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January 12, 1951 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1951-01-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Regent
Hayward
IBUTES usually come too late.
We name our institutions and land-
marks after those who, sometimes un-
sung, have passed away. It is rare when
outstanding men receive in their lifetime
the gratitude of those whom they have
benefited.
Regent Ralph Hayward died yester-
day without due recognition. And it is
a sad and belated undertaking to pay
tribute to a man who is now only a
memory.
Few of the University's administrators
have so capably and conscientiously
worked for this institution as did Regent
Hayward. As a member of the Board
of Regents, his was a thankless and pay-
less task. But he executed it as a duty
to education and democracy.
Regent Hayward stood in the minority
as a cool-headed builder with an informed
and logical mind unswayed by emotion.
This faculty is all too rare in a world
prone to hysteria.
A former University professor, Regent
Hayward understood the aims and prob-
lems of teaching. In addition to his
trusteeship here, he also sat on the
Board of Trustees of Kalamazoo College.
And he relished the rare opportunities
when he could take part in actual te'ach-
ing.
He felt that education was essential
to a free society--education for schol-
arly pursuits, business and the pro-
fessions. He carried this philosophy
into the realm of industry. As president
of a large corporation, he saw that
every employer and stockholder was
given full information of the company's
affairs.
He was a sincere and intense champion
of free enterprise, a guardian of oppor-
tunity for the man at the bottom of the
ladder.
But Regent Hayward didn't know
how to say "no." He was a natural
leader whose great personal resources
he gave too 'generously. He was not
content to be associated nominally
with the countless projects and activi-
ties which he was asked to direct or
aid. His interest was too keen, his
ability too much sought after. And his
life was shortened as a result.
The untimely death of Ralph Hayward
not only leaves a vacancy on the Board
of Regents but a void in the hearts of
all who knew him. -The Editors

Enlistment Dilemma

STUDENT DRAFT deferment is similar to
the weather-there is plenty of talk
about it but no action.
While proposals and recommendations
have been offered from university and
government officials about letting certain
students complete their education, many
of the men in question have found an
answer to the problem themselves: en-
listment.
Generally this time in the semester is
full of final exam problems. But this year
University men are preoccupied with what
many of them feel is the most important
problem of their lives-draft or enlistment.
And at present enlistments have hit a high
for the Korean crisis. How many of these
are students out to beat the draft is not
easily ascertainable. But every day bring$
more 'stories of students who have "out-
smarted" the government by enlisting.
Enlistments continue in spite of many
warm words from University officials who

encourage students to keep at their usual
routine awaiting further clarification of
the draft.
It is somewhat doubtful that much of
the enlistment rush has been inspired by
patriotic fervor. Present enlistments have
increased mainly because eligible men feel
that this is the best deal in the armed
forces. For students, as all the rest, this is
perhaps true. Although it might be best to
wait until the end of this semester, no gen-
eral solution can be offered.
As it is, with various stages of the draft
in effect, and questions about reserve and
veteran status, most students have no
clear-cut idea of where they stand. The
best way out seems to be enlistment.
If university and government officials
want to see that certain students complete
their education, they had better move a
little more rapidly in clarifying the draft
law as it effects students.
-Vernon Emerson

1/K1

f.

6LAIR

"He Didn't Entirely Go Along With The Idea"

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 22 to FEBRUARY 2, 1951
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
for courses having recitations only, the time of the class is the
time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be exam-
ined at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12
o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes and other "irregu-
lar" classes may use any examination period provided there is no
conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are arranged for by
the "irregular" class). A final examination period is available for
"irregular" classes which are unable to utilize an earlier period.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination may be
changed without the consent of the Committee on Examinations.

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Roses for Wolverine Club

T HE DAILY doesn't always throw daggers.
When a job is well-done, we like to dis-.
tribute a few bouquets, too. And the Wol-
verine Club certainly deserves a big one.
For Corky Gibbon and Larry Bloch, in
charge of making arrangements for a
student round-trip to California, the Rose
Bowl began the Monday following the
Ohio State game. Right after the snowy
victory in Columbus, railroad represen-
tatives came "flocking in droves."
Interviewing agents of every railroad in
the United States with lines west of the
Mississippi, the Wolverine Club finally
chose two, a southern route going out and
a central route for the return trip, this

1-CIINIEMA

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t

Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: DAVIS CRIPPEN
IThe WeekendI

In Town

2

EVENTS OF INTEREST about campus:
-- SPORTS _
THE ELUSIVE PUCK will steel the local
sports limelight when Michigan's hockey
squad tangles with Montreal University's
"Carabins," in a two-game series. Faceoff
at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow, Coliseum.
MICHIGAN AND INDIANA University
grapplers will vie for honors at the varsity
wrestling match at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, at
Yost Field House.
-- DANCES -
ROLL OUT THE LOGS, boys-Paul Bun-
yan's back in town to attend the annual
Forestry Club 'informal' formal. highlights
of the evening; intermission-time sawing
contest, longest bar in Ann Arbor, Paul
Lavoie and his Giant Sequoias will play
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. tomorrow in Water-
man Gymnasium.
L*
-- DRAMA -
SECOND IN THE SERIES of one-act
playbills will feature life in 19th century
Michigan and present-day San Francisco
as subjects of two of the offerings. Enacted
and directed by University students. At 8
p.m. today in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
STATE SECRET, a thriller and a corker
based on traps and chases. A Columbia pic
featuring Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. At the
Michigan for the last time today.NEVER
A DULL MOMENT, starring Irene Dunne,
starts tomorrow. Cartoon, news and oddity
tossed in.
SOUTHSIDE 1-1000, describes the sensa-
tional story of a hot money mob. Carrying
the load is Don Defore and Andrea King. Al-
so at no extra charge, FAREWELL TO YES-
TERDAY, a picture for a free people, a free
America and a free world. Both features
run today and tomorrow at the State. Sun-
day, Alan Ladd does the honors in BRAND-
ED.
MAD ABOUT OPERA, a French operatic
film extravaganza with English titles begins
today at the Orpheum. Beniamino Gigle
sings your favorite arias.
THEY WERE FIVE,, an arresting, drama-
tic contrast of spirited comedy with tragedy
featuring Jean Gabin and Viviane Romance.

At Lane Hall.,.
FIVE EXPERIMENTAL MOVIES, all pro-
duced by Maya Deren. Presented by Tri-
ton Film Society.
"EXPERIMENTAL" is the correct way to
describe these, Maya Deren's total out-
put of avante garde film. There is nothing
new in her techniques ("new" that is, in the
sense of having never been used) nor is her
attempt to create a filmic poetry of motion
entirely of her origin. The value and ori-
ginality of these films lies in their unique
editing, the well-conceived handling of the
camera and her exploration of the possibili-
ties of employing the film to present the
problems which her philosophy of a rela-
tivistic universe presents to the individual.
She destroys the static relation of Time
and Space by her imaginative use of the
camera and judicious cutting and editing
(accomplished, for instance, by filming
the beginning of a movement in one place,
stopping the camera, and concluding it
in another). The difficulty lies in that the
results are often disconcerting as well as
unintelligible.
Miss Deren's concern is for Art, modern
Art, and in her search for ideas she has ap-
propriated the conventional themes of the
modern unconventional art forms: the pe-
culiarities of Time and Space, the reality of
dreams, the symbolism of the modern dance
forms, and many of the symbols of modern
literature. Through these media she trys to
portray abstractions; to reduce "concepts"
to a poetry of motion. Her interests are al-
ways subjective, though diversified; the re-
lationships are as perceived by a central
character, though the photography is
usually straight and objective.
Probably the most successful film of the
group was the first, "Meshes of the After-
noon" and this because it was the most
comprehensible to the uninitiated mind.
But for the most part her efforts to create
an art form which can be understood emo-
tionally fails because it is too complex; it
degenerates into a fantastic jig-saw puzzle
wherein the audience must first find and
then consciously translate every sequence
and symbol into pieces which can be placed
in the proper positions in .order to under-
stand the whole. Lack of simplicity makes it
an overintellectualized, rather than an emo-
tionalized experience..
-Allan Clamage.

doubleselection giving students a change in
scenery.
Just a sampling of the many things the*
Wolverine Club did to give Rose Bowl
followers a top-rate vacation:
1. T r a i n arrangements - extra-fare,
streamline equipment at reduced prices.
2. Taxi and Parmalee arrangements
transfer of students and baggage to and
from stations in both Chicago and Los An-
geles.
3. Bus arrangements - transportation to
and from Pasadena on New Years Day,
when public vehicles in Los Angeles are at
a premium.
4. Hotel arrangements - room reserva-
tions at a downtown Los Angeles hotel,
which offered the best rates and required
no down payment.
5. Parade arrangements - grand stand
seats for the Tournament of Roses. about
the only way to view the parade, without
reserving curb space at 3 a.m. New Years
Day.
5. Selling tickets in the Administration
Building; charting reservations for two
train lines, a hotel, a bus company and a
grand stand owner, keeping Count of stu-
dents on the train; giving out information
both on the train and in the hotel; planning
victory parties; tipping; refunding money
on tickets that weren't used; and settling
165 individual ticket problems which "had
to come out right."
Any shortcomings of the Wolverine
Club's trip should be forgotten in a round
of applause for the hard-working group
that made the Rose Bowl vacation in all
ways a real "Special."
-Nancy Bylan
Sidewuvalks
ERTAIN SKEPTICAL psychology pro-
fessors notwithstanding, University stu-
have proved, to our satisfaction any-
daythat their mentality at least equals
that of certain white mice. We seem to re-
call a test used by psychologists to deter-
mine intelligence in dumb animals, in which
the mouse is sent through a maze of bar-
riers, narrow passages and obstacles, to
emerge at the other end with a piece of
cheese. Put a ten o'clock class in the place
of the cheese, and a good parallel can be
drawn between this test and the Michigan
student in a hurry.
Of late, the University plant depart-
ment has been forced to erect snow fences
to prevent students from wandering off
the sidewalks and onto one of the small
paths which scar the lawn. Some years,
ago, hedges were planted for much the
same purpose. It is a tribute to the per-
spicuity of the Michigan student that the
little paths are not only still bare, they
are getting bigger and barer all the time.
Conceivably, we will be able to do away
with sidewalks altogether before long.,
Any self-respecting white mouse would
shudder and give up when confronted with
the equivalent of forty feet of snow fence,
to say nothing of a couple hundred yards
of hedge. But Euclid is too much with us;
a straight line must be the shortest dis-
tance to that ten o'clock, even if achieving
it entails a bit of cross-country work.
It's reassuring to note that some students
are 'still capable of defying great odds to
manage this. -Chuck Elliott

cerning these examinations and
others offered by the Detroit Civil
Service Commission, call at the
Bureau of Appointments, Room
3528, Administration Bldg.
The Tobe-Coburn School for
Fashion Careers of New York of-
fers three fashion fellowships to
senior women graduating in 1951.
Each fellowship covers full tui-
tion of $950 for 1951-1952. Con-
testants - register in January,
write on Fashion Test Topics in
February. Winners will be an-
nounced in April. Registration
blanks may be obtained from the
Bureau of Appointments, Room
3528, Administration Bldg.
The Siegler Enamel Co., of
Centralia, Illinois, needs a recent
graduate in mechanical engineer-
ing with some credits in com-
bustion engineering or heating
engineering. Also, a recent sales
trainee graduate for factory sales
representative.
The Tappan Stove Co. of Mans-
field, Ohio needs one mechanical
or industrial* engineer and two
electrical engineers. Some ex-
perience is preferred, but recent
graduates will be considered.
The American Radiator & Stan-
dard Sanitary Corp. of Yonkers,
New York, needs mechanical en-
gineers, graduating in February,
to work in appliance testing in
their Gas Dept. and in Air Con-
ditioning Research. For further
information concerning these
jobs, call at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, Room 3528, Admin-
istration Bldg.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of
the Department of History and
the School of Education. "Who
Teaches American History?" Dr.
A. C. Krey, Professor of History,
University of Minnesota. 4:15 p.-
m., Fri., Jan. 12, Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
University Lecture, sponsored by
the Geology Department, "Tec-
tonic Framework of North Am-
erica" (illustrated), Dr. Armand
Eardley, Professor of Geology a
University of Utah, Jan. 12, 8
p.m., Science Auditorium, Natur-
al Science Bldg. Dr. Eardley i
the distinguished lecturer selecte
by the American Association o
Petroleum Geologists for thei
current lecture tour.
University Lecture, auspices o
theDepartmentrof Philosophy
" Thinking. " Professor Gilber
Ryle, Oxford University, England
Fri., Jan. 12, 8 p.m., 1025 Angel
Hall.
University Lecture: Joseph H
Fruton, Professor of Physiologica
Chemistry, Yale University, wil
deliver two university lectures un
der the auspices of the Depart
ment of Biological Chemistry
Room 1400, Chemistry Building
4:15 p.m. as follows:
Mon., Jan. 15-"The mode o
action of the proteolytic enzym
es."
Tues, Jan. 16-"The metaboli
transformations of peptides."
Academic Notices

(Continued from Page 3)

DAILY OFFICIAL.BULLETIN

Fri., Jan. 12, 3 p.m., Room 3056.
Natural Science Bldg.
History 11, Lecture Group 2:
Final Exam will be held in Wa-
terman Gym.
History 91: Final Exam will be
held in 1025 A.H.
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri.,
Jan., 12, 4:15 p.m., Observatory.
Speaker: Mr. William Liller,
"Astronomical Photo - electric
Photometry."
Project M720-1: Meeting, Mon.,
Jan. 15, 4 p.m., Room 3001, An-
gell -Hall.
Game Theory Seminar: Mon.,
Jan. 15, at 7:30 p.M., Room 3001,
Angell Hall.
Actuarial Seminar: Fri., Jan.
12, 3 p.m. Miss Marjorie Van-
Eenam will begin a discussion of
Insured Group Retirement Plans.
Doctoral Examination for Hen-
ry L. Bretton, Political Science;
thesis: "The Foreign Policy of
Gustav Stresemann with Respect
to the Treaty of Versailles," Sat.,
Jan. 13, East Council Room,
Rackham Bldg., 9 a.m. Chairman,
R. H. Fifield.
Doctoral Examination for Wil-
liam Merritt Beaney, Jr., Politi-
cal Science; thesis: "The Right
to Counsel in American Courts,"
Sat., Jan. 13, West Council Room,
Rackham Bldg., 9:30 a.m. Chair-
man, H. M. Dorr.
(Continued on Page 5)
.I

Conflicts and Irregular.. ....................Fri.,

These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflicts must be arranged
for by the instructor of the "special" class.

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday;
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at 8 ................................Wed., Jan.
at 9..............................Sat., Jan.
at 10................................Tues., Jan.
at l1........................ Mon., Jan.
at 1 ..............................Tues., Jan.
at 2..............................Thurs., Feb.
at 3... ...........Thurs., Jan.;
at 8............................Fri., Jan.;
at 9..............................Mon., Jan.
at 10...............................Wed. Jan.
at -11...........................Tues., Jan.
at 1...............................Thurs.,Feb.
at 2. ...................... . .....nThurs., Jan.
at 3.. ...nI g ........................M on., Jan.:

SPECIAL PERIODS
Chemistry 1, 3, 21 ........................ Mon.,
Sociology 51, 54, 90 ........................Wed.,
Political Science 1 ........................Wed.,
Speech 35 ............................... Fr.,.
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54.....................Fri.,
English 1, 2............................Sat.,
Psychology 31 ............. ...............Sat.,
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62, 153 ..........Mon.,
Speech 31, 32 .............................Mon.,
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.....................Tues.,
German 1, 2, 11, 31 .........................Tues.,
Russian 1 ................................Tues.,
Zoology 1 ........................Wed.,

Jan. 22,
Jan. 24,
Jan. 24,
Jan. 26,
Jan. 26,
Jan. 27,
Jan. 27,
Jan. 29,
Jan. 29,
Jan. 30,
Jan. 30,
Jan. 30,
Jan. 31,

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individua4 examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in
any unit of the University. For time and place of examinations,
see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as ny necessary
changes will be indicated 'on the School bulletin board.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
JANUARY 22 to FEBRUARY 2, 1951
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of the first
quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned
examination periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulletin
board outside of Room 32.09 East Engineering Building between
January 8 and January 13 for instruction. To ,avoid misunder-
standings and errors each student should receive notification from
his instructor of the time and place of his appearance in each
course during the period January 22 to February 2.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of
the Classification Committee.

24,
27,
30,
22,
23,
1,
25,
26,
29,
31,
23,
1,
25,
22,

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

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Feb. 2, 9-12

Sixty-First Year
d Edited and managed by students of
f the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
1r Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
f Jim Brown............Managing Editor
. Paul Brentlinger.........t-City Editor
CRoma Lipsk~y,........ Editorial Director
Dave Thomas............ Feature Eidtor
.Janet Watts.......... Associate Editor
1 Nancy By an........Associate Editor
.fames Gregory........Associate hditor
Bill Connolly............Sports Editor
SBob San dell-., Associate Sports Editor
Bill Brenton.... Associate Sports Editor
1 Barbara .fans........Women's Editor
.1 Pat Brownson Associate Women's Editor
1-
- Business Staff
yBob Daniels ......... Business Manager
, Walter Shapero Assoc. Business Manager
Pau Schaible....Advertising Manager
Bob Mersereau........Finance Manager
f Carl Breitkreitz....Circulation Manager
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication
of all news dispatches credited to it or'

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tues day at
Chem. 1, 3;

8..............................W ed., Jan.
9..............................Sat., Jan.
10 ..............................Tues., Jan.
11...........................'...Mon., Jan.
1 .................. ...4.......Tues., Jan.;
2.......... ..................Thurs., Feb.
3. ...................... ..Thurs., Jan.
8. .............................Fri., Jan.
9..............................-Mon., Jan.'
10....................Wed., Jan.
11 .............................Tues., Jan.
1..............................Thurs., Feb.
2.............. ................Thurs.,Jan.

24,
27,
30,
22,
23,
1,
25,
26,
29,
31,
23,
1,
25,
22,
22,
24,
26,
27,
29,
30,
31,
2,

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IDRAMA

3 .. . . . . 2....................Mon.,
C. E. 21, 22 ............*Mon.,

,'

M. P. 3, 5, 6, 9, 115; Chem Met. 1 ..........*Wed.,
Econ. 53, 54........................... -Fri.,
C. E. 1, 2, 4; Drw. 3: Eng. 11; M. E. 136 ..... .*Sat.,
Draw. 2; E. E. 5, 160; French .............*Mon.,
E. M..1, 2: M. E. 82; Span., Germ..........Tues.
Draw. 1; M. E. 135; Phys. 45 ............Wed.,
Conflicts and Irregular ....................Fri.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb .

BILL OF ONE-ACTS by University stu-
dents and other people. Produced by the
Speech Department.
TWO STUDENT-WRITTEN plays top the
semester's second bill of one-act plays
which closes its two-day run tonight at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
To say that the student efforts top the
bill is perhaps untrue in the strictest sense,
for neither "The Woods Are Still" by Dan
Waldron nor "Boke's Friends" by Shelton
Murphy is as satisfying as the two "pro-
fessional" items, "Aria Da Capo" by Edna
St. Vincent Milay and "Wurzel-Flummery"
by A. A. Milne.
The Waldron and Murphy plays have a
special distinction, however, which enables
them to take precedence in this review,

is a new policy in the selection of speech
department productions.
The better of the two is Waldron's psy-
chological study of a young wife who is
being driven to insanity by a lonely exist-
ence in a forest cabin. The author has con-
structed a tightly-knit action which main-
tains its 'tension to the end. The players
could have done better by him, however, as
they frequently seemed self-conscious and
perhaps a trifle unsure of their parts.
.* * ,, .
"BOKE'S FRIENDS" is a Saroyanesque
piece about a shoe shine boy who wants
to "belong." It gets a better deal from the
cast but lacks the depth of Waldron's ef-
fort and the ending is contrived. Both,
however, are very worthwhile theatre and

Near Eastern Studies 101, An- All rights of republication of all other
cient History and Civilizations, matters herein are also reserved.
will not meet Fri., Jan. 22. Term Entered at the Post Office at Ann
papers will be accepted at the de- Arbor, Michigan as second-class mail
matter.
partmental office. Subscription during regular school
Make-up exam for Geology 12: year: by carrier, $6.00; by mail, $7.00.

Evening, 12 o'clock, and "Irregular" classes may use any of
the periods marked (*) provided there is no conflict. The final

period on February
be used.

2 is available in case no earlier period can
f

t

BARNABY
Barnaby,
this must
be murder,
at least!

See how we private
operatives arrive at
the scene right off?
In time to erase the
I. .-.- ,

-Then, instead of
calling the police,
we move the body-

There's nobody here! O'Malley! A
Only Gus the Ghost- hideous face.
peered in at
That's the window-

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