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December 13, 1950 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1950

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

PAGE ELVEN

, a

Stores Carry W
Tiny Rhinestone Stars
Accent Formal Dresses
By MILLIE PAAVO
To give that added touch of
sparkle and femininity to Christ-
mas, fashion-wise women may
wish to complement their ward-
fobes with jewelry.
Stores are offering a wide as-
sortment of jewelry suitable for
all the occasions that might arise
during the holidays.
For a casual date dress, a plain
gold choker with or without a pen-
dant has been suggested: A
matching gold bracelet will com-
plete the ensemble.
* * *
ONE MIGHT also dress up a
casual outfit with scatter pins of
pearls, rhinestones or gold, fea-
tured in new and interesting
shapes.
Jewelry can be worn to high-
light black dresses worn for
those all important informal
dances.
Three strand pearl chokers withl
tiny pearl droplets gracefully
hugging the neck are especiallyl
fashionable this season. Pearl!
cluster earrings and matching
pearl bracelet add a finishing
touch to just about any dance
dress.
EMBEDDED rhinestones in a
gold flexed collar lend interest to
a. simple basic .dress placing it in
the class of clothes suitable for
dressy parties.
To glorify the neckline are
pearls on black velvet ribbon or

iide Choice of Holiday Jewelry
Q

SPARKLING STARS-To add a touch of Christmas to her holi-
day formal dress the model above wears small sparkling rhine-
stone stars. 'One is attached, slightly off center, to her rhinestone
choker and the other is neatly pinned in her hair.

Gift Selection
Offers Annual
Xmas Problem
Appliances for Home
Help Solve Question
Of 'WhatTo Give'
By SHEILA COHEN
With the' fast approach of
Christmas comes the problem of
"what to give?"
Personal gifts are practically
universal, but another solution to
the Christmas problem is to give
something for the house.
* * *
SELECTING a Christmas gift
for the housewife or her family
should be no problem with the
wide array of appliances and
gadgets now being offered:
An electric bean pot cooks
Boston style beans, chilli, soup,
or spaghetti and keeps them
piping hot for a buffet supper.
A tote cart simplifies serving
and clearing away. Between
parties the housewife will won-
der how she ever managed with-
out it in the kitchen.
A waffle baker is for the hos-
tess who entertains casually at
breakfast, luncheon or midnight
supper. An electric table broiler
wil cook steak, chops, hamburgers
or hot dogs and leave the oven
free for the rest of the menu.
IF SHE LOVES to cook, a set
of 14 utensils made of shining-
bright aluminum will be cherished
by a bride or homemaker whose
pans are old and battered.
Or a kitchen kit of can open-
er, knife sharpener, ice crusher
and fruit juicer, all made to fit
on one bracket that fastens to
the wall is being offered.
A timer will free her mind from
the clock-it rings a bell to say
"time's up, cake's baked."
FOR THE whole family a novel
dishwasher ought to be greeted
with joy. This useful little one
connects to a faucet, washes and
rinses a service for four, and is
much less expensive than the
larger ones.
An automatic coffee maker
of non-tarnishing chromium
with plastic handles brews per-
feet coffee and keeps it hot
indefinitely.
An electric egg cooker will turn
out eggs exactly right-soft,
medium or hard boiled.
* * *
ANOTHER family gift, although
it will not be enjoyed until sum-
mer, is a well fitted picnic ham-
per.
Colorful book-ends are an-
other idea. Also a cheery gift is
a fruits and sweets basket that
the whole family can enjoy.
Irish linen table cloths can add
cheer to any holiday table.
Lamps and clocks always carry
"that personal touch." So do trays
and framed pictures and paint-
ings.

REMARKABLE ROCKS:

Pages of History Give Proof
Of Women's Love for Jewels

i1

rhinestone necklaces. Small
rhinestone clips are particularly
appropriate for a Christmas for-
mal and tiny rhinestone stars
which twinkle in the light can
be worn in the hair.
Among the other bits of glitter

are jeweled clips to dress up black
velvet opera pumps.
Stick pins of odd design are
suggested for hats and lapels and
plain gold leaf scarf holders add
a touch of sparkle to plain silk
scarves.

By JANICE JAMES
Gentlemen may prefer blondes
in their Christmas stockings, but
the pages of history offer proof
that the blondes, and brunettes
too, prefer gifts of jewels, all sizes
and shapes.
Women may enjoy the pleasure
of having a reputation for chang-
ing their minds about various sub-
jects, but, through the ages, they
have remained staunch in their
admiration of jewelry.
Take for example, the gold
jewelry and precious stones which
the Queen of Shelba took with
her on her visit to Solomon. These
jewels were so striking that they
have been said to match the beau-
ty of Queen Sheba herself.
* * *
THE AUBURN-HAIRED Egypt-
ian queen, Cleopatra, favored the
topaz, but her jewel collection in-
cluded the world's finest diamonds
and emeralds of the time, many of
which came from her own mines.
Among her pearls was aprice-
less gem she is reported to have
dissolved in her love drink to
Anthony. Then too, there is her
amethyst ring, which she believ-
ed to have magical powers.
Age doesn't dim the beauty of
these ancient, but beautiful, pieces
of jewelry, as is evidenced by the
treasures which met the eyes of
archaeologists when they opened
the tomb of the Egyptian queen,
Zer.
UPON THE ARMS of the dead
queen were four bracelets of cast-
gold and turquoise which were as
clear and bright as on the day they
were placed in the tomb.
Oriental beauties have favored
for years the jade stone which
ranges in colors all the way from
red, black and yellow to a trans-
lucent white, known as "melt-
ing snow".
The Chinese Empress Tzu Hsi
particularly loved jade, and among
bracelets, rings and even jeweled
her large collection were earrings,
finger-nail protectors.
THE EMPRESS also owned a
marvelous rope of pearls, which
was buried with her, being wound
around her body nine times.
Marie Atoinette, known as one
of the most beautiful queens ever
to grace a royal throne, loved to
decorate not only herself but
many of her friends with jewels
of every range of beauty and
value.
In her less happy times, she pre-
sented her friend, the Princess
Lamballe with a necklace of carv-
ed ivory beads joined by a fine
gold chain. She also sent her friend
a ring containing a lock of her
hair which by that time was
"bleached by sorrow."

TAKING A glimpse at more
modern times, one finds the pieces
of jewelry possessed by Queen Vic-
toria. One of the most fascinating
is the snake ring which she re-
ceived from Prince Albert. It was
a gold snake with fourteen hinged
joints, twelve of them set with
one diamond to each joint.
The head joint passed through
a loop in the tail, and the inside
of the ring was enameled in
black and white. After the death
of Albert, the queen always wore
a minature of him in an open
locket.
A brief glance at the pages of
history will help any bewildered
male solve the problem of what
to give to whom, for to a woman
a jewel is a jewel.
Novel T0uch
A cisto Gifts
Gifts for Christmas can be made
more personalized with a few nov-
el touches.
Those who plan to give the teen-
ager on their list a pair of loafer
socks for Christmas, may add a
special greeting with a monogram.
Cuff links will make a welcome
gift to dress-up a woman's blouse
or a man's shirt. Initial buttons
can be used for a variety of "for-
you-alone" gifts, and figure-eights
of wire may be made and clamped
on plain round button backs.
To brighten the homemaker's
Christmas , morning and every
morning thereafter, a hand-deco-
rated cookie jar or laundry sprink-
ler is the answer.
The laundry sprinkler is made
from an empty bottle and a sprin-
kling head. The bottle is coated
with enamel and when it dries
rose seals and perhaps three ini-
tials are added for decoration.
The cookie jar can be made from
a one-gallon container, which is
coated with white shellac. The out-
side is decorated with flowers. Fur-
ther trimmings, including a large
initial, can also be used.
FOR THAT GUY
That likes footballs, basket-
balls, and High-Bolls-
BIG TEN HI-BALL GLASSES
$5.00, Packed for shipping
$5.50 Shipped anywhere in U.S.
L. G. BALFOUR CO
1319 S. University Ph. 3-1733

J~o6Iarj maqic!

-
-/
Youfllenchanteyour auds
. . . smooth satins . Pick MONDAY EVENINGS
your glamour-frock in short, 'TIL 9:00
ankle, or floor length.
stranpes or iackets .

AGE OLD TRADITIONS:
Customs Accompany Yuletide

By NANCY TAYLOR
Holly, mistletoe, candy canes,
brightly wrapped presents, groups
of carolers--all these are Christ-
inas.
In no other country in the
world is Christmas planned for
and awaited with so much anti-
cipation and celebrated with so
mufh festivity as in America.
The old legend of St. Nicholas
and the festival celebrated in his
honor in Holland and Belgium has
evolved in this country into the
traditional story of Santa Claus
and his eight reindeer who visit all
the children on "the night before
Ohristmas."
IN THE FLEMISH countries St.
Nicholas is honored on Dec. 6,
which is known as St. Nicholas'
Eve. Early in the evening St.
Nick, in reality one of the adults
of the family, appears in the vest-
mets of a bishop and carries a
basket full of toys and sweets.
He is always accompanied by
his servant who carries an open
sack for bad children and a
rod to punish them.
After questioning the children,
the old man leaves, promising to

return later. The young people go
to bed after placing receptacles
for tbzeir gifts where St. Nicholas
can find them. They use shoes,
plates and baskets.
THE CHRISTMAS TREE which
is so familiar to all Americans is
virtually unknown in these Fle-
mish countries.
The reindeers, too, are of
American invention. In Europe
St. Nicholas is represented as
riding a gray horse.
In France gifts are distributed
to the children by "little Noel,"
and in England Father Christ-
mas is the jolly old man who
bringe delightful surprises on
Christmas Eve.
* * *
IT IS IN THIS country that all
the old world Christmas customs
are combined. The idea of the
Christmas tree was imported from
Germany,
Miserly old Ebenezer Scrooge
with his "Christmas! Bah, hum-
bug" and'i the "God bless us
everyone" of Tiny Tim are dear to
the hearts of many children and
adults in America as well as in
England.

Women Favor
Imitation Fur
The day has passed when mi-
lady's furs had to be the real thing
or she was an outcast in "society."
Today furs are being shown, ob-
viously fake, not only in stoles
and capes, but in dresses, skirts,
and slacks as well.
Fur scarfs, predominently in
leopard, have sold beyond all ex-
pectations. Belts and accessories,
such as minkstails, lapel pins and
hat trimmings have also been very
popular during the winter months.
Slacks and skirts in a plu' fake
fur are also available in some of
the local stores. Fur-fashioned
sports clothes are an innovation
this year.
New York and Paris authorities
are advocating complete fur out-
fits from dress to coat.
Another idea is the reversible
fur skirt. Wool on one side and
fur on the other. The skirt can
be worn in the daytime, fur out,
as an ensemble with matching fur
jacket, and as an evening skirt,
wool out, with the fur peeping
through at the wearer's every
turn.
Paris is showing, of all things,
fur umbrellas.

i
f
f
t
y
c

i

Sizes 9-15.
$22.95 to $39.95
TOWN AND COLLEGE SHOP
302 South State

I L-____

.

-

Read and Use The Daily Classifieds!

-- _
:

It's snowing
this Christmas

*1.
"

In Ann Arbor
508 E. William St.
Like a gay Christmas Carousel
we sing to you of wonderful gifts of music!

b.

4,
"-f
t

t , ^;.: .., f .\'' i ..5.. t m
,4 :::I y'2x
' f ':' 'pt' 4$ t

Say "happy holidays" with this trim
3-way RCA victor portable radio. With
"Golden Throat" tone . . . it plays on
its own batteries or plugs into AC or
DC outlet. It's a Christmas Champ at
only $29.95. Less batteries.
And for the music-lovers on your list, who
like "command performances" of their
favorite records, give this neat, compact,
3-speed Webster-Chicago portable
plays all size, all speed records with full,
life-elike tone . . . plugs into any AC out-
let. Burgundy leatherette case. $49. Terms,

*

'
_

*

For the musically gifted
. see our stacks and
stacks of SHEET MUSIC

a) Briefs . . . tailored or lace
trimmed . . . white, blue, honey
mist. $1.65 to $3.95
b) Kaiser Hose.. . thort, medium
& long, 45 gauge $1.50, 51 gauge
$1.75
Fit All Tops (for larger women)
45 gauge $1.65, 51 gauge $1.75
c) Petticoats . . . white, black,
summer amber, blue. $4.95 to
$7.95
d) Nightgowns . . . tailored or
lace trimmed wide range of pastel
shades. Sizes 32 to 46. $7.95 to

4

... and by all means, you
must see our record-
beater collection of . . .

'

Gianni Schicchi-Opera in One Act-Puccini-
Cetra No. 50,028 LP-$5.95

The Messiah-Handel-Col. LP-SL 51 Vol. I, II,
& III-$14.55

I

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