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December 20, 1950 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-20

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I PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

} p y D y ,
VEDNESAi, DECEMBER Fro, -1958

PAGE TWO WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1950

DRAMATIZING A JOB:
General Practitioner's
Role in Nation Stressed

Progressive Education

4

'

it I TRANSPORTATION

O4

With an increasing tendency
for young doctors to go into fields
of medical specialization, medical
groups throughout the nation have
become more aware of the job of
dramatizing the role of general
practitioners to young medical
students.
NAmong the leaders in this field
has been the University Medical
School. Their attempted solution
to the problem is a program of
graduate internship in general
practice, established in 1948.
"FOLLOWING the war," Dr.
Harry A. Towsley of the depart-
ment of postgraduate medicine,
asserted, "the lack of general prac-
titioners in rural areas became ev-
ident. The new two year intern-
ship program was developed with
the material aid of the W.K. Kel-
logg Foundation and the Medical
School to answer this need. It was
designed to encourage young men
to practice in the rural areas."
"Because many of our GI stif-
dents were married and had
families, they were anxious to
begin their practice," Dr. Tows-
ley continued.
Although the lack of general
practitioners was felt throughout
the entire country, rural communi-
ties were the hardest hit. Large
numbers of people in these areas
were not covered by medical care
when the older doctors retired and
were not replaced by younger men.
MANY YOUNG men were not
interested in rural positions be-

cause it meant leaving the fine
facilities of metropolitan hospitals
and laboratories for which they
had been trained.
It meant irregular hours, low-
er income and the disadvantages
of rural life, all of which the
urban specialist avoided.
The Medical School's program
has helped in overcoming these
disadvantages for the young medi-
cal student, and at the same time
aided several of the smaller hos-
pitals located throughout the
state.
THE INTERN alternates for six
month periods between the Uni-
versity Hospital and the affiliated
hospitals.
While working in the affiliated
hospital, the intern is under the
direction of the staff which con-
tinues his educational program.
At the same time, the intern is
helping out the small hospital by
making use of the previous med-
ical education he has received.
In time these affiliated hospitals
hope to be able to set up their
own independent internship pro-
grams based on the experience
they receive from training the Un-
iversity interns.
* * *
IN THESE small affiliated hos-
pitals, the intern gets a chance
to observe and diagnose the many
cases that he will encounter in
general practice," Dr. Towsley
said. "He will encounter with reg-
ularity cases of appendicitis, pneu-
monia and others of the common
ailments when they are first
brought to the hospital."
"The intern will also be given
a chance to establish that per-
sonal doctor-patient relation-
ship that is so important," he
remarked.
Dr. Towsley also pointed out
that many of the interns become
attached to the community, and
after their internship has been
completed go back to the locality
to practice-not always at the
same hospital, but in the sur-
rounding area where they could
make use of the hospital facilities.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIEDADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.

WIN A FREE MOVIE TICKET
Look through the Classified ads, if your name is listed in bold
type, just call at The Michigan Daily classified desk and win a
FREE PASS to the State Theatre. Now showing is "DESTINA-
TION'MOON" starring John Archer. (Passes good until Decem-
ber 22, 1950.)

I

i

SCHOOLMASTER AND PUPIL-George Anderson, '51, studies
with Walter Alexander, Grad., his former high school superin-
tendent, in Angell Hall Study Hall in preparation for a history
course in which both are enrolled.
** ** ~
Student Vies with His School
Superintendent in History Class

'U' Musicians
To SoloToday
Student vocalists and instru-
mentalists will take the solo spot-
light at the University Symphony
Orchestra's concert at 8:30 p.m.
today in Hill Auditorium.
The program will be comprised
entirely of concertos and arias in
which the eight soloists chosen
by the faculty of the School of
Music will perform..
Scheduled for the concert are
works by Mozart, Debussy, Sibe-
lius, Brahms, Strauss and Rach-
maninoff.
The soloists that will appear are
pianists Digby Bell, Grad., George'
Exon, '52 SM, Renah LaMed, '51
SM, Bethyne Bischoff, Grad. and
Donald Wyant, '51 SM; sopranoes
Rose Marie Jun, Grad. and Carol
Wilder, Grad. and violinist Theo-
dore Johnson, '51 SM.
invitations Sought
Invitations for foreign students
to visit in Ann Arbor homes dur-
ing the vacation period are being
sought by the International Cen-
ter.
Citizens interested in having
foreign students at their homes
should contact Mrs. Margaret
Mead at the International Center.
Only 4 Shopping Days
Until Christmas

Coincidence went on a rampage
in History 183 class this semester,
as a student found himself seated
beside his old high school superin-
tendent.
Back in 1946, George Anderson,
'51, was handed his high school
diploma by Walter Alexander, then
superintendent of schools in North-
port, Mich.
AND THIS fall, when Alexander
walked into his history lecture, he
found himself seated beside his old
Extend Rose Bowl
Train Ticket Sale
The deadline for reservations on
the Wolverine Club's Rose Bowl
Special has been extended until
4:30 p.m. today.
A limited number of coach and
Pullman reservations can still be
purchased at the Student Affairs
window in the lobby of the Admin-
istration Bldg., according to George
Benisek, '52, club publicity chair-
man. -

schoolmaster, now a classmate in-
stead of a school official.
Alexander, who had been su-
perintendent in Northport for 10
years, is now at the University
seeking his master's degree in
education. He graduated origi-
nally from Ferris Institute.
Besides sitting together in class,
the two are next-door neighbors
back in Northport, a town of 700
at the upper tip of the Lower Pe-
ninsula.
* * *
ANDERSON, however, had not
known that his former superin-
tendent was intending to enroll at
the University this fall. It was
quite a shock when he saw Alex-
ander walk in and sit down be-
side him in September. "Flabber-
gasting," Anderson commented.
The course, taught by Prof. F.
Clever Bald, is on the History of
Michigan. The two are running
neck and neck for scholastic hon-
ors in the subject. Apparently only
the final exam will determine
whether the student can outdo his
ex-schoolmaster.

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Accurate work, reasonable
rates. Will call for and deliver. Call
Marie Schuler 6341. )32B
KIDDIE KARE
Reliable sitters available. Ph. 3-1121.
)10B
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Ser-
vice Company, 215 E. Liberty. Guar-
anteed repair service on all makes of
typewriters. )6B
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist. 308
S. State. Legal, Master, Doctors dis-
sertations, etc. 2-9848 or 2-4228. )12B
WASHING - Finished work and hand
ironing if preferred. Also rough dry
and wet washing. Free pick-up and
delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )1B
TYPING - Accurate wort. reasonable
rates. Phone 3-4040. )3B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales, Rentals, and Service
Morrill's - 314 S. State St. )4B
FOR SALE
DIAMOND engagement and wedding
rings. Large discount. Lee Anger.
wholesale representative. Ph. 2-3481
2:00-5:00. )121
BABY PARAKEETS and mated pairs,
canaries, zebra finches and Java rice
birds. Bird supplies and cages. Mrs.
Ruffins, 562 S. Seventh. )2B
BASS SKI BOOTS, ice skates, size 10.
Practically new $10 each. Phone 3-1060.
)135
8 mm MOVIE CAMERA, Eastman mo-
del 25, case, titler, and tripod, $50.
Ph. 2-9774. )136
CHRISTMAS SPECIALS
Genuine horsehide A-2 Jacket $19.95;
Muton color gabardine jackets, sur-
coat style $14.95; men's rayon robes
$6.88; men's Beacon flannel robes $6.88;
gabardine pants 40% wool, 60% rayon
$7.15. Open till 6 p.m. Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington. )5
- ENSIAN -
$5.00
Be a good guy
AND BUY -
Today
RAYMOND L. CURRAN

FOR SALE

Dazor flexible fluorescent desk lamp.
Retail $27, selling $14. Call 3-8212.
) 137
LADIES cloth coat, very dressy, lynx
fur collar, teel blue. $45. Ph. 2-9774.
)130
- COUSINS --
on State Street
Heavy Ski Sweaters-assorted
designs - $5.95 up. )3
CHRISTMAS Gift Rates on TIME and
LIFE now available. Phone Student
Periodical Agency 2-8242 to order. )2
ROOMS FOR RENT
12 OF DOUBLE for male, one block
southeast of campus. 7330. )68R
TOURIST HOME for Overnight Guests.
Bath, shower, reasonable rates, 518 E
Williams St. Phone 3-8454. )12R
PERSONAL
Christmas Flowers
Plants, corsages, and cut flowers for
Detroit delivery. Ph. 3-1824. 7-11 p.m.
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE )52P
ALAN C. BOYD
GO TO EUROPE IN 1951
Spend 50 glorious days visiting Eng-
land, Holland, Germany, Switzerland,
Italy, Prance. All arrangements
through American Express. VERY
REASONABLE-with all major ex-
penses included. Call or write to Mrs.
Helen Coutts, 9730 W. Outer Drive,
Detroit 23, Mich. KEnwood 2-2320.
)53P
CLUB 211
Available for parties, dances, etc.
Ph. 2-8315. )2P
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
122 E. Liberty Phone 8161 )IP
WESTERNERS
Travel the Wolverine Club Rose Bowl
Special back to school Jan. 5 from
L. A., Salt Lake City, Omaha, and
intermediate points. Further infor-
mation and tickets at Adm. Bldg.,
8-4:30 daily. )39P

PERSONAL
MICHIGAN NIGHT at Frank Dailey's
Meadowbrook. Ralph Flanagan and
his orchestra. Call Ed Gibbon 2-3046
for reservations and information. )40P
WILL GIVE piano lessons. School of
Music senior. Phone 2-8242. )2
COMING HOLIDAY PARTIES
it costs so little to learn to have fun at
RAY HATCH DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State Ph. 5083 )4P
TRANSPORTATION
FLY NORTH AMERICAN to the coast
or Miami. Less than air coach fare.
Phone after 5:30-2-8265 or 25-9083.
)55T
RIDE WANTED-Omaha Neb. Share
expenses. J. M. Smith, Lawyers Club,
3-4145, Fri. or Sat. )69T
NEED RIDE round-trip or one way to
Norfolk, Virginia or vicinity; will
share driving and expenses. Leave
Dec. 22. Call 2-8539 Reuben. )66T
NEED RIDE to Toronto for 1 or 2
December 22-3. Call 3-4129 9 to 5.
) 67T
WANTED--Riders from N.Y.C. to Chi-
cago Dec. 27 to catch Rose Bowl Spe-
cial. Call Ed Gibbon 2-3046. )56T
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.-One rider, round
trip, Xmas vacation. Car uncrowded.
Call Dexter 5501.

LEAVING Dec. 21 in 1950 Studebaker
for San Francisco via 66. Share ex-
pense and driving. 3-1183. )54T
DRIVING to Rose Bowl and return,
Need passengers. No driving required.
Married couple considered. Call Mar-
tai Everitt, 320 Prescott, E. Q. after
9:00 p.m. )68T
ONE RIDER wanted to Boston. Leaving
Fri., Dec. 22. Call 2-2721. )70T
RIDERS WANTED Dec. 22 to St. Louis,
Tulsa, L. A. Straight through. Share
expenses. Call Bob, 2-6754. )71T
HELP WANTED
PHOTOGRAPHER wanted to take J-Hop
pictures. Call Carol Eagle, 2-2569. )49H
HOME ECONOMICS
GRADUATE
Do you want interesting, stimulating
work? If you have ability and train-
ing for:
Recipe testing and writing
Food demonstration work
Meeting the public
Radio work
Answering food questions
Call 2-3136 for appointment. Home
Service Dept., Michigan, Consolidated
Gas Co. )46H
ELIZABETH A. MARES
LOST AND FOUND
KNITTING BOX containing navy owea.
ter and glasses. Christmas present..
Return to or phone Doris Waldecker,
802 Monroe, 2-5184. )141+
LOST-Silver ID bracelet with "Char"
printed on outside. Please take to
Lost & Found or 413 S. Division,
Apt. 5. )16L
LOST-Chrysler wrist-watch. Notify
Jim Amerman, 2-3297. )15L
LOST FRI.-Parker 51 pen. Sentimental
value. Reward. Call Pat 2-5184. )18L
LOST-Hamilton wrist watch, in vicini-
ty of Michigan Daily Building. Please
call 418 Winchell House W. Quad.
2-4401. )17L

j

a

loft0*.w
'CBI~THUST~

t.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

FOR HER
COMPLETE selection of University of
Michigan Jewelry. Haler's Jewelers,
717 N. University Ave. near Hill Audi-
torium.

- COUSINS -
ON STATE STREET
Terry Cloth Robes. A special gift,
that will cause no size problem. Fits
anyone perfectly. Drapes from the
shoulders. $10.95.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the Uni-
versity. Notices should be sentin
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3 p.m. on
the day preceding publication (11 a.-
m. Saturdays).
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 20, 1950
VOL. LXI, No. 73
Notices
Regents' Meeting: Sat., Jan. 20,
at 9 a.m. Communications for
consideration at this meeting
must be in the President's hands
not later than January 11.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Presidents of fraternities are
remindedrthat monthly member-
ship reports for December must
be filed on or before January 5
with the Office of Student Af-
fairs, Room 102., Administration
Bldg.
Twelve o'clock permission for
women students has been author-
ized on the nights indicated for
caroling groups listed below. Ju-
diciary Council requires that the
name of the sponsoring group be
specified on sign out sheets.
December 20 -
Acacia, Arts Chorale, Beta The-
ta Pi-Gamma Phi Beta, Delta Up-
silon, Gamma Delta, Hinsdale
House-Lloyd Hall, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, Lutheran Students' As-
sociation, Mosher Hall-Strauss
House, Newberry Residence, Phi

Gamma Delta-Pi Beta Phi, Phi
Kappa Tau, Phi Sigma Delta,
Phoenix Executive Committee,
Prescott House, Sigma Nu, Theta
Delta Chi, Theta Xi-Alpha Chi
Omega, Yost League House, Zeta
Beta Tau-Sigma Delta Tau,
December 21 --
Chi Phi, Delta Chi, Kappa Del-
ta Annex, Kleinstuck, Jordan
Hall-Strauss House, Mosher Hall-
W e n l e y, Nelson International
House, Stockwell Hall-corridor 45.

Chemical Phenomena
to Bacterial Cytology.

as RelatedI

FOR HIM
CHRISTMAS CARDS, Fountain Pens,
Brief Cases, games, Fluorescent Lamp
with Clock.
Morrill's 314 S. State
FOR HIS CHRISTMAS give him a fine,
all-wool Rugby sweater. Sleeveless,
pullovers and cardigans. $2.95 to
$10.95. Rabideau-Harris, 119 S. Main
St.
NEW' 4'r.OL
"MINIATURE" HEARNG AID
$75
goMwt
MILLER PHARMACY

Y

Botanical Seminar. Wed., Dec.
20, 4 p.m., Rm. 1139 Natural Sci-
ence Bldg. Guest speaker, Mr.
Howard A. Crum. Subject, "The
Distribution of Temperate Species
in the Mexican Moss Flora." All
interested are invited to attend.
Geometry Seminar: Wed., Dec.
20, 2 p.m., Room 3001, Angell
Hall. Prof. Rainich will speak on
Zhitomirsky's Paper on the Cur-

"1
GAI

I

a

BOOK
fop/k-n'ai

Don't forget to telegraph your
Christmas Greetings. Send
Santagrams to the kids, dated
from the North Pole and
signed by Santa Claus. Have
tolls charged to your tele-
phone.

305 S. Main

Phone 2-0997

WESTERN UNION
Phone 3-4221

0

Attention Teaching Candidates: vature of Polyhedra.
Opportunities for personal inter- Doctoral Examination for Mal-
views will be given on Wed., Jan.
10, to those interested in',teach- colm Edwin McDonald, Forestry
ing in Detroit. Elementary as and Conservation; thesis: "The
well as secondary teachers in sev- Ecology of the Pointe Mouillee
eral fields will be needed. For fur- Marsh, Michigan, with Special
ther information and appoint- Reference to the Biology of Cat-
ments, call the Bureau of Ap- Tail (Typha)," Wed., Dec. 20, 20-
pointments, 3-1511, ext. 489. 45 Natural Science Bldg., at 9 a.-
m. Chairman, W. W. Chase.
Summer Positions: Mi. Ken- Doctoral Examination for Vich-
neth Smith, Director of Camp eng Liu, Aeronautical Engineer-
Charlevoix (a private boys camp), n L
it:tesi: O Compressible

It s an ever welcome gift-easy to pick up
-and every one gift-wrapped for you. We
have a wonderful selection, so come in today
and make your choice.
COON'S BOOK STORE

-

I

i

44c to 5 P.M.'

Weekdays!

LiIT E F
- Last Times Today-

14 Nickels Arcade

Phone 3-4326

CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
Nationally Accredited
An Outstanding College in
a Splendid Profession
Entrance requirement
thirty hours of Liberal
Arts credits. Advanced
standing granted for
additional L.A. credits.
Next Class Starts
February 12
Excellent clinical fa-
cilities. Recreational
and athletic activities.
Dormitories on campus.
Approved for veterans.
350 Belden Ave.
Chicago 14, Ill.

We wish
to extend our
BEST WISHES
for a
,Merry Christmas
and a
Happy New Year

will interview students interested
in camp counselor positions at
the Michigan Union from 9 to 12
a.m., Wed.
The Standard Oil Company of
New Jersey has just asked forl

Laminar Boundary Layer with.
Suction," Thurs., Dec. 21, Room
1521, E. Engineering Bldg., 3:15
p.m. Co-Chairmen, J. D. Schetzer
and A. M. Kuethe.
n I. -

~

I.'

M Cfll

r

aq

RECORDING STUDIO
521 EAST LIBERTY
Phone 2-3053

STARTING
TODAY

- _1 1i - W -- -i.

- Starts

Thursday -

February graduates as follows: U Ioncerts
mechanical, civil, and architec- program of Concertos and Ari-
nural e nee Mus r employ ent in as featuring student soloists with
eneuheaMutberesingle.I the University Symphony Orches-
enough men are interested in this tra, Wayne Dunlap, Conductor,
position, they wil come here to 8:30 p.m., Wed., Dec. 20, in Hill
interview in January. If interest- Auditorium. Music of Mozart, De-
ed, call at the Bureau of Appoint- bussy, Brahms, Sibelius, Strauss
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg. and Rachmaninoff, performed by
Digby Bell, Bethyne Bischoff,
Academic Notices George Exon, Renah LaMed and
Donald Wyant, pianists, Theodore
Bacteriology Seminar: Wed., Johnson, violinist, and Carol Neil-
Dec. 20, 10 a.m. Room 1520, East son Wilder and Rose Marie Jun,
Medical Bldg. Speaker: Dr. Ruth sopranos. Open to the general
L o f g r e n. Subject: Absorption, public.
Permeability and Other Physical (Continued on Page 3)

MARK EOMOND GALE
STEVENS,* O'BRIEN * STORM

I

.......

4-1,

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III1:Iiin

L

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NOW SHOWING
RAd Oph SCOTT
" x16 t~-OZ MASENA ES

III

GLENN BRODERICK
FORD* CRAWFORD

GO TO EUROPE IN 1951
Over 50 Glorious Days
visiting
ENGLAND, HOLLAND, GERMANY,
SWITZERLAND, ITALY, FRANCE
All arrangemnts through American Express
Very Reasonable - With all major expenses included.
CALL OR WRITE TO MRS. HELEN COUTTS
9730 West Outer Drive, Detroit 23, Michigan
Telephone Denwood 2-2320

MICHIGAN LEAGUE CAFETERIA
d/wi4e3 you
A MERRY CHRISTMAS
CANDLELIGHT DINNER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23
CLOSED
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 24
MONDAY, DECEMBER 25

_I

LASTonus
BUccANEERs
sPurring
PAUL IIENREID - JACK OAKIE

11

I < "iw3 kA(LIAM I AIV FMIRDZ

I.....'?3.' MEFeature

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