100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 12, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

ON THE SPOT
By BILL CONNOLLY
Daily Sports Editor

HERE AND THERE with past and present Wolverines:
Now that he's concluded his collegiate football career with an
outstanding Rose Bowl performance, ,two professional coaches are
deeply interested in Michigan's ace passer, CHUCK ORTMANN .. .
They are Paul Brown of the Cleveland Browns and George Halas of
the Chicago Bears. Both, incidentally, think-he's potential T-formation
material ... Even though he's worked neither under a T nor as a
quarterback, either of these pro coaches are reportedly anxious to
convert him to quarterback to fit him into their famed T-formation
attacks.
At the recent Rose Bowl game, Brown said: "I haven't seen
a college passer with the wrist action that Ortmann has in a
longtime . . . that's all I care aout. A boy who can flip passes
like he can . . that's what I'm looking for. The rest is up to
me, and I'm primarily a teacher .. I can teach him the rest of
it. If he's smart enough to maintain high grades at Michigan,
he certainly could absorb the details of quarterbacking."
Says Halas: "Ortmann is tall, quick, he cap throw and he's also
big enough and strong enough to be a real threat as a runner. He'd
be very valuable as a T-quarterback in our system."
Halas also likes 1950 captain AL WAHL as a tackle or a guard.
L either player, however, has ye- expressed any interest in pro ball.
* * * *
NCLUDING THE 1951 Rose Bowl victory, MICHIGAN GRID TEAMS
In the past 10 years have won 172 games, lost 17 and tied four,
scoring 2,176 points to 801 for opponents.
DON McEWEN, the Wolverines' famed distance runner, came
up with this one on the Rose Bowl trip, as the football team viewed
the Grand Canyon on the return journey. Standing on the brink of
the mighty chasm, McEwen gazed thoughtfully into its mile-deep
depths for several minutes.
"What do you think of it, Don?" he was asked.
"What a spot for used razor blades!" he cracked.
* * * *
FORMER TACKLE for Morningside College at Sioux City, Iowa,
University President ALEXANDER G. RUTHVEN, viewed the
New Year's Day game with great interest. He was making his first
trip to the Rose Bowl this year and added high praise for WAHL and
tackle TOM JOHNSON.
"I watched them every minute and I thought they were lagni-
ficent," he said.
* * * *
HAPPIEST PERSON to return from the Rose Bowl trip was MRS.
DELMAS OOSTERBAAN, wife of the Michigan football coach ...
"Now BENNIE will start eating again and he won't be pacing the
floor at 3 a.m., unable to sleep, and both of us will be able to regain
some of the weight we lost."
* * * *
370 M HARMON, former Wolverine All-American has made as many
as 17 radio and TV shows a week in Los Angeles... Hardworking
Tom is as slender as he was during the height of his playing career
and except for a receding hairline and some gray about the temples
he looks fit enough to step on the gridiron today .. . his wife, Elyse
Knox of the movies is reportedly his severest critic. He does much of
his rehearsing at home with the wife giving him constructive criticism
* * * *
fERHAPS THE BIGGEST FAVORITE of the Michigan Rose Bowl
football squad on their tour of the Hollywood studios was Bing
Crosby . . . Bing took time out during the middle of a picture he
was shooting with Jane Wyman to converse with the players. . . .
another favorite was Bob Hope, who wisecracked blithely with them.
Incidentally, for disappointed ticket-seekers, Hope applied for 20
tickets and wound up with four on the 20-yard line. "OK," he said,
"with my elbows I need two. for myself and I'd like to take a couple
of friends." ... The Press Arrangements Committee, headed by Randy
Richards of the Pasadena Athletic Club, did one of the finest jobs
imaginable-making for a truly unforgettable trip.

aM
Wolverines
Out to Extend
Win Streak
Two roaring express trains in
the form of the Montreal Cara-
bins and the Michigan Wolverine
hockey squads will meet head on
tonight at the Michigan Coliseum
in the first of a two game week-
end series.
Tonight's game as well as Sat-
urday's contest will commence at
the usual 8:00 p.m. starting time.
Capacity crowds are expected to
jam the Wolverine ice palace for
the renewal of the heated Mon-
treal series.
* * *
THUS FAR this season the Wol-
verines have gone through nine
games without a loss while the
high flying Frenchmen possess an
unblemished record with a win
skein of six games.
Tending the goal for the visitors
will be Marcel Auger, who is
spending his sixth collegiate sea-
son in the nets. Auger is in his
second season at Montreal and
previously he played for the Uni-
versity of Ottawa for four cam-
paigns.
CANADIAN COLLEGES are al-
lowed to use both graduate and
freshmen students.
Protecting Auger will be stout
and rugged defensemen George
Veniere and Ray Garriepy. The
probable first line for the Cara-
bins will be composed of cen-
ter Ray "Peanuts" Flynn and
wings Andre Charest and Vic
Marchessault.
Eddie May's return will bolster
the defense which has been oper-
ating with but three men since
the season's opener with the Auto
Club. Another bright spot for the
Wolverines is in the nets where
H4l Downes holds forth with a
much greater degree of confidence
as a result of his fine work in
recent games.
To beat the Wolverines the
Carabins must stop Heyliger's
first line of Neil Celley, Gil Bur-
ford, and John Matchefts, which
have dented the twine for 34 goals
in nine games.
In addition to this trio, the
Maize and Blue possesses a dis-
tinct scoring threat in John Mc-
Kennell, who has flashed the red
light 15 times.

icksters

Meet

Tough

* * * *

____

CONFERENCE OPENER:
Wrestlers Face Strong Indiana Team

Gurubins

12,

4

* *

Michigan's varsity wrestling
team will open its Big Ten sche-
dule here Saturday night against
a rugged Indiana squad.
The Wolverines boast two im-
pressive victories over Toledo, 22-
8, and over a surprisingly strong
Pittsburgh aggregation, 16-11.
* * *
THIS WILL BE the first regu-
lar meet forthe Hoosiers. How-
ever, they swamped an under-
manned Arkansas State team in
their only practice meet.
I n d i a n a which finished
eighth in the Conference Cham-
pionship Meet last year, has
only four returning lettermen.
They are Harry Arthur at 123,
Dave Miller at 130, Russell Kel-
lerat at 167, and Charles Hur-
ley in the heavyweight division.
Arthur lost only one dual match
last year, but was unable to com-
pete in the Big Ten Champion-
ship Meet because of a knee in-
jury. Junior, Phil Thrasher, who
also wrestles at 123, will probably
be used at 114 pounds when that
optional class is wrestled.
* * *
MILLER, who has held down a
varsity slot for the last two sea-

HARD CHECKER-Defenseman George Vernier is one of the
Montreal University pucksters to face the Michigan Wolverines
tonight.

SouthPro poses Sanity Code Change

DAVE MILLER
. . . Hoosier veteran
* * *
sons, has shown considerable im-
provement so- far this year.
Coach Charley McDaniel will
have to depend upon compara-
tively inexperienced material in
the middle weight divisions.
He will go along with Richard
Wilder, who competed in only one
match last year, in the 137 pound
class and Ray Reason, who has
had no previous varsity experience
at 147.
A TOTALLY inexperienced sop-
homore, Charley Thbmpson, will
probably start in the 157 pound
division.
However, McDaniel will be ab-
le to count upon veterans in the
heavier weight classes.
Russ Keller and Tom Wollen-
weber will undoubtedly see acti9n
in the 167 and 175 pound divisions.
* * *
THE HEAVYWEIGHT starter
hasn't been decided upon as yet,
but it will be either letterman

Chuck Hurley or mammoth sopho-
more, Joe Matesic, who carries 245
pounds on his 6-5 frame.
Veterans Dave Space, Captain
Bill Stapp, and Bud Holcombe will
pace Michigan in the middleweight
classes.
Montreal Halts
Chicago,_4 -
MONTREAL --(AP)-- Montreal's
improving Canadiens ran their win
streak to three games last night,
trouncing Lynn Patrick's Chicago
Blackhawks, 4-1.
The Canadiens thus moved into
undisputed possession of third
Bradley Upset
NEW YORK--P)-Bradley's
15-game winning streak was
snapped by St. Johns of Brook-
lyn last night. The Redmen
handed the Uo. 1 collegiate
cage team in the country their
first defeat of the season, 68 to
59, in the feature of a double-
header at Madison Square Gar-
den.
place in the NHL, behind Detroit
and Toronto.
Both the Red Wings and the
Leafs were idle last night.
Meanwhile, restauranteurs in
Detroit were searching feverishly
to match the so-called "magic po-
tion" which has been supposedly
responsible for the recent upsurge
of the lowly New York Rangers.

DALLAS - () - The various
group in the National Collegiate
A.. A. which oppose the sanity code
pooled forces yesterday to take the
Tickets on Sale
For Hockey Tilt
Hockey tickets for both Fri-
day and Saturday night games
with the University of Mon-
treal will be on sale today at
the Athletic Administration
Building. The ticket offices will
be open from 8:30 a.m. till
noon and from 1:00 p.m. to
4:30 p.m.
Student price will be 60 cents
with an I.D. card. Reserve
seats are sold out; however,
over 3,000 general admission
seats are available for each
night.
association out of the law-enforce-
ment business.
Under the leadership of the

S o u t h e r n, Southeastern and
Southwest Conference,, most of
the major collegiate groups except
the Big Ten and Pacific Coast
Conferences agreed to support one
constitutional amendment which
would take away most of the as-
sociation's regulatory powers.
. * *
THIS MOVE will be made at
the opening business session of the
convention tomorrow afternoon.
Basically, the c o n f e r e n c e
members agreed that the present
code had not worked out suc-
cessfully and a return to insti-
tutional control is preferable.
A compromise which would leave
certain restrictions on recruiting
in the constitution brought the
powerful eastern group of colleges
into the coalition.
The joint meeting, sponsored by
Southern groups, also was at-
tendedby representatives of the
Big Seven, Missouri Valley, East-
ern and other conferences. It was
agreed that they will attempt to

put the amendment into the con-
vention floor as soon as possible
Meanwhile, the National Col-
legiate Track Coaches Associa-
tion recommended to the NCAA
that freshmen be allowed to par-
ticipate in varsity athletics for
"the duration of the emergency."
It was the second group of the
NCAA to recommend return of
wartime eligibility rules. The
baseball coaches Wednesday ask-
ed that freshmen be made eligible
starting in the spring.

Charles, Oma Tangle Tonight

PORTRAIT
Photography
FRAMES
for Photographs

NEW YORK - VP) - Ezzard
Charles, improving with every
start, rules a solid 1 to 5 choice
to whip tricky Lee Oma tonight
at Madison Square Garden in the
sixth defense of his world heavy-
weight title.
The determined c h a m p i o n,
sharp and ready at 184 pounds, fi-

gures to unhinge the clownish!
Oma within the 15-round limit,
perhaps around the eighth. The
scant betting action c e n t e r s
around Lee's chances of going the
route. It's about 9 to 5 he won't.
New-found respect for the 29-
year-old Charles after his victory
over Joe Louis is reflected at the
gate. It won't be a sellout but the
International Boxing Club expects
about 12,000 fans and $65,000. Mil-
lions will follow the bout on tele-
vision and radio. Ring time is 10
p.m. (EST).
IKEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR

a
Idg.

a /me uJ
208 Michigan Theater BI
Ph. 2-2072

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I I

(Continued from Page 21
boys and girls, located at Steu-
ben, Michigan, will be at the
Bureau of Appointments, Fri.,
January 12, 1-4 p.m., to inter-
view ,cabin counselors; experienc-
ed waterfront head; NRA licens-
ed riflery instructor; sailing and
boating counselor;doutpost trip
specialist; camp doctor; dental
student; and registered nurse. For
appointment call University ex-
tension 2614.
Teaching Positions in Hawaii:
The Department of Public In-
struction, Honolulu, Hawaii an-
nounced they will have one hun-
dred and fifty vacancies for'
teachers on the pre-school-pri-
mary and elementary levels for
the 1951-52 school year. Second-
ary openings will be nil with the
possible exceptions of such fields
as Music, Commercial, and Voca-
tional Agriculture. Applicants
must have a minimum of eight-
een hours in Education, and
practice teaching. Only citizens
of the United States will be em-
ployed. For further information
and application blanks call at the
1 Bureau of Appointments, Room
3528, Administration Bldg.
Bureau 'of Appointments:
University of the Witwaters-
rand, Johannesburg, Union of
South Africa announces the fol-
lowing vacancies:
1) Professor of Philosophy--
Head of Dept.
(2) Professor of Local Govern-
(2) Senior Lecturer in the Dept.
SRead Daily Classifieds

of Local Gov't. and Public Ad-
ministration.
For further information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments,
Room 3528 Administration Bldg.
Bureau of Appointments:
Dept. of Defense-Armed Forces
Information and Education Div.,
Washington 25, D.C. needs civil-
ian elementary teachers for duty
in U.S. Qualifications are: 30-50
yrs., bachelor's degree with ma-
jor or minor in elementary edu-
cation, and 3 years teaching ex-
perience. Male civilian instruct-
ors qualified to teach at high
school level are needed in the Far

16 and 17. A representative from
the Marathon Paper Company,
Menasha, Wisconsin will be in-
terviewing mechanical, chemical,
industrial, and electrical engi-
neers, chemists, and business ad-
ministration majors for their
training program. Tuesday, Jan.
16. A representative from the Ceco
Steel Products, Chicago, will be
interviewing civil. mechanical,
industrial, and architectural en-
gineers for their sales training
program. February graduates on-
ly.
Tuesday, Jan. 16. A representa-
tive from the Union Life Insur-
ance Company will be interview-
ing for sales positions in the De-
troit area.
Thurs., Jan. 18. A representa-
tive from the Hughes Aircraft
Company, Culver City, California,

will be interviewing electrical en-
gineers and physicists with M.S.
or Ph.D. degree and who will be
graduating in February or June.
For further information and
appointmentsafor interviews call
at the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Bldg.
The York Corporation, York,
Pennsylvania, manufacturers of
refrigerating and air condition-
ing equipment, have announced
their annual College Graduate
Training Program. Positions for
which the company employs col-
lege graduates are in the engi-
neering division, manufacturing
division, sales division and con-
troller's division. For application
blanks and further information
call at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg.
The City of Detroit Civil Serv-

ice Commission, announces the
following examinations: Cadet
Civil Engineer and Survey In-
strument Man. The date for fil-
ing applications extends to Mar.
30. The examination date is daily.
Any citizen of the United States
is eligible to apply for Cadet Civil
Engineer. The residence rule is
waived.
The City of Detroit Civil Serv-
ice Commission announces an ex-
amination for Student Technical
Assistant. Applications may be

filed until Jan. 26. The examina-
tion date is Feb. 2. Applicants for
this position and for Survey In-
strument Man must have been
residents of the City of Detroit
for at least one year immediately
prior to the date of filing appli-
cation, excepting those formerly
in the service. Application blanks
for all three examinations may
be obtained at the Detroit Civil
Service Commission, 16th floor,
Water Board Bldg., 735 Randolph
St., Detroit -26.
For further information con-
(Continued on Page 4)

ANN ARBOR
CUT RATE
113 S. Main

r

I-

Crew-cuts Flat Tops
New Yorker

9 Hairstylists - No Waiting
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

11

A,

I

1 2

Il

East Command. For
formation contact the
Appointments, Room
ministration Bldg.
Bureau of Appointmen
The following com
be interviewing Vt th
Appointments: Monda
and Wednesday, Jan
representative from1
delphia Naval Shipya
interviewing naval ar
types of engineers, che
sicists, and mathemat
B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. d
who will be graduatin
ary, June or August.
Tuesday and Wedn
"Keep A-Head of Y
SPECIALTI
Personality C
Cuts
The New Yor
THE DASCOLA B
Liberty near S

further in-

r

.

eBureau of
3528, Ad-
la
nts:
Lpanies will M
e Bureau of
y, Tuesday,
. 15-17. A N
the Phila-
ard will be
chitects, all
emists, phy-
icians, with
degrees and
g in Febru-
esday, Jan.
our Hair"
ES
rew
(A
rk r
ARBERS k
tate
a.
I>

7 a V a 7 -a o a 7 8 '7 + 7 7a a ^: 7 T 7 0 V 7 7 7
14
4 l4
a'a
"Serving Ann Arbor Half a Century"
We re
-9 '
HAPPYb
to please you
with our
CHICKEN
IN THE BASKET M
with French Fries
and Hot Biscuits . . ... .
SEA FOOD CUBE STEAK

i
sue.
i
j
A
:
' .

Shirts Only
17c
in our
STUDENT BUNDLE

Front
Zipper
Sanforized

I

I

I

ALL CLOTHING LAUNDERED, FLUFF DRIED, AND NEATLY FOLDED.
4 POUNDS.MINIMUM.., . . . . . . . ... . . . ...+. .12.50c
EACH ADDITIONAL POUND....."" .." .s.. "...M".....1+2C

HANDKERCHIEFS, each additional..............
SOCKS, pair, each additional. . .. . . . . ... . . . . .

3c
3c

r

.mMranr

I 0 DISCOUNT on LAUNDRY
% DISCOUNT on DRY CLEANING

9 eat IVEU
YOU CAN DRIVE THROUGH

'

U

CASH and CARRY

I

I El U mm ff AIin

I 'A Ag-oMnow

N1



I1

.

MWTIF M , M"WAZIET"L - A,"I", I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan