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September 20, 1950 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1950

11j

CAMPUS GOYVERNMENT:

Student Legislature Meets'U' Problems

__t

(Continued from Page 1)
at a glance just what's going on
throughout the entire year.
This committee also concerns
itself with suggestions of dif-
ferent and new courses in the
various University colleges and
schools, movies and the faculty
rating system, which SL origi-
nated two years ago.
Movies of all makes, sizes, lan-
guages and content will be the
responsibility of the Cinema Guild,
working with this Committee. The
Bureau recently took over Art Ci-
nema League, which brings to the
campus movies almost every week-
end during the year.
ONE OF THE biggest projects
for the Legislature this year will
be in'combating discrimination on
the campus and in professional
schools, living quarters and the
community, which is the respon-
sibility of the entire Legislature.
SL President George Roumell,
'51 has sent letters out to all
fraternities asking chairmen of
national conventions to work to-
ward removal of clauses in their
constitutions. which discrimin-
ate because fo race, religion or
color.
The Legislature will work for a
positive program of anti-discrim-
ination throughout the year.
PART OF THIS PROGRAM is
the Human Relations Subcommit-
tee, whose main goal is to bring
students of different races and
religions closer together on cam-
pus to discuss mutual interests,
problems and experiences.
A Speakers Bureau, a'continua-
tion and enlargement of the HR
program, has been set up, under
which some 50 faculty members
will be asked to be available to
speak at informal after-dinner dis-
cussions between University house
groups to improve faculty-student
relations. Forty members of the
faculty have already been en-
listed.!

REPRESENTING the students
nationally and internationally is
the National Student Association
Committee, which works for stu-
dent rights.
During the summer the big-
gest project of SL and the NSA
Committee was playing host to
the annual congress of NSA,
spokesman and champion for all
college students throughout the
United States.
Shortened to the alphabetized
"NSA," the Association met at the
University in August to discuss the
rights of college students and to
act against discrimination.
NSA also gives many services
to students, such as summer tra-
vel and study programs and other
privileges and rights available to
students.
* * .*
ON THE, SOCIAL side of gov-
ernment, the Varsity Committee
handles each year the big home-
coming dance this fall after the
Wisconsin game Oct. 21.
This Committee also has
charge of campus "rah-rah,"
alias the old college "spirit,"
and with the cooperation of the
Wolverine Club, pulls off pep
rallies and athletic team's send-
offs and welcomes.

Legislature include the Better
Business Bureau, which looks out
for illegal sales and solicitors on
campus; the Student Experts, who
guide incoming freshmen through
the maze of interesting-looking
subjects; and the Rent Subcom-
Piittee, which protects students
against unfair rents in indepen-
dent rooming houses in the city.
* * *
ONE OF THE biggest achieve-
ments of the Legislature in
its five years of work was the in-
spiration of the Phoenix Project,
which grew out of an SL sugges-
tion of a war memorial to the
University's nationwide project for
peacetime use of atomic energy.
Struggling for a long Thanks-
giving weekend, without classes
between the actual holiday and
the weekend, is a unique one-man
committee, which (who) has been
working all year to achieve its
(his) goal, and may succeed in the
fall if administrators see eye to
eye with the committee's propo-
sals.
Any student wanting to know
what goes on inside SL's vast ma-
chinery can look up the Public
Relations Committee, which gives
the complete facts to students on
what their representatives are do-

REGISTRATION-Students fill out and turn in class cards in Waterman Gymnasium in order to elect
their courses. The long tables are provided with time schedules for all courses in the University, writ-
ing equipment, and schedule cards. Freshman orientation leaders are present to help out bewildered

Other services offered by the ing.

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Other fields of study that have
active clubs on campus are ar-
chitecture, public administration
business administration, indus-
trial relations, anthropology,
journalism, marketing, chemis-
try, sociology, and psychology. 1
There is also the American Guild,
of Organists, American Ordnance;
Association, Student Science So-
ciety, Barristers Society, Forester's
Club, Social Research Club, Ga-
lens, Law Students' Association,
Michigan Actuarial Club, Women's
Physical Education Club, Michi-
gan Crib, Pre-Medical Society, and
American Pharmacy Association.
* * *
WITH STUDENTS at the Uni-
versity from all corners of the
earth many clubs have sprung up
in which foreign students get to-
gether to bring into their college
life a bit of their native laid.
Among these are clubs rep-
resenting the Arab countries,
China, India, Hawaii, Turkey,
Poland, and the Philippines.
Working in conjunction with
these are a Committee for Dis-
placed Persons and a Commit-
tee for International Living.
Enthusiasts of French, German
and Russian have formed clubs
in which the foreign language is
exclusively spoken in an attempt
to aid students improve their skill
with them.
Students from the Upper Pe-
ninsula get together under the
titles of the Hiawatha and Ish-
peming Clubs, while those from
Cleveland rally to the banner of
the Cleveland Club.
DEPENDING on whether you're
affiliated or an independent you'll
probably join one of the following
coordinating groups: Assembly,
an association for independent
women; Association of Indepen-
d e n t Men, Inter-Cooperative
Council, Inter-Fraternity Council
or Panhellenic, an association of
sorority women.
Then there are the League
and Union student offices which
are the administrators of stu-
dent affairs for these recrea-
tional centers.
Other student governmtfnt or -
ganizations are the all-campus
Student Legislature, the Men's
and Women's Judiciary Councils,
the Engineering Council and the
Music School Student Council.
FOR THE All-Americans, news-
paper editors, campus belles and
other assorted big wheels who
manage to get a decent scholastic
record there are the honorary so-
cieties, namely; Druids, Michaga-
mua, Scroll, Senior Sociey, Sphinx,
Triangles, Vulcans and Wyvern.
There also are just plain clubs
for people who have a simple
interest in common as the chess
Club, Fireside Group, Flying

CONTAINING cards requesting
identical information, the railroad
ticket is divided up among various
University offices. According to
Assistant Registrar Edward Groes-
beck, the University would have
to spejid about $1 for each stu-
dent if one card were filled out
and photostated 12 times.
A check of the offices which
receive cards reveals that the
information is used for every-
thing from supplying men with
coeds' telephone numbers to
making out transcripts.
The long tickets are collected by
the cashier at registration and al-
phabetized in Waterman Gym as
they are turned in. After regis-

Registrar's Office
International Center
Health Service
Office of Student Affairs
Union
League
Dean of Women's Office
Men's Physical Education.,De-
partment
Alumni Catalog Office
Business Office
Cashier's Office
Student Publications Build-
ing
The only card the student gets
to keep as a reward for his ex-
penditure of ink and energy, is
his cashier's receipt, which shows
he has not only payed his tuition,
but has mastered the intricacies
of the registration machine.

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(Continued from Page 1)
merly they were responsible for
signing eligibility cards.
Now, managers fulfill their
responsibility by turning in to
the Office of Student Affairs
an alphabetical list of all stu-
dents participating in activities
under their leadership, indica-
ting positions held.
For activities organized at the
beginning of a semester, lists must
be filed not later than the end of
the first week of classes. For ac-
tivities organized during the se-
mester, participation lists must be
filed within 48 hours after the
activity is organized.
These participation lists will be
checked against a card file of stu-
dents on academic discipline. If a
student is found to be illegally par-
ticipating in an activity he will be
subject to disciplinary action.
ELIGIBILITY require-
ments must be met by students
participating in the following ac-
tivities:
1-Public performances which
are sponsored by student organi-
zations and which require group
rehearsals: Union Opera, Junior
Girls' Play, Gilbert and Sullivan
Society, Student Players Theatre
Guild,. Inter-Arts Union, Arts
Chorale, Michigan Singers, Glee
Clubs and Band (for student not
enrolled in Band course.)
First term freshman, however,
are eligible to participate in the
Marching Band.
2-Staff members of student
publications: Daily, Michiganen-
sian, Technic, Generation.
3-Officers and chairmen of
standing committees in student

sembly, Business Administration
Council.
6-Committee members of ma-
jor campus projects and dances:
Michigras, Winter Carnival, Lea-
gue Committees, Frosh Week-end,
Sophomore Cabaret, Assembly
Ball, Homecoming Dance, Senior
Ball, J-Hop.
7-Representatives to off-cam-
pus conferences.
The Dean of Women and the
Dean of Students can both grant
special eligibility and deny per-
mission to participate in extra-
curricular activities in extraor-
dinary cases.
* > * *
INELIGIBLE students can still
participate in groups not requir-
ing eligibility as a requisite for
membership, providing they don't
hold any position stipulated above.
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