100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 26, 1950 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VERBAL BATTLES TO BEGIN:
Elections To Activate Young Politicians

PLANNERS RELAX:

Atom Day Will Spark
Phoenix Drive Opening
ti

SCRIPT TO BE CHOSEN:
Overbeck Struggles with Union Opera

Political activity gets students
down out of their ivory towers,
according to Fran Wakman, '52L,
president of the Young Demo-
crats.
The YD's, along with the
Young Republicans and Young
Progressives represent the various
hues in the campus political rain-
bow. The three groups are now
gathering ammunition for pre-
election battles.
YD's CONTRIBUTION, - Mrs.
Wagman said, will include door-
bell ringing, speech making and
all kinds of campaigning for the
Democratic ticket.
"We hope," she added, "that
if the Young Republicans are
willing we can engage them in
a series of debates pertinent to
the election campaign. We
would especially welcome a de-
bate on the Communism-in-
the-administration issue.
The first Young Democrat ac-

tivity will be a meeting Thursday
for anyone interested in joining
YD or in helping the campaign
of Prof. John P. Dawson, of the
Law School, Democratic candi-
date for Congress from the sec-
ond Michigan district. The meet-
ing will be held at the home of
Mrs. Margaret Price, second dis-
trict Democratic committee chair-
man. Transportation will be
available at 7:15 p.m. Thursday
in front of the Union.
. * s
THE YOUNG Republicans, ac-
cording to Howard Hartzell, '52,
vice-president of YR, also plan a
lively schedule of public discus-
sion and debate concerning the
campaign issues of 1950. Their
program is still somewhat nebu-
lous at the moment, however.
"We want to bring some of
the prominent candidates to
Ann Arbor, but that's all ten-
tative," Hartzell said.
Also on the roster of- YR's fall

activities is revision of the club's
constitution and of its Opportun-
ity State platform.
* * *
THE YOUNG Progressives are
on activities probation for the
fall semester. Since this consists
only of a warning from the Stu-
dent Affairs Committee, the club
has planned a full round of ac-
tivities nevertheless.
Gordon MacDougall, '52, YP
chairman, revealed that the Kor-
ean situation and the McCarran'
anti-Communist legislation are
the issues on which YP's atten-
tion will the centered this fall.
"Our first meeting will be
devoted to orientation on the
McCarran a n t i - Communist
bill," MacDougall said. The
time and place will be announc-
ed in the DOB within a few
days.
"In connection with the Mc-
Carran bill, we'll also discuss the
.recent bill passed by the Legis-
lature creating a 12-man com-
mission to investigate so-called
subversive activities," MacDoug-
all added.

First major step in the Univer-
sity's huge plan to turn the
dreaded atomic bomb into a use-
ful source of energy will be tak-
en Monday when a special Atom
Day program will be devoted to
the Michigan Memorial Phoenix
Project.
The program will serve as a
kick-off for the $6,500,000 fund
raising campaign.
A memorial to students and
alumni of the University killed in
World War II, project funds will
be used to develop peace time ap-
plications of atomic energy.
* * *
FINISHING touches for Mon-
day's program of top national
speakers, special meetings and
symposia are still being added.
Plans for the student and fa-
culty drives which begin Nov. 10
were made during the summer.
Through the combined ef-
forts of local students and fa-
culty drives and national alum-
ni drives, committee officials

DELIGHTFUL MENU
Steaks .!Fish *"Hamburgers
! Chicken in the Basket ! Fountain Service
! Sandwiches of all Kinds
4h & C* RESTAURANT
301 E. Liberty at Fifth-Ave.

&fMY Ju9 C4'(ee Gef
1204 South University
... serving . . .
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
-.-.-fromn --. -
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M.. and 5:00 A.M. to 7 P.M.'
Closed Sundays

1

t
i
.
j
'
r
' ,
i,
s
a
'
T
1
1

I:

t " k
' tj

G

" t l

THE
CLUB .211 STILL OFFERS

LI

E

.-

3 £i4uape IIte44p er zlaq *

-

hope to raise the $6,500,000
goal. All drives are expected to
be completed by the first of
of the year.
The idea for the Phoenix Pro-
ject itself was the suggestion of
former student Fred J. Smith of
New York who predicted that the
project would make the Univer-
sity' the greatest peace-time at-
omic energy research center in
the world.
With the approval of the Board
of Regents and the blessings of
the Atomic Energy Commission,
the plans for the drive were push-
ed ahead at top speed.
* * *
BY DECEMBER, 1948, the fa-
culty planning committee, under
the direction of Dean Ralph Saw-
yer, had made to University staff
members the initial grant for re-
search with atomic materials.
Since then $120,000 has been
allocated to - University re-
searchers from project funds.
When the fund - campaign is
completed this winter, $4,550,000
will be ear-marked to finance re-
search in atomic science. The re-
mainder will be used to build the
memorial building with an audi-
torium, library study rooms and
laboratories.
F . *
THE DRIVE is under the di-
rection of Chester H. Lang, '15,
who has been guiding plans for
the big push since his appoint-
ment in the spring of 1948.
Student and faculty drives are
directed by Marvin Lubeck, '51,
and Prof. William Haber. Lubeck
heads the large student organiza-
tion which is working. out de-
tails of the campus drive.
Expansion of the investiga-
tions by University experts into
every scientific and social phase
of atomic power for peaceful uses
depends on the success of the
drive, officials say.
Paid Advertisement
CAREFUL, MEN !
YOUR SLIP
IS SHOWING
A knothole in a ball park
fence could not create more
curiosity than the peak hole in
the window of the new Laun-
dromat -Half - Hour -Laundry
which is located at 1327 S. Uni-
versity.
As I craned my neck to see
over the shoulders of two wom-
en who were. working overtime
at the peak hole, I heard re-
marks that may mean a new
kind of housewives' rebellion.
"I'm junking my old washer the
day this place opens," and,
"John doesn't know it, but he
will soon be bringing our weekly
washing down here. When it's
so easy I don't see why men-
folks can't help with the laun-
dry.
Feeling sympathetic for this
John person, I decided to inves-
tigate further. I asked Mr. De
Varti, the owner of this new
self-service laundry, if he was
proposing to open a business
that would place the age-old
burden of washday on the
shoulders of men. And if so,
who does he think he is. I was
being overcome with visions of
aproned men scrubbing, rins-
ing and wringing out moun-
tains of dirty clothes, when the
discussion was taken over by
Mr. De Varti.
According to Mr. De Varti,
these self - service half - hour

laundries make washing as easy
as a trip to the library. All you
do is bring your laundry in,
dump it in a coin-operated
Laundromat Automatic Washer
and forget about it. At the end
of a half hour it's ready to take
home -- washed, rinsed and
spun practically dry. If you
want it bone dry, all you do is
toss it in an automatic dryer
and in a matter of minutes it's
ready to be ironed or stored.
"That's all there is to it," re-
plied Mr. De Varti.
Now as a rule I am not of a
suspicious nature, but when I
am told that there is a move-
ment afoot to dump washday in
my lap then I become skeptical
of how easy it's going to be. As
would any red-blooded Ameri-
can man.
So, unfearful of my little
woman's wrath I shall stand on
my constitutional rights and
insist that women be the first
to try this so-called, "workless
way to wash." Then, if it's as
easy as it sounds, I'm sure they
won't mind doing the washing

By BOB KEITH
Gene Overbeck has a job on his
hands.
Starting almost from scratch,
Overbeck, a determined, medium-
built senior from St. Louis, has
set out on a project which will
eventually engulf the entire cam-
pus.
s * s
HIS TASK: turning out the
next Michigan Union Opera at
the end of March. -
Written, produced and acted
exclusively by men students, the
traditional Union Opera takes
a lot of spadework, planning and
organization.
That's where Overbeck comes in.
Picked last semester as general
manager of the next show, he has
been hard at work all summer
studying scripts, lining up an
executive staff and trying to plan
the Opera's road tour next spring.
OVERBECK issued a call for
scripts this spring and eight were
submitted. "These scripts will be
forwarded to last year's director
and to one faculty member for
final screening, and the winning
script will be selected within
about two weeks," Overbeck said.
With that problem nearly out
of the way, another has cropped
up: choosing men to head the
executive committee. "I thought
I had them fairly well lined up
last spring," Overbeck confined,
"But two of my best men flunk-
ed out of school."
Nevertheless he expects to name
a committee within a few weeks,
subject to approval by the Michi-

HOME OF GOOD FOOD
is now open for business.
Serving
ir
$1.00 DINNERS
0V
..UYalso...
COUNTRY STYLE BREAKFAST
Breakfast 7:00-1:30
Dinner 5:00-8:00
Sunday hours 12:00-6:30
929 SOUTH STATI PHONE 9717
l~oo c "" a"C c {c c _"{) <o"> c"""">

gan Union Board of Directors.
s *
IT WILL . also be up to the
Board to name a director for the
show. No official word has been
reported, but a strong possibility
for the spot is Bill Holbrook, the
New York professional who did an
impressive job directing last year's
production and reportedly has
shown a willingness to return.
At any rate the director won't
show up until rehearsals start
at the beginning of next se-

mester. Until then Overbeck will
be in complete charge.
Fully cognizant of his heavy re-
sponsibilities, Overbeck nonethe-
less displays considerable confi-
dence.
OPTICAL SERVICE
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-9116

H ARMQINY RESTA IRAN'f
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
M. W. JOHNSTON, Prop.
"across from the Pretzel .beU"
OPEN - 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 A.M. Daily
FREE FOOTBALL DINNER
Following the original policy of the Harmony, we are continuing to give our
Special Turkey Football Dinner to all Students guessing the score for each
Michigan game. Come in and make your guess of the Michigan-Michigan State
o game soon. No purchase necessary.
HARMONY RESTAURANT-M. W. Johnston, '35 Lit.
O0 ?t tG? CtG? U_ > < U 'Q Of { )="?

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER
6 days a week.. . . . .

t

LUNCH, DINNER
6 days a week

"

. . . 0 .

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER
5 days a week . . . .
LUNCH, DINNER
5 days a week . . . . .

.. . $9.00
. . . .$8.10
"". . .$7.30
s. . . $"6.95

ao U/

SAMPLE DAY'S MENU

Lunch:
Dinner:

Choice of fruit or juice; cereal or egg; sweet roll or unlimited toast; coffee,
tea, or milk.
Spaghetti and meat sauce,,.braised beef with vegetables, country sausage with
applesauce, chicken and rice casserole, or cold plate; unlimited bread; coffee,
tea or milk; choice of three of the following: vegetable soup, tomato juice,
whipped potatoes, potato o'brien, peas and carrots, glazed onions, buttered
wax beans, cottage-cheese pineapple salad, tossed salad, sliced tomatoes,
perfection salad, fruit jello, Italian plums spiced applesauce or chocolate
pudding.
Baked Virginia ham, meat loaf with tomato sauce, breaded pork chop, stuffed
veal bird, or cold plate; unlimited bread; coffee, tea, or milk; choice of three
of the following: whipped potatoes mashed sweet potatoes, fresh frozen
broccoli, Harvard beets, buttered whole kernel corn, Manhattan salad, sliced
tomatoes, tossed salad, cottage-cheese, peach salad,, homemade pie or ice
cream.

BE A LEADERI
Leaders of tomorrow are being made
today-on the college campuses of
America. And the Army ROTC is train-
ing the best of them.
Prepare now for leadership in national
emergency and in the competitive world
after graduation. Get your U. S. Army
Commission, and learn to be aleader of
men in civilian life while you earn it.
Point your path toward success in
business and industry - success and
leadership in the duties of citizenship-
by learning in Army ROTC courses to
make the quick, sound decisions that
count. Of such stuff is leadership made.

CLUB 211, organized and sponsored by economy-minded students, has
brought to its hundreds of members excellent, man-sized meals at the
lowest prices in Ann Arbor.'

JO D. MILLER
211 South State Street

CAFETERIA
Phone 2-8315

FRESHMEN:
Register now for basic Army ROTC training!
QUALIFIED JUNIORS:
Sign un now fh, arlanepd A rrpRWtr,irt

.. - H

- - _ _ - - 111

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan