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December 06, 1950 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-06

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1950

THlE MICHIGAN DAILY'

PAGE

Festive
Candles.. .
Wax Figures, Scents
Provide Atmosphere
By PAT SMITH
The soft glow of candlelight,
sprigs of evergreen boughs placed
around the base of candles, a twig
of mistletoe appropriately hung,
and low background music helps;
to make up the Christmas holiday
atmosphere.
There are few times in the year
when candlelight is more appro-
priate. Christmas candles take all
shapes and forms.
* * *
SOME GIVE OFF a delicate
pine scent when burning. Others
take on appearance of jolly old
St. Nick himself, or angels, choir
boys, snow men, and many other
familiar holiday symbols.
Often a single plump candle
is left burning near the door-
way to welcome visiting carol-
lers and guests. Or large twin
candles may be placed over the
fireplace to add to the Yule-
tide decorations.
For those who would like to
make use of the many partially
burned or warped candles that
may be carefully packed away,
new candles may be easily made.
* * *
THE PROCESS of making new
candles from old ones can be pro-
fitable and fun. Hand-made
candles are certainly a novelty
in this age of manufacturing and
make unique gifts to say nothing
of the money saved.
The first step in making
candles is to assemble all avail-
able old candle stubs and carve
them into chips to be melted.
The wicks should be salvaged
so that they can be used in the
new candle.
While the candle shavings are
melting, coloring can be added.
Bits of regular wax crayons may
be used for coloring and almost
any shade can be obtained.
NEXT, THE candlemaker should
consider the shape that he desires.
Jello molds filled with about an
inch and a half of melted wax
create a flower-like candle. Cy-
lindrical or square tin cans make
good molds for larger candles. Al-
so a test tube or base of a milk
shake container has been used
successfully.
In case one is artistically in-
clined, he may choose to mold a
large mass and carve it into a
Santa Clause or some other fig-
ure.
Many interesting variations may
be achieved, depending on the dif-
ferent kinds of containers avail-
able for molds and the ingenuity
of the candlemaker.
* * *
AS SOON AS the melted wax
has been poured into the mold,
the wick should be inserted. It
can be held in place by tying one
enl to a pencil or kitchen knife
and placing the pencil over the
mouth of the mold.
Then, of course, the nearly
completed candle must be al-
lowed to cool. After cooling, the
finished product may be re-
moved from the mold by gently
heating the container until the
candle will slip out.
The small flower-like candles
made from a jello mold can be
used in a center-piece arrange-
ment. They are very effective
when floated in a large shallow
dish, perhaps set on a mirror and
with greens around the edge.

Signs

Mark

Holida

UM-M-M GOOD:

y

S

Turkey, Stuffing, Fruit Cake,
Traditional Part of Christmas

'TIS THE SE ASON:

i

Gala Decorating Effects Se(
On Trees, Presents, Houses

n

By JANICE JAMES
"Deck the halls with boughs of
holly," and even as the Yuletide
spirit prevails it is necessary to
see that the halls are the objects
hung with the mistletoe and me-
tallic angels, not the erstwhile
decorator.
Oftentimes, the joys of Christ-
mas and its festivities are over-
looked after painful encounters
with thumb tacks and hammers.
* * . .*
ALL IS NOT in vain, though,
for there is hardly a home in ex-
istence which doesn't improve its
appearance one hundred per cent
during the holiday season.
Decorations may range all
the way from the ever popular
mistletoe to the current trend
for metallic angels and Christ-
mas trees. The mistletoe always
serves its purpose better when
hidden in surprising and start-
ling places!
After the man of the house has
finally erected the Christmas tree,
amidst great grumblings, and dis-
turbances of the furniture ar-
rangements, it is a good idea to
ask him to snip off a few of the
branches in the thicker parts of
the tree.
THE CUT* BRANCHES may be
used to decorate mantles, tables
and even under the tree itself.
Many families follow the
practice of serving egg nog and
buffet dinners on Christmas
Eve, and the tree branches may
also be used as decorations on
Flowers Prove
PopularGifts
Novel Centerpieces,
Corsages Featured
Flowers and greenery, in the
form of bouquets, wreaths, center-
pieces and corsages, make popular
Christmas gifts and cheerful dec-
orations for the home during the
holiday season.
Featured corsages for this yule-
tide will no doubt be made of the
traditional Christmas poinsettias
or chrysanthemums. A novelty
corsage is easily improved with a
gay cluster of acrons tinted white
and surrounded by red berries,
Christmas fern and a small red
bow.
Flowers and greenery also do
their part in carrying the holiday
atmosphere into the home. The
front door may be adorned with
wreaths or with clusters of hem-
lock, spruce or pine, tied with col-
ored ribbon.
Inside the rooms above the man-
tel-piece or in any appropriate
place, loops of hemlock, laurel or
ground pine may be draped. Flo-
wers or plants, placed in a conven-
ient spot in the room, will add to
the festive spirit.
Evergreens, acrons and red ber-
ries surrounding red candles will
add cheer to the holiday dinner
table.
Last, but definitely not least, is
mistletoe above the doorway to
make the Christmas decorations
complete.

the table, interspersed with
gaily colored metal balls.
Speaking of the Christmas tree
itself, back in the days of the
bustle and handlebar mustache,
decorations were planned weeks in
advance of the trimming.
S *
CRANBERRIES and popcorn
were strung and wrapped around
the tree, popcorn balls were made
and cookies and candy canes add-E
ed their bit to the tree's festive
appearance.
Now the bustle doesn't rustle
and the tree is usually bought
the last few days before Christ-
mas, but the decorations are
still planned in advance.
Even the presents, themselves,
are used to dress up the tradi-
tional green invader. Small gifts
may be wrapped in plain shop-
ping bags decorated with a giant
head of Santa Claus, or even cari-
catures of members of the family.
Money may be inserted in the
Christmas balls which are then
painted with the words, "Break
Me."
SOME FAMILIES make a prac-
tice of collecting decorations from
other lands and each year they
add a new one to their ever grow-
ing collection.
Moving out into the colder
elements, many neighborhoods
even carry their festive decora-
tions outside. In addition to
stringing lights over their out-
door trees and shrubbery, they
dress up their house fronts
and doorways.
A large yard is especially invit-
ing for a Santa Claus outlined
in lights complete with sleigh and
reindeer. Then too, there are the
gigantic Christmas bells which
cover the whole side of a house
and swing back and forth while
playing Christmas Carols. Houses
situated on a corner of a block
often have a single electric candle
placed in each window.
Even though members of the
family may disagree and hardly
be on speaking terms, once the
decorations are up and peace
again reigns, they usually relax
and enjoy the holiday spirit and
begin to plan improvements for
next year's project.
Table Cloth
Local stores are featuring a no-
vel table cloth this year designed
especially for the holiday season.
The cloth, luncheon table size, is
decorated with a red and green
poinsetta design and is matched
with similar napkins. It makes an
appropriate Christmas gift or can
be used when entertaining during
the holidays.
GIFT WRAPPING
It's the frilly bows and fancy
paper that proclaim the Holi-
day Season. Any charge?
not at
BALFOUR'S
1319 South University

Xmas Cards...
Artistic Yule Folders
Carry Greetings;
By MAXINE RYCKMAN
How many ways are there of
saying, "Merry Christmas and
Happy New Year?"1
The number of ways seems to
be almost limitless. Year after
year, just when it seems that all,
of the possibilities must be nearly
exhausted, greeting card manufac-
turers come out with new ways to
express age-old holiday sentiments.
*' * *
ONE GREETING CARD com-
pany is now employing the skills'
of Winston Churchill (in his ca-
pacity as an artist), Grandma Mo-
ses, Edgar Guest and Norman
Rockwell to give its Christmas
cards a touch of distinction.
Modern art is begin:ring to vie
with productions of the works
of old masters for a place in
the fantastic world of Christmas
cards.
Some cards seen in the shops
this year require a second glance
before they are recognizable as
Christmas greetings. Others are
only moderately modernistic and
carry out Yuletide motifs with
splashes of color and unusual de-
signs.
Among the cards that unfold
and unfold until they reach a
relatively enormous size, is one
that tells the tale of the rein-
deer who went on strike because,
as they claim on the front of
the card, old St. Nick is unfair
to his coursers. The narrative
finally ends on a happy note,
with an appropriate wish for
the reader's holiday happiness.
Religious motifs are being car-
ried out as beautifully as ever on
greeting cards this season. Black
and white drawings of the Mo-
donna and Child are especially at-
tractive and expressive of Christ-
mas sentiment.
SOME CHRISTMAS folders cre-
ate a three dimensional perfect by
unfolding in such a way that they
resumble a shadow box. Others are
decorated with velvet, feathers or
lace.
For the more sophisticated
person there is a plain black
card, bearing the one word
"Noel" printed in gold on the
front.
In spite of the competition, tra-
ditional holly, Christmas trees,
winter scenes and similar designs
do not seem to have been swept
by the new motifs.
Which would seem to prove that
"Merry Christmas" is "M e r r y
Christmas" no matter how it is
said.

By DOLORES SILVER f
Each year during the Yuletide
season a student's thoughts nor-
mally turn to visions of a sump-
tuous Christmas dinner at home."
The more fanciful can almost
smell the many tangy aromas
emerging from a busy kitchen,
and their illusiveness intrigues
them all the more.
Strangely, these aromas are not
far differentsfrom those of
Christmas dinner cooking 150
years ago.
IN THOSE DAYS a British
Isles Yuletide dinner would have
begun at any time from 3 to 6
o'clock. When the guests assem-
bled in the candlelight dining
room, the first course would al-
ready have been placed on the
mahogany table.
There would,, be succulent
goose, roasted caramel brown
and stuffed with mashed pota-
toes or bread crumbs, highly
seasoned.
Besides, there might also be
roast turkey with links of home-
made sausages. At either end of
the talbe would be tureens filled
with mock turtle and oxtail soups.
Domestic meat and fowl prepared
in a variety of tempting forms
would also be offered.
* - *
SIDE DISHES of potted wheat
ears, black caps, forced pig's ears,
lambs' tails a la bechamel and
matelote of eels, were only a few
of the intriguing delicacies of the
day.
Nun's, Dundee, and Shrews-
berry cakes were the popular
desserts.
No startling changes in Christ-
mas habits have occured since
those days.
A TYPICAL DINNER today
'consists of roast turkey with fla-
vorful stuffing and gravy, squash
and hot rolls. Perhaps a tomato-
clam consumme might be added.
Andcertainly, mashed and sweet
potatoes would not be omitted.
Rice and plum puddings and
fruit cakes have become Ameri-
c a n traditions through the
years, while Hot Toddy and Egg
Nog remain combined holiday
and cold weather beverages.
Festively colored candy and as-
sorted nuts are other favorites.
In addition to these traditions
many homes partake of rare and
fascinating edibles during the fes-
tive season. Pheasant heads the
list of delicacies suggested by one
magazine.
ALSO INCLUDED are Javanese
pearl tapioca, Curry powder, Chut-
ney, Turkish cracked wheat, Chi-
nese black beans, Herring in sour
cream and Chablis.
Suggested for C h r is t m a s
breakfast are crispy pineapple
waffles, frosted cranberry cock-
tail, and a variety of breads and
spreads.
Oyster stew, popcorn rolled with
lingonberries, and steaming cof-

fee are recommended for a snack
after caroling.
Imaginative housewives have
concocted tempting recipes for
odd-sounding cookies and cakes.
WeisseuZurich Leckerli, a mixture
of almonds, lemons, and other
things; Kifflrs, nut-filled cake
rolls; Panettone, plum cake with
Christmas fruits and nuts; and
Belgardin Brod, cookies of orange,
lemon, and cinammon are some of
the delicacies.

J 7 H ,
BEAUTY SHOP
"The Fifth Ave. Shop"
Featuring
Holiday Hair Styling
by
EVERETT C. BARNES
Detroit Stylist, Tuesday
only .
Specializing in Hair Styling,
Shaping, Permanent Waving

215 S. Fifth Ave.

Phone 7249

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OUSINS
!BEA UTIFUL
ACCESSORIES
for the
LADY
GIFTS.
that are
ALWAYS
WELCOME
ALWAYS
WANTED
at
J. H. CousinS

samanna

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with SWEATERS

Delicate nightgowns in many flatter-
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maize, black . . . sizes 32-38.
89 ' to 15"

I'

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Ladies' and Misses' ALI WOOL
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Regular $2.98 to $6.95
2Specialal f$.98
BOXED EMBROIDERED PILLOW CASES
Excellent Value. Regular $2.69 and $2.98
SPECIAL $1.98 a
EMBROIDERED ENGLISH NETo
DRESSER SCARFS
Embwidered muslin in cream and white.
Regular Price $2.98 to $6.95

... when

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Sweaters
we
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Net and lace-trimmed
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SWEATERS

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Luscious HALF-SLIPS
Sizes 22-30
495 to 795

o4.y
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FROM "JERRETS" san-for-lan
(sanforized wool) on to nylon,
right up to precious imported
cashmeres . . . by Catalina.
SILHOUETTES . . . from bat
wing sleeves to classic cardi-
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COLORS , . . from white and
delicious pastels to black.
THE NYLONS or wool pullovers
from 5.95.

. ....... . ". ... $10.95
- * **- * ** * $17.95

Also: COMFORTABLE NYLON PAJAMAS .
Pastel shades . . . sizes 32-38 .......
LOVELY NYLON ROBES in navy and
red . . . sizes 10-18 .... - --

REMEMBER: A small deposit will hold your purchase till Christmas.

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