant Secre-
tary of Labor, Rensis Likert, direc-
tor of the Survey Rerearch Center
here, Joseph Loftus, air-intelli-
gence specialist of the Air Force,
Richard Tybout, Phoenix fellow in
economics at the University, and
Prof. Robert Angell, chairman of
the sociology department and
member of UNESCO will take part
in the social science symposium.
And nearly 100 meetings scat-
tered over the nation will hear
faculty speakers report on re-
search proposals submitted for
Phoenix sponsorship. .
David R. Hamilton
Lillian Hanjian
John C. Haro
Carolyn L. Hartmann
Judy Haswell
Robert B. Hawkins
James R. Hean
Bruce D. Herrigel
George Howard
Rhoda Horwitz
Tomas V. Hoyer
Dorothya Hinderer
Henry A. Huber
Shirley Ilgovsky
Samuel Irwin
John Mack Jenks
June Jessop
Thedore Johnson
Mary H. Kanno
Doris Krischman
Janet Klein
Donald W. Krummel
Henry Lakin
Whilliam Laxton
Barbara N. Leake
Elaine Levine
Alfred A. Levinson
David R. Luce
William MacMillan
William J. Mahler
Patrica Mann
Renee Mann
Wilbur Markstrom
Winifred A. Martin
Richard A. Marx
Janette May
Margaret McCall
(Continued on Page 4)

The academic year was a new
one, but the same old questions
seemed to be bedeviling campuses
around the country last week as
loyalty oaths, freshman hazing
and the Negro question furnished
many of the headlines in college
papers.
At California the loyalty oath
controversy still dragged on.
Three days before classes began
on the numerous campuses of the
university, President Robert Gor-
don Sproul issued a statement
prohibiting the 26 UC faculty
members who have not signed the
oath from teaching.
This move was evidently unex-
pected because the 26 non-signers
had been assigned some 40 or 50
courses, according to the univer-
sity's general catalogue.
IThen ron the second day of
classes, economics Prof. Robert
A. Gordon blew the campus a lit-
tle wider open by prefacing a lec-
ture with a ten minute blast
against the institution's regents.
"I do not appear here with any
enthusiasm," he told 950 students.
"The Communists saved by job
by marching into South Korea. I
signed because I was afraid the
fight for academic freedom would
become confused with disloyalty."
"Having stuck it out this far,"
Union To Start
Weekly .Bridge
Tournaments
The Michigan Union has some
good news for all bridge enthusi-
asts.
The Union will again sponsor its
weekly duplicate bridge tourna-
ments beginning Wednesday, Oct.
3 at 7:30. The tournaments, which
were first held two years ago, will
offer student experts an oppor-
tunity to test their prowess against
the best the- campus has to offer.
From these tournaments are se-
lected teams to represent the Uni-
versity In all the major Inter-col-
legiate bridge tournaments held
around the country. In two years
of competition the University
teams have compiled an enviable
record in tournament play.
Michigan teams have copped
the trophy both times in the Cen-
tral States Intercollegiate Team-
of.-Four held annually at Chicago.
b ast years winners, Dan Babitch,
Ed Bloom, Al Clamage and Milt
Siegel also captured the Detroit
District intercollegiate held last
September in Detroit.
Each year a University team has
been selected from over a hundred
competing colleges to help repre-
sent this district in the National
Intercollegiate Pairs held in Chi-
cago.
The Union also sponsors an All-
Campus tournament with suitable
trophies annually. The fee for
playing in these tournaments is
$.35 per session (a session usually
means from 24 to 30 hands.)
Union Staff to Meet

Gordon continued, "I'll stay to see
if the University's good name can
be restored. This year 30 of my
colleagues aren't here to give their
classes. This number will grow if
things don't improve."
"This is the faculty's point of
view," Gordon concluded, "and
you should have both sides. There
is also the Regent's side. I can't
tell you where to get that-unless
in the back files of the Hearst
papers. "
Prof. Gordon's speech was greet-
ed with overwhelming applause by
his students, but at the beginning
of last week matters stood pretty
much where they had been stand-
ing all summer. The non-signers
were suspended from the'*UC pay-,
roll but still had at least 60 days
to sign the oath before being dis-
missed.
As to the Negro question and
freshmen hazing: Heman Marion
Sweatt, who had fought a four,
and a half year legal fight to get
admitted to the University of
Texas' Law School, finally made
it this semester, as the result of
a Supreme Court decision in his
favor.
Besides Sweatt, there will; be;
some 15 other Negroes attendingI
Texas.
As he registered, dogged by re-
porters and photographers, Sweatt
explained part of his philosophy
to one of the writers: "I will prob-
ably practice law in Houston, for
I feel that the ill-effects of the
segregated system on my race
were brought about by our going
out of state for a decent education
and staying out when we got it."
The only reaction- of the stu-
dents in the registration line ? with
Sweatt seemed to be one of cu-
riosity. "Is that Sweatt?" they
asked each other, and then ans-
wered "'That's the boy."
On the freshman hazing front,
affairs seemed to be pretty much
at a stand off. Amid the expected
hub-bub, freshman "customs"
were ushered back 'on the campus
at Penn State.
Though the frosh struck back
a trifle bitterly at their upperclass
tormentors by hanging four of
them in effigy, it seemed pretty
well agreed that a fine time was
had by all.
But at Northwestern the paper
printed a short item which de-
clared: "Members of this year's
freshman class will not be re-
quired to wear dinks," and then
went on to explain, "The decision
was a result of the difficulties en-
countered in trying to establish
dink-wearing last fall."

MICHIGAN DAILY .
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING'
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday Is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
BUSINESS SERVICES
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist at
308 S. State. Legal, Masters, Doctors,
dissertations, etc. Call 2-9848 or 2-
4228. )12B
TYPJWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S - 314 S. State St. )4B
WET WASHES, rough dry or ironing.
!Finished work if preferred. Will pick
up and deliver. Ph, 2-9020. )1B
HOOVER sales and service. Phone Tay-
lor, 2-0298 or Goodyears 3-4171. )1997
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Service
Cornp any, 215 E. Liberty. Guaranteed
repair service on all makes of type-
writers. ) 6B
QUALITY TYPING-Manuscripts, theses
etc. Call 2-0795 or 2-7460. )17B
LEAVE JUNIOR with a reliable baby
sitter while you go out - anytime.
Kiddie Bare, 3-1121. )10B
Read Daily Classifieds
New Gargoyle
To Appear Soon
The Gargoyle, suspended last
semester by the Board in Control!
of Student Publications, will ap-
pear once more in Ann Arbor
about the first of November.
Garg's managing editor, Robert
Uchitelle, has announced the'
opening of a contest to find the ,
best jokes and ancedotes about
campus life for publication in the,
Garg.

ROOM and BOARD
WANTED-Male student to work 8
hours weekly in return for unusually
nice quarters and private bath. Other
privileges in suburban home. Should
havecar but not essential. Phone
2-3844. )11A
FOR RENT
ROOM IN Publications Building for
Grad and Senior pictures. Rent is
only $2.00 so hurry, since there are
only a few choice places left. Call:
9-12 A.M., 2-5 P .M. MICHIGANEN-1
SIAN. )14F
DOUBLE FOR RENT. $5.50 apiece. Ph.
8746 after 5:30. )13F
2 ROOM SUITE for three. $6.50. Also
single. Mon. call after 5:30. Ph. 8746.
)13F1
STUDENT WIFE or coed to work at
Snack Bar. Campus section. Days,
Monday thru Friday. Phone 5464 or
6087. ) 21H
YOUNG LADY for full time work at
soda fountain. Swift's Drug Store,
340 S. State St. Ph. 2-0534. )15H1
GIRLS NEEDSED to baby sit during foot-
ball games. Call Kiddie Kare, 3-1121.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Part-time shoe clerk. Exper-
ience preferred. Apply in person.
Shoe Department. Mademoiselle Shop!
)19HI
TYPISTS NEEDED soon Speed import-
ant. Use own typewriter. Call Don
Anderson. Student Periodical Agency,
2-82-42. )2H
CO-ED OR student w ife to a.ssist
mother with lt. housework any two
hours between 8 & 12 a.m. Ph. 3-8454.
WANTED-Competent Sunday School
teachers. Good compensation. Beth.
Isreal Center. 1429 Hill. 2-7376 for in-
formation. Mrs. Schetzer. )22H
FULL OR PART TIME HELP-Apply at
Howard Johnson's, Washtenaw and
Stadium..Tel. 3-8800. )11H
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE OR RIDERS WANTED from Dear-
born. Call Tiffany 6-2855 or write Box
226 Daily. )12T
WANTED TO BUY
BOHEMIAN minded student decorators
!want fish net - large size, second
hand, CHEAP,_392Jordan, 3-1561 )13X
WANTED-One Michigan vs.~Army tic-
ket. Call Jackie, 3-8506. )12X;
FOR SALE
MOTOR BIKE - Good condition, very
reasonable. Phone Dick, 2-7849. )23
'49 CROSLEY, 2 door sedan. Excellent
condition. 35 MPH. Ph. 2-7521 or 2-
801_5. ) 28
MOTORCYCLE-1948 Indian 74 Chief
with all extras. Phone 8976. )27

I' 'I

Ph. 5651

FOR SALE
ALL COLOR PARAKEE''S, Canaries.
Finches, Cocketiels. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th. Ph. 5330. )ZS
Your White Elephants Have
"GREEN BACKS"
ALL WEATHER Jackets, $4.99; Watr
repellent, zipper front, gray, tan, teal,-
bark. Open 'til 6 p.m. Sam's' Store,
122 E Washington. )5
LOST AND FOUND
TAN WALLET with contents of value
to owner. Reward. D. Bratton. Ph.
3-4183. )14L
LOST-Blond cocker spaniel pup in
vicinity of Catherine and Ingals St.
Information please. Call 2-9215. Re-
ward. )15L
LOST-K&E slide rule. Name on case
is Dudley Newton. Ph. 8257. )13L
OOMS FOB kRNT
SUITE TO SHARE with male student.
Twin beds. 304 E. Madison. T. )17B
ROOMS available for students' guests.
Football week-ends. Private home ac-
commodations. Phone 2-9850, 12:30 to
1:00 or 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. )14R
WAN E D-One male student to share
double room on campus. Call 2-2052.
) 13R
CARETAKER WANTED across from
Rackham, one room apt, with private
bath, for student planning to be here
2 or 3 years summer and winter, in
exchange for services. Automatic gas
heat. Ph. Stewart at 8744 or Atkins
at 25-8882. )26R
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS at
518 E. Williams. Ph. 3-8454. U )2R
STUDIO APARTMENT-3 boys or mar-
ried coupe. Light housekeeping. Ph.
6649. )25R
1/2 DOUBLE for upper classman near
campus. Innerspring mattress, show-
ers , cooking privileges, gas heat. 415
Lawrence. shown from 603 Lawrence.
Ph. 2-3673 or Ypsilanti 794J. )1MR
3RD FLOOR studio near campus. Pre-
fer two to four art or arch, men stu-
dents. Linens. Use of darkroom. Stu-
dent landlord. Ph. 2-8545, 6-7. )23R
ROOMS for rent one block from
campus. Clean housse and shower'
bath. Verycomfortable. Tel. 8894.")22R
TOURIST ROOMS for Sat. night, Sept.
30, at 518 E. Williams. Ph. 3-8454. )1H
PE RSONA L
LEARN TO-DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
122 E. Liberty Phone 8161 )1P,
BORED TODAY? Sign up for a year of
TIME or LIFE at the student rates.
You'll have entertainment for your
leisure hoursd -and detailed news
coverage. Student Periodical Agency,
your student-run agency. Phone 2-
82-42.
CLUB 21 1
TO ALL CLUB 211 MEMBERS:
Your ticket expires only when com-
pletely punched. Need not be used on
consecutive days-good anytime. Take
advantage of this for delicious meals.'
)2p
LEARN T Dn

An Intimate Theatre
rresenting Cinema Attractions
From All Nations

na athDance Studi
class or Private Lessons
209 S. State Ph. A.A. 5083

)4P

4

41

.4

ow

I

SECRETARIAL
ACCOUNTING

A meeting of the old Union staff
will be held at 5 p.m. Tuesday inj
room 3D in the Union, James Mor-
an, '52, Union councilman, an-!
nounced yesterday.
Moran said problems of the year
would be discussed and that re-j
freshments will be served.

4

I! e 4
lya

BRADS
Awk
3iENIORS

I

I 1

i
i
i

TYPEWRITING
GREGG SHORTHAND
BUSINESS MACHINES
MACHINE SHORTHAND
Courses may be completed in from
9 months to 18 months. Free
Placement Service. Many good
positions, at excellent salaries, are
being offered to our gfaduates.
Young Men of Draft Age
A business course will help you
to win a higher rank, better
pay, if you are called.
Approved for training
Veterans

NO

Sunday
Mondaya
. MAIN--OPP. COURTHOUSE MAT. 30c I

Tuesday
Wednesday
NIGHTS & SUN. 40c

LLOYD BRIDGES
"ROCKET
SHIP
XMr

Always
TWO

ROBERT ALDA
in

HITS!

"HollywoodHAMILTON
Varieties" BUSINESS COLLEGE
State & William Ph. 7831

Have you made your
picture appointment?

An Interesting Collection of Rare
ANTIQUE S
Everything Imported
China, glass, silver, pistols, etc. including
old seals and cameos suitable for jewelry mounting. c
R. R. PATTERSON & ASSN.Q
LOpen Daily 10 to 6 331 East Huron St.
Sunday Afternoons Ann Arbor, Mich.
> toosc coco c c)ocom <en

11

-g
-,THEATRE__-

NOW SHOWING
(Ends Monday Night)

TODAY of 1:30
3:36 - 5:26 - 7:30 - 9:30

There are picture sections in the

1951

Michiganensian for those graduat-
ing in February, June and August.

TilE

INTI1 STORY OF ILYLA INM
TURNER"MILLAND

Time is fleeting,

so make your ap-

pointment -,while there

is available

{

7' :f f :.. :}:':1 'i;

space.
Place: Student Publications Build-

in M-G.M's
('A F FlVAEI~

ing. Office Hours:

9-12 A.M.; 2-5,

- F_

sli

I

III

III

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