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September 20, 1950 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1950

'S HE MIU119AN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION:
Lilienthal To Open Lecture Series

r1

4.

* * *

* * *

The Oratorical Association's
1950 lecture series will range from
"The Hydrogen Bomb" to "Chang-
ing styles in American Humor,"
featuring s u c h distinguished
'zpeakerS. as David E. Lilienthal,
Rfmnett Cerf, Charles Laughton
and Lowell Thomas, Jr.
I-tudents will get a deal from
the Association as well as an out-
standing list of speakers. The sec-
ond balcony of Hill Auditorium,
site of the lectures, will be re-
served for students for general
admission season tickets for $2.40.
The balcony holds 1400.
LILIENTHAL, former chairman
of the U.S. Atomic Energy Com-

mission, will speak Oct. 18 on a
subject to be announced. Lilien-
thal co-authoried with Secretary
of State Dean Acheson the fa-
mous Acheson-Lilienthal Report,
a formula to determine the course
for the nation to pursue in regard
to international atomic energy
control.
LAUGHTON'S program, slated
for Nov. 1 is entitled "An Evening
with Charles Laughton." With a
repetoire drawn from his more
famous roles the distinguished star
is entertaining national audiences
in a limited number of personal
appearances this year.
Lowell Thomas, Jr. will pre-
sent his color motion picture
lecture, "Out of this World; A
Journey to Lhasa," Nov. 7.
Thomas and his father trekked
through the Himalayas earlier
this year to get the material
and films for this presentation.
Nov. 29, William L. Laurence,
Pulitzer Prize-winning science re-
porter for the New York Times
will speak on "The Truth About
the Hydrogen Bomb." One of the
select group who have known
about the hydrogen bomb for
years, Laurence is attempting to
explain its intricacies to college
audiences.
Laurence has been science re-
porter for the New York Times for
20 years, saw the atomic bomb
manufactured and saw it dropped

1950-1951

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

CONERT

CHARLES LAUGHTON
on Nagasaki. He is the only news-
paper man to receive the Pulitzer
Prize twice for reporting.
FIFTH MEMBER of the series
will be Bennett Cerf who will lec-
ture Jan. 16 on "Changing Styles
in American Humor." Cerf, presi-
dent of Random House and Mo-
dern Library is also a noted au-
thor and columnist.
John Mason Brown will make
his fifth annual appearance in
Hill Auditorium March 7 when
he discusses, "Seeing More
Things." The editor of the Sat-
urday Review of Literature has
been a great favorite with Ann
Arbor audiences for his quick
wit and sharp commentaries on
the literature and drame of the
day.
Final number of the series will
be given March 16 when Julien
Bryan will present a technicolor
motion picture lecture on "Eng-
land in a Changing World." Bryan
is the executive director of the
International Film Foundation
and has been billed on the lec-
ture series a number of times in
the past.
Mail orders addressed to the
Oratorical Association's offices in
3211 Angell Hall are now being ac-
cepted. The Hill Auditorium box
office will open Tuesday, Sept. 19,
the Association has announced.

LOWELL THOMAS, JR.

72nd ANNUAL CHORAL UNION SERIES

HELEN TRAUBEL, Soprano . .
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,

. Thursday,

October 5

Charles

Munch, Conductor

Sunday, October 22

. . . . .

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA,
George Szell, Conductor

. Sunday,

November 5

. . w. .

SOLOMON, Pianist

. . . . "

WILLIAM LAURENCE'
I.* ,

POLYTECH CHORUS OF FINLA
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCH
Sir Thomas Beecham, Condu

. . . . Monday, November 20
ND . Tuesday, November 28
i ESTRA,
ctor . . Sunday, December 3

ERICA MORINI, Violinist

Thursday, January 11

9 "9 r. " f "

HOROWITZ, Pianist .

Friday, January 19

CH ICAGO

SYMPHONY

. . . . . . . . . .
/ORCH ESTRA,

Raphael Kubelik, Conductor .

. Sunday, March

4

. . .

HEI FETZ,

Violinist . . . . . . . .

Wednesday, March

14

SEASON TICKETS: Block A, $16.80; Block B, $14.40; Block C, $12.00.

JULIEN BRYAN

BENNETT CERF

i

CROWDED BUT POPULAR:
.U' Library Stores 1,400,000 Books

AT THE TIME of its completion,
the University population was
about 6,000 and wild estimates at
growth said a 10,000 enrollment
might be expected.
In 1950 with enrollment just
double what was predicted then,
remnants of the old building
may still be seen. Climbing out
on the roof, the old stack sec-
tion looms up clearly between
the three new wings. This ori-
ginal section was not demolish-
ed because of excessive cost. Up
in the attic above the old sec-
tion, the out-dated maple
beams are still holding up the
roof.
But time and change have left
their mark.
The hordes of students who
make their appearance around the
fifth, eighth and fourteenth weeks
of each semester have worn down
the marble stairs so that the
treads have had to be turned.
Fluourescent lights have replaced
the old, overhanging chandeliers.
And the library staff has trebled
since its first days.
* * *
THE PLANT itself is a complex
combination of machinery, books
and personnel. Gadgets like the
conveyor belt with its intricate
controls, carefully calculated loads
and questionable efficiency, and
the buzzers, telephones and pneu-
matic tubes which connect the
widely separated stations in the
stacks, would fascinate even the
non-mechanical.

The bindery is a spot worthy
of more appreciation. Every
University book as need arises
is processed through the large,
well - lighted basement room
which holds equipment for every
type of book-binding from the
rare books of the Clements Li-
brary and Michigan Historical
Collections, to the regular rou-
tine jobs of rebinding well-used
research volumes.
As for books themselves, the li-
brary offers the widest possible
collection. Books in every lan-
guage, printed on everything from
sheepskin to papyrus, on every
subject from Hindhu mythology to
horse-racing can be found in the
reading rooms, stacks and branch-
es of the General Library.
THE LIBRARY collection is still
growing at, a rate of 30-40,000 vol-
umes annually. Books are purchas-
ed with department funds and a
special library fund under Warner
G. Rice, Director of the Library.
And private donations keep pour-
ing in.
With one of the largest circula-
tions in the country, the General
Library is serving Michigan stu-
dents with good books, after a
short wait.

Success at 'U'
Won by Most
Of Freshmen
(Continued from Page 1)
ate programs. Of the total number
in each entering class, about 55
per cent receive a bachelor's de-
gree, while another 25 per cent
enter a professional school after
two or three years of undergrad-
uate work.
In each freshman class, ap-
proximately 13 per cent find
University work too difficult or
uncongenial, while seven per
cent run into personal difficul-
ties which force their withdraw-
al.
In commenting on the statistics,
Registrar Ira M. Smith said that
the University has a responsibility
to those who apply for admission.
If they will find the work too dif-
ficult, they should not be admit-
ted, he said.
Guils Federate
The student Congregational-
Disciples-Evangelical a n d Re-
formed Guild has been formed by
federation of the. Disciples of
Christ, the Congregationalists, and
members of the Evangelical and
Reformed Church, it has been an-
nounced.
The Guild House, at 438 May-
nard St., is sponsored by these
three churches.

LAURITZ

MELCHIORTenor . .Tuesday,October

FIFTH ANNUAL EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

10

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,

Charles

Munch, Conductor.

. . . Wednesday, October 25

MY RA

HESS, Pianist * . . . *

Tuesday, November 14

DON COSSACK CHORUS. . . . . . . MondayJanuary
Serge Jaroff, Conductor

15

CINCINNATI SYMPHONY

ORCH ESTRA/

Thor Johnson, Conductor

Tuesday, February 20

" " * * s

SEASON TICKETS: Block A, $8.40; Block B, $7.20; Block C, $6.00.

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CONCERTS

"MESS I

AH" (Handel) . . . . . . . . December 9 and 10, 1950
Nancy Carr, soprano; Eunice Alberts, contralto;
David Lloyd, tenor; Oscar Natzka, bass;
Choral Union and Orchestra; Lester McCoy, Conductor
TICKETS: 70c and 50c. On sale beginning October 16.
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

BARGAIN PRICES

Why1 £Slae

OR WAHDAY

BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET.

February 16,

17, 18,1951

SWI FT'S

DRUG STORE

Do your entire laundry in
half an hour at our store.
Wash, rinse, and damp-
dry clothes automatical-
ly in Westinghouse Laun-
dromat automatic wash-

Josef Roisman, Violin; Boris Kroyt, Viola
Jac Gorodetzky, Violin; Mischa Schneider, Violoncello
SEASON TICKETS: $3.60 and $2.40. On sole beginning October 16.

340 South State Street

\\
-.,' '
t=-_: - _- -_ ____

FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL MAY FESTIVAL

-k

ers.

Prescriptions

Drug Sundries

Student Supplies

DRYERS AVAILABLE
TO DRY CLOTHES
COMPLETELY

SIX CONCERTS . . . . . . . . . . . May

3/415,

The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, Conductor, and
Alexander Hilsberg, Associate Conductor; University Choral
Union, Thor Johnson, Guest Conductor,, and Lester McCoy,

6, 1951

Stationery

Magazines

11

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A - I -U --i 4%I _ i

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