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December 20, 1950 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1950

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ I

...............

-_

The
City Editor's
SCRATCH
PAD
]RESIDENT TRUMAN'S recent proclama-
tion of a national emergency has remov-
ed any remaining illusions which we may
have had about living normal, peacetime
lives in the post-World War II era.
These illusions began shortly after that
war ended, and they stuck around for a
long time. But while they existed, many of
us were aware, subconsciously at least, that
all was not well with the world. We had
the feeling that peaceful normalcy was de-
sirable and attractive, but not completely
practical.
We disbanded our armed forces, because
it was politically more expedient to do so.
After all, it can't be denied that most people
prefer the comforts of civilian homes to the
rigors of the military routine.
Shortly after we did this, the Iron Curtain
was extended over most of Eastern Europe.
But because we enjoyed our peaceful ways
so much, we did little or nothing toward re-
building our armed might. We were con-
tent to enjoy normalcy, even though inter-
national affairs were far from normal. Of
course, there was some questions about
whether it was morally right that the Soviet
sphere of influence should expand so much.
However, if we thought about this very much,
we found that our peaceful existence was
disturbed, so most of us ignored the impli-
cations of the events of the day.

THOMAS L. STOKES:
Tighter Anti-Trust Law

" "We're Fighting, Too, Fellows!"

* '

OUR EARLY REVERSES in Korea shook
us out of our dream world, to some ex-
tent. The draft was put into operation again,
members of the reserves became alertly ner-
vous, and a few more people began to realize
what might face us.
Then we began to win the war in Ko-
rea. We also were confronted with an im-
portant election at home. The draft con-
tinued to move at a relatively slow pace,
and reservists started to breath more ea-
sily. Even though we knew that millions
of Chinese Reds were likely to rush into
the skirmish, we pretty much ignored
them. We were-winning a brilliant victory,
weren't we?
But now there is no ekcuse for dreaming.
There, is no excuse -for illusions. It is ap-
parent that the Communists will not be
satisfied until they efentually control the
world. They have a good start toward their
goal now.
Thus, we now face the prospect of full
mobilization. This, of course, is not pleasant.
It means that most of our plans for a plea-
sarit, peaceful future are likely to be areams,
at least for a while. We can face this un-
pleasant prospect only if we have courage-
courage which comes from faith in the
moral rightness of our way of life. We have-
n't had to have that kind of courage for a"
long time. But without it in these days, there
can be little hope that we can ever return
to the peace and normalcy which we desire.
-Paul Brentlinger
Editorials Published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff,
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: RON WATTS

WASHINGTON-Congress at long last has
closed up a loophole in the Clayton Anti-
Trust Act which has been used to bring
about corporation mergers that have lodged
control of American business and industry
in fewer and fewer hands.
While this action comes late, almost too
late, nevertheless it is timely. For we are
in the midst of another industrial mo-
bilization, and opportunity for giant cor-
porations to gobble up smaller, indepen-
dent businesses. That has happened at an
alarming rate since the second world war.
The Clayton Act was put on the books
during the Woodrow Wilson administration
to strengthen the 180 Sherman Anti-Trust
Act. But smart corporation lawyers quickly
found a way around its section 7, which pro-
hibited purchase of stock of one company
by another where that would be monopolis-
tic in effect. They invented, instead, the de-
vice of merger through purchase of assets,
a procedure upheld by the Supreme Court.
President Hoover, Roosevelt and Truman
have urged closing of this loophole.
That now has been done by banning mer-
ger through assets purchase in the Kefau-
ver-O'Mahoney Bill passed by the Senate
this week, 55 to 22. It passed the House
previously and, after adjustment of differ-
ences between House and Senate forms, the
measure will go to President Truman, for
his signature.
*s *
MONOPOLY IS GENERALLY regarded as
a dull subject for the average citizen.
To the contrary, it has a very close and vital
interest. Monopoly closes the door to the in-
dividual enterprise and initiative. These
qua]li ies have made ours a thriving indus-
trial democracy. Monopoly paralyzes them.
Monopoly reaches down to all of us, for it
affects the cost and quality of the products
we all use.
There is a still more insidious danger
which is directly involved in the crisis our
democracy faces today. This is the power
industrial and financial monopoly confers
upon a few in our society. Historically, such
power has been used to control the po-
litical government and if the trend in con-
centration continues our nation "will sure-
ly sink into some form of collectivism-
fascism, socialism or communism," as Sen-
Phoenix Drive
THE STUDENT Phoenix drive has re-
ceived pledges for more than $131,000.
As student fund-raising campaigns go
this is a very good showing. In fact many
people outside of the University have ex-
pressed surprise at the amount.
But this total has come from about
25 per cent of the student body. From
this aspect the student drive has been
a failure.
No one expects student donations to
the project to put the drive over the
top. This will be done by alumni and
special gifts from corporations such as
GM and Nash.
It should be remembered, however,.
that the Phoenix Project was born in
the minds of students. Its success still
depends on student support. Without
this, the whole campaign stands to
fall apart. If Phoenix is to be a success
there is a need for much more student
participation.
Today is the last day of the student
drive. It is the last chance students will
have to aid in making Phoenix a success.
-Vernon Emerson.

ator O'Conor (D., Md.) put it during
Senate debate.
This danger was also defined very aptly
during the debate by Senator Aiken (R.,
Vt.) in posing the question as to why it is
important to prevent concentration of busi-
ness in a few hands. He answered:
"It is important for the same reason that
it is important to prevent the concentration
of political power. The United States already
has gone too far along both roads."
He pointed out that we are fighting today
for the survival of democracy. We have kept
our position as the citadel of democracy,
he said, because "in this country more op-
portunity has been vested in the hands of
a few. The only way we can defeat Com-
munism, he explained, is by example, by
making democracy work here.
If, he said, "we permit economic mo-
nopolies to be formed and permit the con-
centration of power in the hands of a
few, with a resultant economic dependence
on the part of the many, we shall have
failed to maintain our example of democ-
racy before the world."
SENATORS O'Conor, O'Mahoney (D.,
Wyo.) and Kefauver (D., Tenn.) illus-
trated in case after case the hastening trend
toward concentration which today finds one-
tenth of one percent of corporations con-
trolling 49 percent of the total assets of all
corporations.
It is fortunate that Congress finally has
acted to try to check this trend and in
time, we hope, to prevent the exploitation
of our present national crisis, as others have
been exploited, in a way that eventually will
undermine the democracy which we are now
trying to save.
(Copyright, 1950, by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)
Election
Miscount
THE RECOUNT is over and a governor
has been elected.
But the results should bring forth no
rejoicing from any quarters. As a matter
of fact, the election was downright re-
volting.
In an era which constitutes the greatest
test yet put to democracy, the calamity
brought about by pseudo-official ballot-
counters stands as a dark blotch on the en-
deavors of freedom. The single vote as a
determinant of the quality of governmental
policy has been proven to be a kindergarten
fairy tale.
The power of the individual is the one
basic tenant which we have to defeat the
forces of Communism. When it goes, civili-
zation goes too.
The propaganda potential of the Michi-
gan mess is tremendous and will increase as
similar electoral tragedies are found
throughout the United States.
Perhaps the negligence in this state
will point up a national need for a
thorough investigation of electoral ma-
chinery. It is very unlikely that this state
and this year stand alone in erroneous
mathematics, more likely that the close
election brought a wide-spread weakness
into the spotlight.
At any rate, it would have been small
comfort for the free people of Michigan to
wake up on Nov. 8 and find colored oleo-
margarine sitting in the governor's chair-
which wasn't so terrifically far from reality.
--Barnes Connable.

Commun ique
GENERAL MACARTHUR has been doing a
lot of writing recently. Most of it has
been in defense of himself against suspicions
and charges that he exceeded his authority
in Korea. This is understandable, but still
one wonders how a man who is mastermind-
ing an army that is being defeated has
time to worry sa much about such things.
The wonder takes on a bit of an edge when
one remembers that, though General Mac-
Arthur appeared personally in Korea to
preside over the "kickoff" of the drive that
was supposed to bring the Korean war to
a conclusion, he has since then been operat-
ing in Tokyo.
General MacArthur's most recent com-
munication to private persons in the Unit-
ed States is of a different nature, how-
ever. He sent a message to the command-
ers of four veterans' organizations who
asked President Truman to authorize Gen-
eral MacArthur to use "every means" of
hitting back at the Chinese Communists.
In it he expressed his "profound gratitude."
Even if this was just a pleasantry it would
seem to be the kind of thing that the com-
mander of United Nations forces in Korea
would be too busy to get around to doing.
But it was far more than a pleasantry.

")ji.l)
DN TO FiI
19U,'
.+ PO IIC=

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTh
JANUARY 22 to FEBRUARY 2, 1951
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
for courses having recitations only, the time of the class is the
time .of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be exam-
med at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12
o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes and other "irregu-
lar" classes may use any examination period provided there is no
conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are arranged for by
the "irregular" class). A final examination period is available for
"irregular" classes which are unable to utilize an earlier period.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the.Arts, no date of examination may be
changed without the consent of the Committee on Examinations.
TIME OF CLASS TIME OF' EXAMINATION

Xeter4TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
and in good taste: Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited or withheld from publication at the discretion of the
editors.

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday,
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8........... ... ... .... ....W ed., t
9..................................Sat.,
10......., . ,................. . Tues.,
...... ......" ..............Mon.,t
...........................Thurs.,
3. .."........,............ .... Thurs.,,
8_..............................Fri.,
9. ................ ..Fo.,
10..............................Wed.,
11................. ............Tues.,
1.............................Thurs.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.

24,
27,
30,
22,
23,
1,
25,
26,
29,
31,
23,
1,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5

2..............................Thurs., Jan. 25, 9-12
3.. ........................Mon., Jan. 22, 2- 5

Women's Page

. .

To the Editor:
WOMEN'S PAGE stories are
ludicrous enough without the
interjection of the whimsical (?)
nonentities that appear under the
banal title "It's a Gay Life."
In past weeks we have been
treated to illuminating articles
about the press box in Yost Field
House, Ann Arbor climate, pom-
poms at football games, and liv-
ing in a triple room before a
formal dance.
James Thurber, Cornelia Otis
Skinner, and others prove that
common everyday occurences can'
be turned into refreshing reading
by a skillful writer.
But "It's a Gay Life" is spun
too thinly ever to convince anyone
of its being good journalism, or
even worthwhile realding.
The two young ladies' glimpses
into "interesting" phases of col-
lege life appear as girly-girly,
amateurish and juvenile.
These articles contrast oddly in
their naivete with.the rest of the
pseudo-sophisticated ,women's
page.
After seeing the typical wom-
en's page copy we feel that we
have, cause to believe that the
main object of all the fol-de-rol is
to take up the space left over
after the advertising has been ex-
hausted. . . . surely not to provide
reading matter.
The women's page as an integral
part of The Daily has a respon-
sibility to its subscribers.
We feel that the rest of the
paper tries to meet this respon-
sibility, but women's page provides
nothing but dribble . ...and from
now until June would be too long
for such a rainy season.
-Sally Wagner,
Joan Case.
Western Civilization . .
To the Editor:
THEY ARE trying to sell us the
idea that "Western Civiliza-
tion" depends upon victory for
MacArthur and Syngman Rhee,
and Chiang Kai-Shek in the Far
East. "Military, economic or po-
litical destruction of the Western
civilization and our American way
of life are definite possibilities,"
unless Formosa is seized from the
"Communists," and they are kept
out of the United Nations, a New;
York Times military expdrt squeal-
ed hysterically on Dec. 1st. Simi-
larly, President Truman and Mac-
Arthur and the rest are voicing
o; the "threat" to our civilization,=
represented by the struggle in Ko-
rea.
Anyone who has managed 'to
keep his senses amid the great
wave of chaouvinist propaganda
must understand about the strange
topsy-turvey world we are living
in.

blasting and burning great masses
of human beings? In the Far East!
Not one single Far Eastern gun
has been shot off or threatened
against the soil of "Western Civili-
zation."
Where are the lands and waters
seized by us for military and naval
bases, for us as unsinkable air-
craft carriers with which to bomb
Far and Wide?. In the Far East.
The ruling circles views of West-
ern Civilization has nothing in
common with the civilization of
the great American and European
peoples, for whom 'there can be no
peace and no security in a world
which rests upon super exploita-
tion and, bondage for the vast mass
of people throughout the world.
This civilization is rapidly grow-
ing weaker and weaker ;as the
people of the Far East rise up to
knock off the chains, of colonial
and feudal oppression.
Yet, it is the great mass of
American and European people
who. are being forced to defend
this Western Civilization of eco-
nomic oppression and degradation
with their lives and the lives of
thei~r sons, and sweat and blood
and economic sacrifices and above
all, with the danger of mass atom-
ic destruction, on a scale we can-
not even imagine hanging over
them.
-George Paul Moskoff
c~1 4,
;Mib galt :1 I

Conflicts and Irregular.....................Fri., Feb. 2, 9-12
These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflicts must be arranged
for by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS

I

A,

a

Chemistry 1, 3, 21 ..................... .'.Mon.,
Sociology 51, 54, 90 .......................Wed.,
Political Science 1 ........................ Wed.,
Speech 35 ......... ..................Fri..
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54 ....................Fri.,
English 1, 2 ........ ...................Sat.,
Psycholo y 31..........................Sat.,
French 1 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62, 153 ...... Mon.,
Speech 31, 32..........................Mon.,
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.....................Tues.,
German 1, 2, 11, 31T................... Tues.,
Russian 1 ...................................Tues.,
Zoology 1 .............................Wed.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan..
Jan..
Jan.
Jan.
Jan..
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

22,
24,
24,
26,
26,
27,
27,
29,
29,
30;
30,
30,
31,

2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2. 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in
any unit of the University. For time and place of examinations,
see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
JANUARY 22 to FEBRUARY 2, 1951
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of the first
quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned
examination periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulletin
board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Building between
January 8 and January 13 for instruction. To avoid misunder-
standings and errors each student should receive notification from
his instructor of the time and place of his appearance in each
course during the period January 22 to February 2.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of
the Classification Committee.

.I

A

;I

4

4I

RECORDS

AUSTIN WARREN'S Poetry Recordings
THE EXPERIENCE of poetry too often,
in our times, is purely visual, the "mind's
ear" taking the place of the shaping voice
f poet or reciter. Such private reading is
pound to be a more-or-less restricted ex-
perience. Consequently, even the most
fa'miliai' poem gains when it is heard fresh-
ly, through the medium of another's voice
and interpretation.
There can be no question of the quali-
fications Professor Austin Warren pos-
sesses for thus freshening and vitalizing
poetry. His knowledge, not only of the
individual poem, but of the essentials of
poetry in general, hardly needs publicizing
here. In addition, he has singularly rich
and flexible vocal resources. Altogether,
he is able to convey the subtler shades of
meaning and emotion, and fuse them
with the sounds and rhythms of the verse,
achieving effects that frequently are gen-
uinely illuminating.
The appearance, therefore, of a group of
recordings of English and American poetry,
read by Professor Warren for the Idiom
Recording Company, is well worth noting.
The three Idiom records issued to date in-
clude selections from George Herbert and
Emily Dickinson, Poe and W. S. Gilbert,
and John Crowe Ransom. It is a selection
worthy of the varied talents of the reader,
and Dr. Warren does justice to them. If

Ransom's "Our Two Worthies" is gleefully
irreverent in mood, but its sense is by no
means so irreverent. The purpose of the
poem is to rescue the names of Jesus and
Paul from sentimentality, and restore them
to some kind of dignity, human if not
divine. The purpose can be achieved only
when, as in this reading, balance of tension
between mood and sense is sustained to
the end. The contrast between this poem
and the devotional lyrics of Herbert, and his
success with each, marks the range and
flexibility of Professor Warren's interpretive
skill.
There are other moments of surprise in
these recordings. The rescue of Emily
Dickinson's "I taste a liquor never brewed"
from pejorative association with the 'cute-
ness' of female lyrists after her is not
least among them. Th'e incantatory vir-
tuosity with which the three Poe poems,
especially "For Annie," are read is another
example of restoration to dignity that
sympathetic and critical reading alone,
perhaps, is capable of. The gusty, almost
Biercian macabre of Gilbert's "Gentle
Alice Brown" may or may not appeal to
individual taste-certainly, no reading
could do more for it.
Technically, the recordings vary in ex-
cellence. The Herbert-Dickinson record (12-
inch LP) is freest from flaws, and also the
most durable. It alone is a pressing. The
other two are transcriptions, on acetate

Sixty-First Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Jim Brown ...........Managing Editor
Paul Brentiinger...........City Editor
Roma Lipsky..........Editorial Director
Dave Thomas..........Feature Eidtor
Janet Watts ........... Associate Fditor
Nancy Bylan..........Associate Editor
Jardes Gregory........Associate lditor
Bill Connolly..........Sports Editor
Bob Sandell.... Associate Sports Editor
Bih Brenton....Associate Sports Editor
Barbara Jans........Women's Editor
Pat Brownson Associate Women's Editor
Business Stafff
Bob Daniels .......... Business Manager
Waiter Shapero Assoc. Business Manager
Paul Schaible.... .Advertising Manager
Bob Mersereau.......Finance Manager
Carl Breitkreitz. ....Circulation Manager
Telephone 23-24-1

Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Chem. 1, 3;

8...... .......................W ed., Jan.
9...:.........................Sat., Jan.
10 ................................ Tues., Jan.
11............«..................Mon., Jan.a
1. ............................Tues., Jan.
2........................ ...Thurs.,Feb.
3............... .............Thurs., Jan.
8.. ... .... ...................Fri., Jan.
9........................ Mon., Jan.
10........... ................Wed., Jan.
11. ..........Tues., Jan.
1. .. ................... Thurs., Feb.
2 .. *****. ................:.... .. . .:. Thurs., Jan.

24,
27,'
30,
22,
23,
1,
25,
26,
29,
31,
23,
1,
25,
22,
22,
24,
26,
27,
29,
30,
31,
2,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5-
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5,
9-12

TIME 'OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

/"

j

A

3.............................Mon.,
-C. E. 21, 22 ....................*Mon.,

M. P. 3, 5, 6,9, 115; Chem Met. 1...........*Wed.,
Econ. 53, '54...........................
C. E. 1,2,4; Drw. 3; Eng. 11; M.E. 136..*Sat.,
Draw. 2; E, E. 5, 160; French ............. *Mon.,
E. M. 1, 2; M. E. 82; Span.,Germ..........*Tues.
Draw. 1; M. E. 135; Phys. 45.............*Wed.,
Conflicts and Irregular.................. Fri.,.

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.:
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.

'.f

Where are American, British, Member of The Associated Press
and Turkish and other troops of The Associated Press is exclusively
"Western Civilization," fighting entitled to the use for republication
and destroying? In the Far East! of all news dispatches creditea to it or
Has anyone heard of a single Far otherwise credited to this newspaper.
All rights of republication of all other
Eastern 'soldier on the soil, of matters herein are also reserved.
Western Civilization? But it is Entered at the Post Office at Ann
"Western Civilization" which is Arbor, Michigan as second-class mail
being destroyed. m'atter.
Subscription during regular school
Where are the guns and planes year: by carrier, $6.00; by mail, $7.00.

Evening, 12 o'clock, and "Irregular" classes may use any of
the periods marked (*) provided there is no conflict. The final
period on February 2 is available in case no earlier period can
be used.

.

BARNARY

It's all right to tell your Fairy
Godfather about this Fconreemps
between your parents, Barnaby-
I-

Your promise holds for PEOPLE...A Fairy
Godfather is something else again, m'boy.
Gosh, maybe you can help, Mr.

Not very enterprising of her. Now your
poor father will have to play golf...
But he can't because '

}.

I

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