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September 26, 1950 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-26

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PAGE TIN THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- 1g"i

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UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
72nd ANNUAL CHORAL UNION SERIES

HELEN TRAU BEL, Soprano . .
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,

Thursday, October 5

Speech Aid
To Be Given'
By Clinic
Aid for persons handicapped by
speech and hearing defects will
be available this fall through a
special program planned by the
University Speech Clinic.
Classes will begin tomorrow for
people who have lost the ability
to comprehend or produce lan-
guage as the result of a brain in-
jury, according to Dr. Harlan
Bloomer, clinic director.
THE 12-WEEK rehabilitation
program in this field will include
courses in reading, writing, busi-
ness arithmetic, spelling and cur-j
rent events, as well as classes inj
speech production and usage, Dr.
Bloomersaid.
He explained that si'ecial at-
tention will be directed toward
the social and recreational needs
of the afflicted persons.
Adults handicapped by stutter-
ing, cleft palate, articulation,
speech problems accompanying
hearing loss and other voice de-
fects, such as those accompany-
ing cerebral palsy, can enroll for
an intensive eight-week course be-
ginning Monday, October 16, ac-
cording to Dr. Bloomer.
* * *
HE ANNOUNCED three similar
six week courses for children, dif-
ferentiated according to age
groups. The first started early this
week.
Two ten-day courses will be
available for persons suffering
from loss of hearing, Dr. Bloom-
er said.
The Speech Clinici part of the
University's Institute for Human
Adjustment, will accept written
requests for enrollment in these
courses. Dr. Bloomer said.

IN FIELD TO STAY:
TV To Bring 'U' Classroom into Home

By DAVIS CRIPPEN and see what develops. But," he
The. possible University of the added, "we're in the field to stay."
future-with its classrooms the "We're not going to try and
living rooms of the students and: educate everyone under the
its teaching presented by televi- sun," Prof. Garnett Garrison, of
sion-will get a li-mited tryout this the speech department declar-
fall when the University presents ed, "but still our most optimis-
a program of adult study courses tic prediction may be conser-
over WWJ-TV, Detroit. vative. The potentialities are
University officials running the! tremendous."
project, scheduled to launch its As University Director of Tele-
hour-long, once a week course on vision Prof. Garrison will be in
Oct. 29, aren't making any ex- direct charge of the programs for*
travagant claims for the project, the University. WWJ-TV, in addi-'
however. tion to furnishing the facilities,
will also give University faculty:
DEAN Hayward Keniston of members and students aid in all
the literary college, who headed aspects of the program's produc-
a committee set up to study the tion.
possibilities for the University * * *
educating by television, would on- THOUGH THE definite sub-
ly say, "We're going to try it out jects to be presented will not be

ter has been tentatively set for 14
weeks.
* *..
THE SECOND 20 minutes will
treat subjects more closely con-
nected with everyday life, such
as home buying or recreation.
These courses will run half a se-
mester each.
Students will enroll in these
TV-taught courses by. sending
in a nominal fee to the Univer-
sity. Credit gained wil be in
the form of certificates, not
regular academic hours. Cor-
rection of the TV students' pa-
pers will be handled by the
Univerity Extension Service.
iThe last third of the program's
hour will be the University's show-
case. Here the school will show
what goes on behind its scenes.
A distinct possibility-forone of
the first showcases, Prof. Garri-
son said, is the story of tle Uni-
versity' cyclotron. Other possi-
ble shows might be built around
the Marching Band or the Union
Opera.
* * *
. SINCE THERE is no campus
television studio, the programs
will have to originate in the De-
troit studios of the TV station.

Charles Munch, Conductor
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA,

George

Szell, Conductor

4

SOLOMON, Pianist

" " -e

. unday,October 22
* . Sunday, November 5
. Monday, November 20
ND . Tuesday, November 28
ESTRA,
tor . . Sunday, December 3
- . . . ThursdayJanuary 11

POLYTECH CHORUS OF FINLA
ROYAL PH I LHARMON IC ORCH
Sir Thomas Beecham, Conduc
ERICA MORIN1IViolinist

I ;rtLecture
To BeGiven
The glamour and fascination of
the famous 17th Century Spanish
painter, Francisco Zurburan, will
be brought to campus in the first
of a series of lectures presented
by the Department of Fine Arts.
Scheduled- for Oct. 31, the lec-
ture will be given by Marie Luisa
Caturla of Madrid who is a spec-
ialist on Spanish art and hasal-
ready written a book on Zurbu-
ran. Miss Caturla is currently
touring the United States speaking
on Zurburan's work.
Fancisco Zurburan was a
painter in the true baroque style
who worked with strong contrasts
of dark and light. His portraits
and religious paintings are famous
for their dramatic and emotional
quality.
The lecture will be illustrated
with slides.

COMPLEX TANGLE:
Foreign Students Face
Bewildering Problens

made known until early next
month, the basic format of the
program has been worked out. }
Each hour will be divided into
20 minute segments.
The first period will be de-
voted to lecture courses in such
academic subjects as history,
music, and the natural sciences..
In this period, courses will run
a full semester.
The length of the first *mes-'

HOROWITZ, Pianist . . . . . . Friday, January 19

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
Raphael Kubelik, Conductor . . .
HEIFETZ, Violinist . . . . . .

. . . Sunday, March 4

Wednesday, March

14

SEASON TICKETS: Block A, $16.80; Block B, $14.40; Block C, $12.00.
SINGLE CONCERT SALE Begins Sept. 27
$3.00- $2.40 -$1.80
FIFTH ANNUAL EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

n Make a cate
To look smart this semester a
Get a head start on beauty,
Call today
for an appointment.
Q'ft VA
0 .taebter IBeau ty J"hoP
601 EAST LIBERTY a
v n m< <=0=>=<=0 0

11

LAURITZ MELCH IOR, Tenor. . .

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
Charles Munch, Conductor. . . .W
MYRA HESSPianist'. . . . . . . . T
DON COSSACK CHORUS . . . .
Serge Jaroff, Conductor
CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,

Tuesday,
ednesday,
uesday, N

October

10

October 25

ovember

14
15

If the experiences of orientation
week befuddle the average fresh-
man or even, on occasion, the old-
timer, the University's new for-
eign students are doubly bewil-
dered.
Most of them have no place to
live and many of them are faced
with eating problems while get-
THE INTERNATIONAL Center
is working full-time to handle the
Orobls s of foreina ltrue a or
visael difficultisoe Averion
and university life.n
The biggest problem is hous-
SenTrNIrad
pets Offe d
ROTCPlan
Senior and graduate veterans
with no ROTC training may still
enroll in the new ROTC two-se-
mester training program leading
to a reserve commission in the,
Army or Air Force, University
ROTC instructors announced yes-
terday.
Those applying and selected for
the curtailed course will take five
hours of advanced ROTC training
for two semesters. After complet-
ing six weeks of compulsory RO-
TC summer camp in 1951, gradu-
ates will be presented their Sec-
ond Lieutenant commissions.
g'o qualify, applicants must
have had. honorable active duty
of 12 months in any branch of the
Armed Forces. In addition, enroll-
ees must pass a screening test
that includes a standard physical
exam, and must not have reach-
ed 28 years of age at the time of
initial enrollment in the course.
Before entering the program,
candidates must also agree to
serve on active duty for two years
if called by the Department of
teArmy or the Air Force de-
partment.
The program as announced is
effective only for the 1950-51
schol year, ROTC instructors
added. Enrollment at the begin-
ning of the second semester will
not be possible.
Further information can be ob-
tained at ROTC headquarters at
North Hall.

ing,' according to Charles Ar-
nade, assistant to the director
of the International Center.
The Center works in coopera-
tion with the dormitories to in-
sure that foreign students who
want to live in dormitories can
be housed there.
Steady contact with the State
Department and immigration. au-
thorities regarding student visas,
enables, the Internation l :Center
to assist foreign students in re-'
newing their visas, Arnade re-
ported.
O T H E R PROBLEMS arise
when students holding visas take
jobs. Immigration visas are re-
quired for working students. For-
eign students who want to work
must leave thecountry,-then re-
enter with such a visa.
An emergency fund is main-
tained by" the International
Center to help foreign students
in financial difficulty. Before'
the student leaves his native
country, he must prove he has
enough money to support him-
self, but in many cases these
funds are almost exhausted be-
fore the student reaches Ann
Arbor, Arnade explained.
Although most foreign students
can "get along" with the English
they know, the International
Center holds an English language
service for those who wish ad-
ditional help.
* * *
THE CENTER'S social season
will officially begin with a recep-
tion for foreign students at 8 p.m.
Oct. 7 in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Other regular features of the
Center's program which begins
this week include teas held at 4
p.m. every Thursday at the CeA-
ter, to which American students
are invited. Sunday night pro-
grams include an international!
dinner, featuring dishes of some
nation, followed by te World
Affairs Round Table.
Other projects of the Center
are the Radio Roundtable dis-
cussions,broadcast overWUO&
and later transcribed over the
Voice of America program.
Additional events including ev-
erything from Canasta Circles to
American football explanations
will be scheduled during the year.
-It is the aim of the Center to try
to give all forejgn students .a
chance to meet American stu-
dents through these activities,
Arnade said.

j

4 z

Monday, January

I acony

cc w1

Thor Johnson, Conductor

Tuesday, February 20

. . -

SEASON TICKETS: Block A, $8.40; Block B, $7.20; Block C, $6.00.
SINGLE CONCERT SALE Begins Sept. 27
$3.00 - $2.40- $1.80
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CONCERTS

coordinates your wardrobe'

1-2-3!

1. washable masterblended wool shirt 10.95

2. pure menswear wool flannel skirt

10.95

3. pure menswear wool flannel jacket 16.95
Entire 3-piece wardrobe 38.85

"MESSIAH" (Handel) . . .

. December 9 and

10,1950

Nancy Carr, soprano; Eunice Alberts, contralto;
David- Lloyd, tenor; Oscar Natzka, bass;
Choral Union and Orchestra; Lester McCoy, Conductor
TICKETS: 70.e and 50c. On sale beginning October 16.
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET . . . February 16,17,18,1951
Josef Roisman Violin; Boris Kroyt, Viola
Jac Gorodetzky, Violin; Mischa Schneider, Violoncello
SEASON TICKETS: $3.60 and $2.40. On sale beginning October -#&
FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL MAY FESTIVAL
SIX CONCERTS. . . . May 3, 4,5, 6,1951
The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, Conductor, and
Alexander Hilsberg, Associate Conductor; University Choral
Union, Thor Johnson, Guest Conductor, and Lester McCoy,
Associate Conductor; Festival Youth Chorus, Marguerite Hood,
ConAutnr Solnits to be announced.

l

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v'., .'...
r,";..;.4

,-2

Here's coordination with a capital
sEE! Everything goes together because
Sacony dyed and designed it all, from first
color dip to last nip and tuck. GLAmouR
Magazine pictures it in color. And such

Here's a smart-as-paint way to draw attention: don
a Judy Bond blouse I You'll find it a styling masterpiece
- v-.-ga an teedmto a y o u lookre tty a ature.

I-

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III

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