100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


ODNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1950 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

1agers Down arquette
VanderKuy, Putich Top Night's Scoring

for

irst

wiin0

0-37

AA U CLASSIC SATURDAY:
Frosh Swimmers Shine in'Detroit Meet

By TED PAPES
The Hilltoppers of Marquette
became Michigan's first basketball
victims of the season last night
when they bowed to the Wolver-
'ines, 40-37, in the Yost Fieldhouse.
It was the fifth defeat for the
yisitors against a single victory.
Michigan broke loose with a
scrappy attack and defense mid-
way in the first half to turn the
tide against Marquette's six-foot-
seven center, Grant Wittberger,
and his mates who had jumped
off to an early lead.
DURING THE contest the win-
ners came from behind six times.
They failed to score until 5:24
when Bill Putich broke loose to
drive in for the first field goal.
point-a -Minutle

MARQUETTE (37) G
Schramka F ............ 1
Basarich F .............. 2
Wittberger C ...............4
Sievers G ............. 4
Geldmacher G...........0
Marek G ................ 2
BarnettG............... 1
Vanlanduyt G.......... 0
Powers G ................ 2
Sattilli G.............. 0
Siverling G...........0
Totals .............. 16

F PF
1 3
2 1
0 2
0 0
1 1
1 1
0 2
0 0
0 2
0 0
0 0
5 12

TP
3
6
8
1
5
2
0
4
0
0
37

Putich stepped out of the
Wolverine Rose Bowl backfield
long enough to provide the
spark which ignited the bas-
ketball team. He racked up ten
points, second only to center
Leo VanderKuy who scored 12.
In addition he and Charlie
Murray put power into Michigan's
rebounding as they outfought the
Hilltoppers under both boards.
Three consecutivebaskets by
VanderKuy and a long one-hand-
er by Jim Skala at 11:50 wiped
out Marquette's early advantage
and gave their quintet a 12-11
edge.
THE WOLVERINES again fell
behind, staying there until Pu-
tich deadlocked the teams at 23-
23 with a long set shot from the
center court shortly before the
initial half ended.
After the intermission Coach
Ernie McCoy sent his most ef-
fective combination onto the
floor.
Skala and Paul Geyer manned
the forwards with VanderKuy at
center and Murray and Putich
guards. Skala took an out-of-
bounds pass from VanderKuy and
hit a long shot from the corner to
send Michigan to the front.
THE LEAD changed back and
forth until VanderKuy took final
command for the Wolverines with
a hook shot from in close for a
34-33 margin with eight minutes
left.
Bob Olson replaced Skala at
that point and fired a looping
one-hander through the netting
from far out to widen the gap.
Putich, who played the entire

game, pumped in a basket and
free throw and that was enough to
hold off the pressing Hilltoppers
as Michigan effectively controlled
the ball.
* * *
THE VICTORS switched their
defense at halftime from a man-
to-man to a tight zone and al-
lowed only six field goals from
that point.
Wittenberg and forward Glenn
Sievers led the 'Toppers on of-
fense with eight points each.
Their starting guard, senior Rus-
sell Geldmacher, injured his trick
knee early in the contest and had
to be removed.
The game produced few fouls.
Michigan converted six of its doz-
en attempts from the charity line
and Marquette capitalized on five
out of nine.
The Wolverines are idle until
Saturday night when they will
meet Butler's cagers at Indian-
apolis.

By HERB NEIL.
The showing of the freshmen
natators in their initial meet of
the year last Saturday should give
Michigan fans no worry about the
future of Wolverine swimming
teams in the next ifew years.
Participating in a Michigan
AAU meet in Detroit, the Wolver-
ine swimmers swept the first four
places in the 100 yard free-style,
the first three places in the 400
yard race, and first place in the
40 yard free-style.
* * *
TOM BENNER, one of Michi-
gan's brightest free-style pros-
pects, turned in a double win, an-
nexing both the 40 and 100 yard
tests. The freshman won the
shorter race in 18.3, good time for
the 40 ,and took the 100 in 55.5.
Pete Bargrow, Bob Byberg,
and Don Ferguson followed Ben-

having to go back and

touch the

More Sports ..* *
For additioal sports news see
pages eight and nine.

ner across the finish line in the
100 with little space between the
first and fourth men. Byberg
and Luis Childs, 400 yard free-
styler, were the lone upperclass-
men making the trip, all the
nest of the men being freshmen.
Brenner's time was slowed in
the 100 due to the fact that he
missed all three of his turns, twice

HIGH JUMPS-Paul Geyer (14) and Leo VanderKuy (8) display
the aggressive form which the Wolverines showed on rebounding,
in their 40-37 victory over Marquette as they battle for the ball
with Grant Wittberger (46), Hilltopper's 6'7" Center.

Martin, varsity free-styler, and
Don Hill, freshman, will challenge
Benner in the 50 yard free-style.
** *
CHILDS will face varsity swim-
mer Wally Jefferies in the 400 in
the coming AAU meet. Another
standout in this event will be Bur-
well Jones, a distance man from
Detroit.
The AAU meet which official-
ly inaugurates the Wolverines'
season and Coach Matt Mann's
26th year as coach of the Mich-
igan natators will attract an ar-
ray of stars from the state of
Michigan.
The diving competition will be
keen with Jim Hartman of this
year's squad facing George Eyster,
leading diver of last year's team,
and Alex Canja, captain of the
1947-48 team. John Davies, Olym-
pic performer for Australia, and
Rusty Carlisle, both present brest-.
strokers, will meet Charlie Moss
from the 1949-50 team in the
(breaststroke attraction..

Michigan in New oce Loop

end of the pool. He has previous-
ly recorded times of under 52 sec-
onds for the 100 yard free-style.
* * *
CHILDS, a sophomore, scored a
victory in the long 400 yard race
with a 4:37.3 time. Barry Way-
brum and Ed Burrows placed sec-
ond and third, respectively, in this
test. 1
All of these men will get their
second look at competition in the
17th Annual AAU meet at Ann
Arbor this Saturday. Entries are
expected from Michigan State
and a number of athletic clubs
in Detroit.
Benner expects to see stronger
competition this Saturday than he
saw last week in Detroit. Dick

MICHIGAN (40) G F PF TP
SkalaF..............3 0 2 6
Gutowski F .............. 0 0 0 0
GeyerF.......3 00 6
Olson F ................ 1 0 0 2
VanderFKuy C.......... 5 2 3 12
L. Smith G ............ 0 0 0 0
Putich G .............. 4 2 0 10
Murray G .............. 1 2 2 4
Totals ............. 17 6 7 40
Halftime score: Michigan 23, Mar-
,quette 23.
Free throws missed: Marquette -
Schramka, Wittberger, Powers 2;
Michigan-Skala, Geyer 2, Vander
Kuy, Putich, Murray.

As soon as the finishing touches
can be added, a Midwestern Col-
lege Hockey Conference will be set
up with Michigan counted as an
unofficial member.
Since the Big Ten has refused to
recognize the new league, West-
ern Conference teams are forced
to submit to unofficial member-
ship.
MICHIGAN STATE and Minne-
sota are the other Big Ten schools
that have accepted unoffical

membership (Minnesota's accep-
tance is still tentative, however)
in the seven team league that will
also include Michigan Tech, Col-
orado College, Denver University I
and North Dakota.
As far as the Big Ten is con-
cerned, no such thing as the new
league exists, but Michigan's
Athletic Director H. O. "Fritz"
Crisler said "if Western Con-
ference teams wish to play
other teams and have the re-
sults entered onany standings
that might be set up, it would
be perfectly okay."
Thus Big Ten teams can parti-
cipate in league play but are not
permitted to commit themselves
to either a definite schedule or a
constitution and by-laws which
tie league may set up.
THE NEW conference will func-
tion similarly to other hockey
leagues in that the leader in the
standings will be determined on
a point basis (two points for a
win, one point for a tie and noth-
ing for a loss).
A maximum of 12 games, two
with each opponent, will be per-
Limit Hockey
Ticket Sales
To Game Day
Tickets for Michigan's home
hockey games will no longer be
subject to advance sale but will
be limited to distribution the day
of the game, according to Ticket
Manager Don Weir.
Both student and reserved seat
tickets may be purchased at the
Ticket Office in the Athletic Ad-
ministration Building from 8:30
to 4:30 on Friday for the game
that evening and from 8:30 to
12:00 on Saturday for games that
night.
STUDENT TICKETS are $.60
each and reserved seat tickets
$1.50.
In addition, tickets may be
bought at the Coliseum box of-
fice the night of the game from
5:00 on. All home games start
at 8:00 p.m.
The policy of limiting hockey
ticket sale to the day of the
game was instituted after it was
found that last year's policy lead
to unequal and unfair distribu-
tion.

mitted to be recorded on the
standings. Thus, with teams
that might be playing each other
four times in home-and-home
two-game series, the results of
the first game of each series will
be recognized in the standings.
Presumably the champion andj
runner-up in league play would
receive bids as the West's repre-
sentatives in the NCAA hockey
championship playoffs with the
two top teams from the East.
AS A RESULT of the Big Ten's
stand in regard to the league,'
Western Conference teams are
not required to comply with the
hockey circuit's schedule ruling
that member teams play each of
the other teams in the league on
a home-and-home basis.
Thus Michigan still retains
complete freedom in arranging
its hockey schedule to include
the teams that it wants to play
and where it wants to play
them.
It happens that the Wolverines'
present schedule includes all the

teams now listed in the league, but
Michigan is not obligated to play
these teams in the future nor to
play them at home one year and
away the next, as the league re-
quires.

CLOSING OUT
Fine ORIENTAL RUGS
GIVE an unforgettable Christmas gift for the home and your be-
loved ones. All rugs are marked at low prices even though market
prices are rising. Now every one can afford to buy one or two of
these hand woven pieces which bear centuries-old designs, luster
and charm.
THESE are choice scatters, hearth-rugs, runners, mats, genuine
French Aubusson wall-hanings. Living, dining-room and library
c rugs too. -
s to OPEN ALL DAY AND EVENINGS 'TIL 8:00
N. L. MANGOUNI
Cleaning and repairing by native experts.
334 S. Fourth Ave. Phone 6878

I

I

NON
AMERICA'S LARGEST AND F INEST LOW-PRICED CAR

J

Electronics
Appliances
Affiliated Manufacturing

h l La
Do p

imp
partmeW

FF-Iii

Air
Conditioning

r

Ig

Construci
Materials

reasons why college graduates
8at G.E. find work that they lke

*micao

SERVING YOU
THE KEY
TO TOP VALUES
Ng
Unlock the door to
opportunity! Do your
buying and selling
. through want ads for-n.
values, savings, pro-
fits! Start the WANT-
AD habit now!
PLACE YOUR ADS TODAY!

IN ALL THE THINGS YOU WANT!
NEW Longer, lower, wider NEW Luxurious Modern- EW Glare-Proof Safety-Sigh
- look! ""Mode interiors! instrument panel!

Come in . . . see this big,
beautiful,- finelr balanced
Chevrolet for 1951 . . . re-
freshingly new in all the
things you want, yet thor-
oughly proved in every phase
and feature . . . and you'll
agree it's America's largest
and finest low-priced"car.
Come in and see it at your
earliest convenience!

If

Strikingly smarter
NEW Fisher Body styling!

NEW~i Jumbo-Drum brakes Improved, easier
.NEW -largest in field! NEW Center-Point steering!

,a seeking to place college grad-
uates in jobs they will enjoy doing,"
M. M. Boring, manager of the Tech-
nical Personnel Divisions, said re-
cently, "we at General Electric find
our work made easy by the diversi-
fication of the company's business.
"We tell a newcomer to look
around, to work in several different

building of big turbines and elec-
tric locomotives, give him plenty of
room forhis search.
"Engineers, chemists, physicists,
and mathematicians, as well as lib-
eral arts graduates, all find work
here that they can be interested in
and can do with enthusiasm.
"Th;,r hili. to fi.d~ at.cf;n&;-

MORE PEOPLE BUY CHEVROLETS THAN ANY OTHER CAR!

Irs

T IM E - P R OVE D
POWER
Automatic Transmission
-proved 'by over a bi;rin miles of performance in

-"I, F
.4-4
.~ Y

f.

,/

F

WWI

1 "- ---

G{ 4 --' "Y41 .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan