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September 30, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-30

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AiU DAY,SENEMBEIL so, 199 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREI

Ti gers Blow

Last Chance As

Yanks

'Win AL Flag

PIGSKINS FLYING AGAIN:
Conference Teams Begin Action Today

Tribe Crushes Detroit 12-2;
Hands Pennant to New York

II

Major League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE- NATIONAL LEAGUE

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO-Eight Big Ten foot-
ball teams swing into action today
with various intersectional clashes
niarking the pre-conference warm-
up schedule.
Elsewhere in the Midwest, pow-
erful Notre Pame puts its 38 game
streak on the line against North
Carolina in its season inaugural'
at South Bend.
* * *
OHIO STATE, Western Confer-
ence co-champion, has one of the
toughest assignments as it opens
against Southern Methodist who
already boast a 33-13 win ovr
Georgia Tech..
Other games involving Big
Ten members finds Indiana
journeying to Nebraska, Minne-
sota to the coast to meet Wash-
ington, and Purdue south to
battle Texas.
The remaining teams open at
home with Wisconsin host to Mar-
quette, Illinois greeting Ohio Uni-
vrseity, and Northwestern holding
forth against Iowa State in all
easy encounters.
The league campaign opens a
week from tomorrow with two
games, Wisconsin at Illinois and
Iowa at Indiana. The following
Saturday, Ohio State enters the
race at Indiana, and Minnesota
and Northwestern clash at Evan-
ston.
* * *
MICHIGAN AND Purdue are
last to plunge into their Con-

v

ference schedule faciny Wisconsin
and Iowa respectively on October
21.

.

Michigan State does not en-
ter the Big Ten football champ-
ionship until 1953.
In 1949, Notre Dame Coach
Leahy took stock of his team,
brushed a tear from *s eyes, and
predicted the worst. Then the Irish
went out and beat North Carolina,
42-6, and proceeded to run up
their victory skein 'to 38 at the
end of the campaign.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY of Oklaho-
ma, which boasts a streak of 21
in a row and Army, with 20, both
get into action against relatively
weak foes and should have no
trouble stretching their streaks
one more each.
Oklahoma plays host to Bos-
ton College at: Norman, while
Army tangles with one of its
'local neighbors, Colgate. BC,
off its opening 7-7 tie with
Wake Forest is not in the same,
league with Oklahoma. Colgate
could cause trouble for some
fair-to-middlin' teams but
against the Cadets, it apparent-
ly has jumped into a pond over
its head.
Rice, which won the Southwest
Conference Championship last
year, takes on Santa Clara at
Houston.
In the South, the big one is
Alabama at Tulane. This is rated

pretty much of a toss-up, for the
odds have been fluctuating. At
the moment, Alabama is a six-
point favorite, and that's how it's
likely to be at game time.
Maryland, 'which had its high
hopes for taking the mythical na-
tional honors shattered last week,
plays Navy. Unless Maryland was
just getting the bad one out of
its system last time, Navy could
come out on top.
Two of the other best games of
the day pit Washington State:
against UCLA on the West Coast
and Dartmouth against Holy '
Cross in the east.
Line-Ups

OZZIE CLARK
... Veteran Flanker

* * *

MSC

Pos.'

MICH.

Bob Carey
Don Coleman
John Yocca
D. Tamburo
John Tobin
Bill HorrellI
H. Minarik 1
Al Dorow 4
E. Grandelius'
V. Pisano l

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RRH

Ozzie Clark
John Hess,
Al Jackson
John Padjen
Tom Kelsey
A. Wahl-Cap.
Harry Allis
Bill Putich
C. Ortmann
L. Koceski
Don Dufek

DETROIT-(OP)-The hard-hit-
ting Cleveland Indians blasted the
Detroit Tigers' American League
pennant hopes yesterday as they
smashed out 15 hits in a 12-2 rout
that ended the Tigers' chances of
catching the New York Yankees
in the pennant race.
Big Bob Lemon, the American
League's leading pitcher, halted
the Tigers with six scattered hits
to get his 23rd win of the year
and help 'the Yankees to their
second straight pennant.
* * *
THE INDIANS backed him up
with a devastating onslaught on
four Tiger pitchers. They scored
in six different innings with Jim
Hegan and Dale Mitchell each
contributing a home run to the
complete rout.
Detroit had one big- moment
of hope when leadoff man Jerry
Priddy homered in the first inn-
ing to send the Tigers into a
short-lived 1-0 lead. It soon
melted, though, as the Indians
rocked the Tigers time. and
again with booming hits,
The defeat ended what at best
would have been a terrific uphill
struggle for the Tigers.
As things stand now, the Tigers
will have to fight off a last-minute
rush by the Boston Red Sox to
hold on to the runner-up spot.
THEY TRAIL the Yankees by
three full games, but have only
a one-game bulge over the third-
place Red Sox.
Little Teddy Gray, who lost
a heart-breaking 2-1 decision to
Lemon Sunday, was the loser
again today but this time it
wasn't even close.
Gray held the. Xndians hitless
through two innings, but they

L. Crane-Cap. FB

N ew York WhipsLitorts

NEW YORK--(P)-George Rat-
terman qnd Sherman Howard
combined tonight to give the or-
phaned New York Yanks a 44 to
21 victory over the Detroit Lions
in a National Football League
' . ,game.
Ratterman set a hatful of club
records. In all, he tossed 28 passes
and completed 15 for 264 yards.
Four heaves resulted in touch-
--downs. He made 22 of those passes
inthe firstdhalf and registered 238
of the yards.
IN CONTRAST, Bobby Layne of
the Lions, pressed all the way and
once 'down behind his own goal
line for a safety, completed ten
of 30 that gained 118 yards. None
went for a touchdown.
Howard, a third string half-

back, romped for three markers.
One of his tallies came on an
89-yard kickoff return.
The game was played in the
Polo Grounds instead of Yankee
Stadium to keep intact the turf
where the American League half
of the coming World Series will be
played. Despite the switch in
parks, some 12,482 customers
found their way to the proceed-
ings.
Ratterman tossed 21 yards to
George Taliaferro for the first
marker and then found Howard
twice for 37 and 31 yards before
the. first half ended with the
Yanks in front, 21 to 7.
The Lions' first marker came.
when Bob Smith intercepted a
Ratterman toss and romped 35
yards.

* * *
OFFICIALS: Ref.eree, Rollie
Barnum (Wisconsin); Umpire,
John Wilson (Ohio State); Field
Judge, M. J. Delaney (St. Viator);
Head Linesman,. John R. McPhee
(Oberlin); Fifth Official, A. T.
Skover (Detroit).
GAME TIME: 2 p.m. (EST)
ATTENDANCE: 97,000
BROADCASTS: WWJ Detroit
(Ty Tyson); WJR Detroit (Van
Patrick); WPAG Ann Arbor (Bob
Ufer); WUOM U. of Mich. (Bill
Flemming); WJIM Lansing (How-
ard Finch); WKAR Lansing (Bob
Shackleton); WILS Lansing (Bud
Lynch); WWCA Gary, Ind.
(See page 1 for game details.)
Star Athletes
Face Induction
DETROIT-The U. S. Army
claimed two prominent athletes
from the state of Michigan yes-
terday as Arthur Houtteman, De-
troit Tiger pitcher, and Dominic
Tomasi, former Michigan football
captain, faced induction in the
near future.
Houtteman's attempt to enlist
in the Michigan Air National
Guard was rejected by state ad-
All persons interested in en-
tering the All-campus bowling
league are urged to attend a
meeting at 7:30 p.m. on Mon-
day, October 2nd, in room L-M
of the Union.
Those who have already
formed teams are requested to
attend at 7:00 p.m.
-Phil Genser.
jutant general George C. Moran,
and the young Bengal ace had his
case returned to his local draft
board.
Tomasi, a guard on two national
champion Wolverine teams, will
be inducted into the Army on Oc-
tober 9.

pushed over a run in the third to
tie the score as Robert Avila
opened Cleveland's 15-hit barrage
with a long double.
That was just the start of a long
disappointing afternoon for 9,814
who saw the Indians pummel Gray
and his three successors almost at
will. Clevland wrapped up the
game in a big four-hit, three-run
fifth inning which boomed them
into a 5-1 lead. It was all over
then and the Tigers played as if
they knew it.
* * *
Bums' Twin
Win Raises
TitleHopes
BROOKLYN-(A)-The Dodg-
ers came off the floor twice yes-
terday, to out-claw the Boston
Braves in both games of a double-
header at Ebbets Field, 7-5 and
7-6, and keep their pennant hopes
flickering.
If they can capsize the Phila-
delphia Phillies both tomorrow and
in the final game of the campaign
Sunday the two clubs will finish
in a dead tie for -the National
League flag. Only 11 days ago the
Dodgers were nine games out of
first place.
* S*
IT LOOKED as though it was
all over when the Dodgers went
into the eighth inning of the first
game trailing by 2 to 5, and with
Max Surkont of the Braves mow-
ing them down methodically.
But then, with two down and
the bases filled, the dike sudden-
ly broke. Earl Torgeson and
Gene Mauch of the Braves com-
mitted glaring errors on ground
balls at first and second, and
before the panic subsided the
Brooks had poured five unearn-
ed runs across and had sewn up
the decision.
So then the Bostons started out
to win the second behind their 19-
game winner, Vern Bickford. They
piled into 'Chris Van Cuyk, the
huge Brooklyn rookie, for a 4-1
lead and slammed him from the
box in the third inning. Again the
issue seemed to have been settled.
A three-run sixth inning off
Bickford tied it up at 6-6, Campa-
nella again providing the key blow
with a double to right as a chilled
crowd of 5,843 rent the evening
air over Flatbush. Jackie Robin-
son, first up for the Dodgers in the
seventh, wrapped it up with his
14th homer of the year into the
left field seats.,
IiION

New York
Detroit
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
Chicago,
St. Louis
Philadelphia

DORNE DIBBLE
... MSC End

W L
97 55
94 5$
93 59
91 61
67 86,
58 93
57 94
51 102

Pct.
.638
.618
.612
.599
.438
.384
.337
,333

GB
3
4
6
30%/
38x/
39 /
462

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 12, Detroit 2
Boston 7, Washington 6
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Boston - Nevel
(0-0), Burdette (0-0) and Mad-
ison (0-0) vs. Parnell (18-9).
(Yank pitchers will pitch three
innings each.)
St. Louis at Chicago-Widmar
(7-14) vs. Pierce (11-16).
Cleveland at Detroit-Garcia
(11-10) or Pieretti (0-1) vs.
Newhouser (14-13).
(Only Games Scheduled.){

Philadelphia
Brooklyn
New York
Boston
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh

'GERMAN BULLET':
Sichigan AIl-American
Surprised Grid Experts

College Grid Scores
* * * * * *
Geneva (Pa.) 9, Waynesburg 6 Syracuse 6, Temple 7
West Virginia Tech 20, Slippery Detroit 34, Wayne 0.
Rock 0 Heidelberg 14, Hillsdale 6'
Abilene-Christian 13, Chatta- Morris Brown 27, Hampton In-
nooga 7 stitute 0
EVERY DAY is
Chicken-in-the-Basket
Our Specialty at "fi
95c
ORDERS TO GO OUT
AT LAST ...
Real Italian Spaghetti 60GC
Beverage. included
i v
Summer Hours: 6:30 A.M. to 2 P.M.-S to 8 P.M.
For a well prepared meal at reasonable
prices in clean surroundings, you
are cordially invited to try -
Sthe belniore restaurant.
1142 Catherine - Across from Beal Residence
L o :::::o oe: <;e ¬ęc=r>0<o=>o a<==>0-= c,

i

Headquarters for

ESTERBROOK

Fountain Pens

$200

and $250

-Complete Stock of Extra Points
ULRICHs
Ann Arbor's Busy Bookstore

By GEORGE FLINT
One of Michigan's greatest All-
Americans, Johnny Maulbetsch,
died in Ann Arbor in September,
and with him passed a football
legend.
Maulbetsch, chosen on Walter
Camp's 1914 All-American squad,
was a pint-sized halfback even
in the days when a football player
didn't have to weigh fifteen stones
to make a big-time college team.
The "German Bullet" weighed 156
pounds but his plunging and
slices off tackle devastated oppos-
ing defenses.
AFTER CAMP named Maul-
betsch to his star squad, the late
Ring Lardner wrote that the
Michigan back had "destroyed the
myth of eastern foodtball super-
iority."
That was high praise from
such a man as Lardner at a
time when the eastern teams
and players had been dominat-
ing the sport for a decade.
And the Wolverine bullet de-
served the hosannas from the
east, since his performance in a
losing cause against Harvard was
one of the greatest performanes
ever seen in the Crimson coop.
With the high and mighty Har-
vards playing fast and loose with
the mythical national title, Michi-
gan's poor relations from the corn
country came into Cambridge bent
on victory.
s s* *
IT WASN'T in the books for
Fielding Yost's team to win their
big test, since penalties and a cost-
ly fumble gave Harvard the one
touchdown which spelled a Maize
and Blue defeat.

But Maulbetsch punched away
at the Crimson line for three
yards, two yards, eight yards.
Injured twice, the German Bul-
let got up from the turf to re-
new the battle each time.-
Maulbetsch picked up a.total
of 133 yards rushing in the 7-0
defeat. It was his performance
against the Crimson which made
eastern observers change their
minds about the quality of mid-
west football.
Old-Time6'M
GridderDies
Frederick A. Maynard, '98, a
member of Michigan's first foot-
ball team, died at Bradenburg,
Florida.
Maynard, who played with the
Wolverines when they first essay-
ed the sport in 1874, was honored
in 1947 as being the oldest living
alumnus of the University,
He leaves a son, Nelson, of New
York City.

I

'I

,ren

a

Bik

0

i''(

SIGMA NU

I

Alumni, Faculty,
Transfers
Please call or stop at
house to leave local ad-
dress and phone number.
We want to help you with
mail and inquiries.

DON'T WALK!

Don't waste countless hours!

I

time can be conserved pleasantly and conveniently by
bicycling to class.
Rent a bike BY THE SEMESTER, it's better' than buying.
No repairs, no depreciation, no long-term investment.
Special Semester Rate-$1.00 to $1.50 a week.
ARE YOU WALKING while your bicycle is being re-
paired? No need to walk - Rent a bike under this
special rate-$1.00 to $1.50 a week.
DO YOU RIDE FOR PLEASURE? We have bicycles for
rent by the hour or day. Special arrangements can be

700 OXFORD

8257

III

FOOTBALL MATINEE
EVERY SATURDAY
THROUGHOUT FOOTBALL SEASON
From 4:30 to 8:30
at
CLUB KOMO
834 Green St. at Davis
2 Blocks-from Stadium
Program for Sat., Sept. 30
BILLY CARTER
and his
ALL-STAR REVUE
2 Complete Shows
HE GREAT CARAZINI .M. and 7 P.M.

made for Sunday.

,r

YOU CAN LAUGH at traffic and parking problems!
Bicycling is the ideal transportation in Ann Arbor.

EXPERT REPAIRING

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