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December 19, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-19

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LPIC Trr

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1M50

r

PROFESSIONAL DRIVE:
Phoenix Project Keeps.
Faculty Committee Busy

'

Glee

Gi ubs

To

Perform

Toright

. . . .

. . .

V

By VERNON EMERSON
The large-sized task of success-l
fully completing the Phoenix Pro-c
Ject's faculty drive has kept an
18-man faculty committee busy
since the drive began.
But Prof. William Haber, of the
economics department and chair-
man of the faculty drive, noted
that his committee has exerted no
pressure at all for pledges which1
now total more than $50,000.
"THERE HAS BEEN a wide-
spread response indicating gen-
uine faculty interest in the suc-
DAILYt
OFFICIALx
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 6)

cess of this undertaking which has
been especially gratifying to the
committee," Prof. Haber said.
He explained that committee
members are less interested in
the total sum pledged than ob-
taining a wide participation in
the campaign.
"In spite of this, pledges so far
show that in addition to good par-
ticipation from faculty in all
schools and colleges, total pledges
are sizable and may exceed
$100, 000.
* * *
PROF. HABER pointed out that
success of the faculty drive will
no doubt contribute greatly to
strengthening alumni participa-
tion in the national campaign. He
said that many alumni have ex-
pressed interest in the way the
faculty is reacting to Phoenix.
The committee, which is rep-
resentative of all the Universi-
ty's schools and colleges, does
most of its contact work by
means of letters, although some
of it consists of addressing
meetings and seeing individual
faculty members.
Members of the group were cho-,
sen by Prof. Haber, who serves on
the Project's executive committee,
after conferring with deans and
departmental heads.
NO ONE GROUP of the faculty
stands out in its pledging, Prof..
Haber remarked. "And that's as
it should be. Phoenix is a mem-.
orial which should gain the sup-
port of faculty people whether
they will participate in its re-
search activities or not."'
And the Phoenix executive com-

Will Present Annual
Christmas Concerts

0

MEMBERS OF THE 1910 GIRL'S GLEE CLUB POSE FOR THEIR OFFICIAL PICTURE.

Michigan Arts Chorale: Meet
at Lane Hall at 7 p.m. to go Car-
oling Wed., night. Girls have 12:00
permission.
Tau Beta Sigma: Meeting, Wed.,
Dec. 20, 7 p.m., Harris Hall.
Bridge Tournament: Union, 7:30
p.m., Wed., Dec. 20.
U. of M. Young Republican
Club: Business meeting, Wed.,
Dec. 20, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3B, Union.

i'

W.A.A. Square and Folk Dance'
Club. Meeting in W.A B 7:30-

9V:45 p.m., Wed., Dec. 20. mittee has hailed the faculty for
94p .W .D.0the interest it has shown in the
Project.
.Research Club: Meeting, Wed., " nagP'n rncal.mnm

Dec. 20, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theatre. Papers: "The Structure
of Thin Films on Solids," by Law-
rence O. Brockway, Professor of
Chemistry. "Language Living and
Dead: Comments on Recent De-
velopments in Understanding
Elamite and Persian," by George
G. Cameron, Professor of Near
Eastern Cultures and Chairman
of the Department of Near East-
ern Studies.
The English Journal Club will
meet at 8 p.m. Wed., Dec. 20 in
the East Conference Room of the
Rackham Bldg. The meeting will
be devoted to a symposium on
Love's Labours Lost. The panel
members will be Kenneth Wilson,
Saul Maloff, Merle Brown, and
Fatler Brennan. Moderator: Har-
old Orel.
Sociedad Hispanica: Annual
Christmas party at 8 p.m., Wed.,
in the Grand Rapids room of the
League. Bring a 25 cent gift. Ev-
eryone welcome.
Greek Students' Association.
Christmas Party at the Interna-
tional Center, Wed., Dec. 20, 8:15
p.m. Movies and special program.
Hillelzapoppin: All scripts must!
be deposited at the Hillel Office'
in Lane Hall by Thurs., Dec. 21.

in a specal proposa,t ie com-
mittee commended the faculty for
the success of its campaign to
date, expressing the belief that,
this will further stimulate the re-
sponse to Phoenix of alumni and
friends of the University.
Debaters
ge
13LEND
PIPE
TOBACCO

Women Will
Perform at
Mendelssohn
With a program of ecclesiasti-
cal and secular Christmas music1
the Women's Glee Club will make
its first appearance of the year at
8:15 p.m. today in Lydia Mendel-
ssohn.
The program, which is divided
into four sections: the Father, the
Son, the worshipper and the holi-
day, will include such favorites as
"O Holy Night," "Noel" andi
"White Christmas."
Contralto Arlene SollenbergerI
accompanied by pianist Pat Pierce
,will appear as guest artists.
THOUGH no one is quite sure
as to the founding date of the
'Women's Glee Club-some author-
ities say it was begun in 1895,
others in 1904 and still others in
1905-the group has built itself,
into an undeniable campus tradi-
tion.
During its carrer it has pos-
sessed various names: the Girl's
Glee Club, the Stanley Chorus
and the title it bears today with
a note of maturity.
The directors of the Glee Club
have also varied: from founder
Mrs. George Hastreiter to Thor
Johnsori, then an instructor in
music literature and now conduct-
or of the Cincinnati Sy'mphony;1
to Bill Sawyer, who made the club
into a dance band chorus and
operetta group; to Prof. Margue-
rite Hood, president of the Music
Educator's National Conference;
to today's leader, Jeanette Floyd
Estep.
* * ,
IN ITS early days. the Girl's
Glee Club was comprised of 10 to
20 co-eds. The 1905 "original"
group consisted of only 8 while
today the Club has 40 members.
Over the years its activities
have branched out from solely
local appearances to radio broad-
casts, two annual public con-
certs, numerous private appear-
ances and a spring tour through
the midwest.
Though three hours a week are
spent rehearsing, the group gets
together informally during the
year and also throws a farewell
banquet at the end of the spring
semester.
AT THE banquet, individual
awards are presented along with
the Women's Glee Club's Scholar-
ships of $50. The scholarships
have only one stipulation, that
they be used to study music in any
field desired.
The Glee Club's new director,
Mrs. Estep, wife of a law pro-
fessor, was formerly vocal in-
structor at Wyandotte High
School, Kansas City, Kansas.
Her enthusiasm for music was
evidenced by the choral group
she formed while there, and due
to lack of time during school
hours rehearsed at 7 a.m.
Since the beginning of the se-
mester the long hours of organiza-
tion and rehearsal by both the di-
rector and the members have been
s pointed toward tonight's annual
Christmas presentation.
The four divisions of the pro-
gram show both the formal as-
pect and the lighter side of the
Glee Club's repertoire. While per-
fection is always emphasized the
Women's Glee Club never loses
sight of the balance between clas-
sical and popular tastes.

Men To Sing
Over National
Radio Network
The Men's Glee Club will sing
to the largest audience in its 107
year history at 11:30 p.m. today
over a nation-wide N.B.C. hookup.
Tonight's half-hour broadcast
originating in the studios of
WUOM and reaching from Maine
to California, will consist of fam-
ous Christmas hymns and carols
from the Renaissance to the mod-
ern idiom.
Among the works that will be
played are Shubert's "Ave Maria,"
Adam's "Cantique de Noel" and
Mel Torme's "The Christmas
Story."
* * *
EVER SINCE its founding in
1843 the Glee Club has been add-
ing to its wide off-campus audi-
ences both by annual tours and
the record album of Michigan
songs that the club cut several
years ago.
The extensive agenda of the
55-voice group is not, however,
confined to radio shows and the
numerous local and away con-
certs.
Together, with the League and
the Union the Glee Club sponsors
Gulantics, the annual all-campus
variety show: In past years it has
also sponsored local appearances
by such nationally famous music
groups as Fred Waring's. The pro-
ceeds from Gulantics and the pro-
fessional shows are channeled into
the Glee Club's Scholarship Fund
which annually makes t h r e e
awards to deserving students.
* * *
THE GLEE CLUB tradition and
strong group spirit are essential
parts of the organization. Accord-
ing to its director Prof. Philip
Duey of the School of Music, the
spirit and attitude of the mem-
bers is the main reason for the
organization's success.
One custom that is carried
out on each tour is the initia-
tion ceremony given to a mem-
ber making his first trip with
the club. During one stopover the
novice must eat at a swank res-
taurant without using silver-
ware.
The tours are usually the high
spot of the year. Held during
spring vacation and following fi-
nals in June, they take the glee
club south, east, north and west.
Bookings for this year's spring
tour have already been arranged
in St. Louis, Memphis, Cincinnat-
ti, Chicago and Cleveland.
WHILE ON tour local alumni
who sponsor the concerts act as
host to the Glee Club members.
They arrange housing accomoda-
tions, mostly in private homes,
dates and parties.
Much of the credit for the
Glee Club's prominence is attri-
buted to the leadership of Prof.
Duey. A successful professional
singer he came to the University
in 1947. Previously Prof. Duey
had headed the department of
music at Butler University. Dur-
ing his vocal career he had ap-
peared on radio, in opera and
recitals, alongside such varied
figures as Fred Allen, Deems
Taylor, Al Jolson and Arturo
Toscanini.
Tonight's broadcast, which will
carry a touch of Michigan across
the nation, will inaugurate the
Glee Club's 1950-51 season both as
an entertainment and as a public
relations group for the University.

lk

t

r
~

{'
i..

LIBRARIANS JOYCE HOWARD AND INA SUSSMAN CHECK
THE MUSIC SHEETS. * " *a *

!

I
J,

GET READY,
Get set. ..
BUT-
Before you go, make sure that you

. 4

-11

.,t

PROF. DUEY URGES THE MEN'S GLEE CLUB ON TO GREATER HEIGHTS

I

send

your laundry

to the KYER

LAUNDRY.
Laundry left at any one of our
stores by 9:0,0 A.M. Tuesday will be

returned on Thursday,

2:00 P.M.

A
Daily
Photo
Feature
Story by
Leonard Greenbaum

I t.

Laundry left at our stores by 1:00
P.M. Tuesday will be returned Friday.
TI 1r.on

,

SH M., f,

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