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September 27, 1950 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-27

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE PTTE

r._..,. ...<

Independents To

Stage

Ball

Amidst Mountains of Moon

Harberd's, Jackson's Orchestras
Couples To Dance in "Other W
"Other worldiness" will set the graphy booth will
stage when Assembly and AIM toward creating a
present the fifth annual A-Hop real atmosphere.
& from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday, Oc- , *
tober 7, in the League ballroom.
The dance, this year called Moon TWO ORCHESt
Midst, will transport couples of the nain featur
the common, familiar life of to- Johnny Harberd
day to a fantastic, unreal world son with mheir orc
among the mountains of the moon. vide the music fo
* * * By having two
IN THE CENTER of the ball- committee feels1
room there will be a reproduction be music which
of 'a rocket ship, while about the everyone. For th
walls there will be murals depict- hot and fast, Job
ing imaginary scenes of the world orchestra has J
of the moon. while Hugh Jack
Programs which were design- those who like t]
ed by Carol Kritchman will also and dreamy.
emphasis the "out of this world" Tickets for the
theme, sale today in the
Concessions and a unique photo- Administration B

To Play;
Worldliness"
lend themselves
mystic and un-
TRAS will be one
res of the event
and Hugh Jack-
hestras will pro-
r the dance.
orchestras, the
that there will
will appeal to
ose who like it
hnny Harberd's
ust the thing,
son will delight
,heir music slow
dance will go on
League, Union,
uilding and the
be informal, and
sted that women
nce do not wear
students will be
sion for the af-
he dance will be
of the Phoenix

Hockey Club
The Hockey club will hold an
organization meeting at 5 p.m.
tomorrow in the WAB. Old and
new members are invited to at-
tend the meeting. Coeds are re-
quested to come dressed to
play.

Quads.
The dance will'
it has been reques
attending the da.
corsages. Women
given late permis
fair.
Proceeds from t
used for the work
Project.

Oratorical Association

University of Michigan

1950-51 LECTOU E COURSE
Hill Auditorium Evenings at 8:30

Folk Dancers
Organize Club
"Swing your partners and pro-
menade the hall!"
The familiar ring of the voice
of the caller will be heard from
7:30 to 10 p.m. today at the WAB
when the Folk and Square Dance
Club meets for the first time this
year.
The club is one of the new WAA
co-recreational clubs and is open
to any student regardless of ex-
perience. The program includes a
variety of dances including folk,
square, reel, and round dances.
Opportunities a r e provided
through the club for any inter-
ested member to try out his talent
at calling. The regular club caller
is Wayne Kuhns, who called for
the orientation w e e k square
dances.
The renewed interest in the ac-
tivity is evident from the tremen-
dous turn out at the square
dance held during orientation
week. The estimated 1,500 people
at the dance held in the League
Ballroom included new students,
old students and even high school
students.
Officers of the Folk and Square
Dance Club are president, Rick
Kurland; vice-president, Wayne
Kuhns; secretary, Elaine Roth-
man; treasurer, Barbara Scheyer;
publicity manager, Vance Burns.
Polished Nails
Aid Grooming
The appearance of a woman's
hands is very important, and noth-
ing detracts more from nice hands
than chipping nail polish.
To insure a neat, well-kept man-
icure which will add to the ap-
pearance of well-groomed hands,
women should follow these few
simple rules:
Twice a month take half an hour
for a complete manicure. This will
form the base for lasting polish.
For the best results do nails at
bedtime so that they will have
overnight to dry thoroughly. Be-
fore going to bed, when nails feel
dry, touch them with oil to avoid
the imprint of sheets on the pol-
ish.
Hot water and washcloth will
blur nail polish, so steer away
from a hot bath or shower right
after a manicure.
Wait twenty-four hours before
applying more polish even if you
scratch the surface, for fresh pol-
ish will soften the original coat
unless it is very hard.
Between manicures, whenever
the polish begins to look frayed or
chipped, take a few minutes to ap-
ply a complete coat of polish to
the nails.
Hairstyles to
Flatter you!
Created by five
experienced hairstylists.
INDIVIDUALLY
STYLED TO PLEASE
Appointments unnecessary.
The DASCOLA
BARBERS
Liberty near State

Mrs. Samuel Estep has been ap-
pointed director of the Women's
Glee Club.
She succeeds Miss Marguerite V.
Hood, associate professor of music
educaton, director of the club
since 1945. Miss Hood resigned
her position to take over her new
duties as president of the Music
Educators' National Conference,
which has a membership of 20,-
000 school music teachers.
MISS HOOD'S new duties will
take her out of town frequently
for lectures and demonstrations.
Mrs. Estep's appointment was
made by a unanimous vote of
the executive committee of the
Glee Club. She received a bach-
elor of science degree in music
from Emporia State Teacher's
College, Emporia, Kansas, in 19-
40. She did work towards a mas-
ter's degree at Northwestern
University.
Before her marriage to Prof.
Samuel Estep of the University
Law School, the former Jeannette
Floyd was vocal instructor at Wy-
andotte High School, Kansas City,
Kansas.
* * *

MISS MARGUERITE HOOD

MRS. SAMUEL ESTEP

Women's Glee Club To Have
Mrs. Estep as New Director

CLOTH FIT FOR KINGS:
History of Rare Cash mere Yarn Dates Back
To Ancient, Mystic Days of Kashmir Kings

A Capella choirs and glee clubs
for women and boys, besides in-
tensiye study under a number of
well known choral instructors. She
is also a member of Sigma Alpha
Iota, national music sorority.
"The Glee Club will include
in its repertoire," Mrs. Estep
s a i d, "music from various
schools of composition for wo-
men's voices. We hope that ev-
erything we do will be fun to
sing and a ple-sure to listen to."
Try-outs for the club are being
held from 4 to 5 p.m. today and
tomorrow and from 7 to 9 p.m.
today at the League. The club is
made up of 50 women, with 35
of these participating in the an-
nual Spring vacation concert tour
through nearby states. Plans are
also being made for a Christmas
concert with the Men's Glee Club
and the annual Spring concert.
All University women, including
first semester freshmen, are eli-
gible to try out for the Glee Club.

Allthe exotic mystery and won-.
derment of the Orient is recap-
tured in the history of cashmere
cloth.
The exquisite shawls of prehis-
toric patterns prized by the Ro-
man Ceasars and esteemed centur-
ies later by the French and Brit-
ish Courts, the King of the Bel-
gians, and the Duc du Berri, were
woven in Kashmir, land of maha-
rajahs, last outpost of civilization,
before the forbidding mountain
masses of the impenetrable Hima-
layas.
* * *
TODAY, little of the casmere
wool comes from Kashmir. Most of
it is found farther north where
the best grades originate in China,
Inner and Outer Mongolia, Man-
churia and Tibet.
The world supply is not pro-
portionately much greater than
in the storied yesterdays when
ermines, brocades and rare yarns
of Kashmir were only for kings
and their courts.
A strange domestic animal'
whose only habitat is the remote
lands of Central Asia is the pro-
vider of the rare fleece,
* * *
SMALL, SHORTLEGGED and
graceful, the horned cashmere goat
is able to live on little food.
A warm undercoat of fine
fleece and a thick outer coat of
coarse hair protect the petite
animal from the severe moun-
tain winters.
Animals living at fantastic
heights have the finest fleece. Nat-
ural shades are gray, brown and
white. White cashmere is rarest
of all and commands a premium
prices, especially when pastel
shades are in fashion.
* * *
ONE YEAR'S yield from four
to six animals is needed for a

sweater and the annual output
from about twenty goats is neces-
sary for an overcoat.
The animal is not shorn, but
rather the fleece is plucked: or
combed out by hand. Much of
it is collected bit by bit from
the shrubs on which the ani-
mal scratches itself to get rid
of its itching coat during the
Spring molting time.
Much of the coarse outer hair
becomes mixed with the soft fleece
during the first handculling pro-
cesses and these unwanted hairs'
must be painstakingly removed.
* * *
EVEN AFTER this handsorting
process, remaining coarse hair
must be removed by a highly intri-
cate machine process.
From,animal to finished pro-
duct, cashmere loses from one-
half to three-quarters of its or-
iginal weight.
Often a year is needed to trans-
port the fine fleece from Inner-
Asia to ports on the China Sea.
The bales spend months on the
Great Silk Road which Marco Polo

explored in the thirteenth century.
Men carry the loads .on their
shoulders. and animals take over
on mountain trails.
* . S
THE NAME "cashmere" doubt-
less came from the oldest known
use of this wool of emperors in the
famous andwoven scarfts of
Sprinager, capital of Kashmir.
Degzree Given
Posthumously
A Bachelor of Arts degree in
Education was awarded 'post-
humously to Joanne Elizabeth
Chapel of Birmingham.
Miss Chapel died in an auto-
mobile accident, March 5, while
in her senior year at the Univer-
sity.
Granting of the degree was ap
proved by the Board of Regents
and the diploma was forwarded
to Miss Chapel's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Howard N. Chapel, by See-
tary Herbert G. Watkins.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

MRS. ESTEP'S musical
ence at Wyandotte High
included the direction of

experi-
School
several

1

Union Council
Holds Dinner
Union Council has invited the
League Council to a get-acquaint-
ed. dinner at 6:30 today in the
Union.
As these two groups often work
together on campus activities, the
dinner is an annual affair which
is held to give the council mem-
bers an opportunity to meet one
another and to become better ac-
quainted.
After dinner in the Terrace
Room, the council members will
finish the evening with dancing.
and bridge.
Bill DesJardins ,is in charge of
planning and arranging the din-
ner.
Sweet as Sugar
If a woman is wearing lipstick,
the chances are that her kiss will
be as sweet as sugar. The reason
for this is that powdered saccha-
rin, a powerful sweetening agent,
is used in lipstick to give that af-
fectionate greeting a tasteful zip.

(Continued from Page 4)
Michigan Men's Glee Club: Try-
outs from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Rm.
3G, Union.
Student Legislature Meeting:
7:30 p.m., Grand Rapids Room,
League. Important: pick up Agen-
da in SL office in Administration
Bldg. on Wed. before the meeting.
The first meeting of the W.A.A
Folk and Square Dance Club will
meet, 7:30 to 9:45 p.m., Womens
Athletic Building.
Craft Shop will open at Lane
Hall, 7:30-10 p.m.; instructions in
leather work, bead and shell
craft, etc.
Michigan Christian Fellowship:
Bible Study, "Upper Room," Lane
Hall, 7:30 p.m. An introduction
to the book of Romans will be
given by Jane Hollingsworth, In-
ter-varsity staff member for im-
proving Bible Studies.
Westminister Guild: Wed., Tea
and talk, Third floor parlor First
Presbyterian Church. 4-6 p.m.
Fri., Hay Ride at 8 p.m. Sign up
at the Church before Wed. eve-
ning.
The first meeting of the Uni-
versity Rifle Club will be held at
the R.O.T.C. rifle range at 7:30
p.m. All are invited. No previous
experience is required. The club
furnishes rifles and instruction
by a qualified N.R.A. instructor.
Experienced shooters are invited
to try out for the University Var-'
sity Rifle Team.
University of Michigan Soaring
Club: Open meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
1504 E. Engineering Bldg.
Coming Events
Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity:
Regular meeting will be held at
7 p.m., Thurs., at the Union. All
members are requested to attend.
An all campus organization
meeting of Generation, student
inter-arts magazine, will take
place Thurs., Sept. 28, in the ma-
gazine's office, Student Publica-
tions Bldg., 7:30 p.m. All inter-

'ested in working in any capacity
are cordially invited. No previous
experience necessary.
U. of M. Sailing Club: There
will be a business meeting for old
members Thurs., 7:30 p.m., Rm.
311, W. Engineering Bldg.
Hostel Club: Sat., Sept. 30: Pot-
luck supper .at 6 p.m. and Square
Dance at 8 p.m. Jones School.
Bring own table service for pot-
luck. Make reservations with Ruth
Bolt, 27319. Twenty-five cents
with hostel pass, fifty without
pass. Everyone welcome.

S
* Addms
*in Calif. pleas. add 3% Sal., Tax. In, t. A. 31/1%

r""
t
s
"

*roeew.y at Ninth. ts Angeles 14. CidiL

tu lsieIj1 \J1 Suodwoy . Ninlh, t
Dept. P "An all-round outdoor casual. Cbm.
'.,, .bins wonderfully with blue lean.
Oe.I" c.la. 21d Col. Perfect for riding, hiking or square
"*Duds Rancdancing. In warm, durable flai L
d. s!.w s Black & White, Brown & Whlte
10 SHIP C.O.D. - WILL PAY POSTAGE .
" Q CHECK OR M. 0. ENCLOSED,.TOLD PAT PosAI U! Sires 32!to 83.

l'MM 'DI-AT SHI MEN MO EY A C GU RAN E

p 5

'51

"OUT OF THIS WORLD:
A JOURNEY TO LHASA"
COLOR MOTION PICTURE
SCHEDULE OF ATTRACTIONS
Oct. 18 DAVID E. LILIENTHAL
"Atomic Energy for Peace"
Nov. 1 CHARLES LAUGHTON
An Evening With Charles Laughton
Nov. 7 LOWELL THOMAS, JR.
"Out of This World; A Journey to Lhasa"
Color Motion Pictures
Nov. 29 WILLIAM LAURENCE
"The Truth About the' Hydrogen Bomb"
Jan. 16 BENNETT CERF
"Changing Styles in American Humor"s
Mar. 7 JOHN MASON BROWN
"Seeing More Things"
Mar. 15 JULIEN BRYAN
"England in a Changing World"
Color Motion Pictures.

For Those Who Delight
in the Unusual.. 0
Handmade Linens
0 WENS and Lingerie
ANN ONS Tot's and Children's,
Dresses and Blouses
Presents ... Haitian Woodcraft
EEnTies and Ceramics
500 EAST LIBERTY, Ann Arbor Telephone 3-8781
Hours 9:30-5:30 Tuesday Evening Until 9:30
<o=n <}cwt<=c>.<t>0<-=t0<==><) t<)=oo<=>c<->

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Seniors

6'

11

SOPRANO? ALTO? IN BETWEEN?
Come and try out for the
University of Michigan
Women's Glee Club

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SIGN NOW
for your Picture

P

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Season Ticket Prices (7 Lectures):
FLOOR $7.80 FIRST BALCONY $6.60

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