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November 30, 1950 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

!THURSDAY, INOVEMBE 30, 1950

THIRD COOK LECTURE:
Maclver Says Marxism
BothChallenge, Menace
4> * * *

Letter Describes Brutal
Tactics of Korean Reds

Sow 5tSU O tos

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"Marxism offers democracy two
things at once: a tremendous
challenge and a deadly menace,"
declared Prof. Robert Morrison
MacIver of Columbia University
yesterday at the third William W.
Cook lecture in Rackham lecture
hall.
"'The challenge is whether
democracy can offerenoughse-
curity- to the people so that they
will not give up liberty in the
pursuit of the security that Com-
munism offers them," MacIver
added.
IF DEMOCRACY fails in the
challenge, then American insti-
tutions are periled by the menace
of Communism in all of its well-
known forms, MacIver said.
MacIver pointed out that
triton to Show
Bill ofFilms
The newly formed student film
group, Triton, will present its first
bill of movies at 7:30 and 9 p.m.
at Lane Hall.
The group has been formed to
bring to campus some of the lesser
known modern art films and old-
er films of interest that are no
longer circulating.
The first presentation will in-
clude 'The Potted Psalm,' a sur-
realist experimental film; 'Horror
Dream,' a film visually interpret-
ing a dancer's anxiety before
starting her theater routine; 'La
Rose et Le Reseda,' narrated by
Jean-Louis Barrault and narrated
by Louis Aragon; and 'Poem 8,'
a symbolic interpretation of a
man's love life, seen entirely
through the protagonist's eyes.
s Proceeds from the showing will
be donated to World Student Ser-
vice Fund.
Luss To Speak
E. V. Luss, superintendent of
selling for a larg Detroit depart-
ment store, will speak at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rm. 130 of the Business
Administration Building on how
a large department store prepares
for Christmas.
The talk is sponsored by the
Marketing Club.

PROF. MAC IVER
* * *
economic insecurity is not a
weakness of democracy but of
the democratic public. "Democ-
racy is not inconsistent with a
reasonable security. This is a
matter of special legislation
since a democracy has only to
ask for this economic security in
order to have it," he said.
In tracing the rise of Marx and
his theories, MacIver said that
Marx was not motivated by eco-
nomic reasons but that he was a
man bitterly against the society
that he lived in. He attributed
some of this animosity of Marx's
exposure to the religious preju-
dice of his time.
* * *
MACIVER SAID that the lead-
ers of Communism today are pro-
duced not by the shortcomings of
our capitalism but by the short-
comings of our democracy.
"A feeling of hostilityt in this
country against aliens and
members of minority groups ex-
plains why they tend more than
others to become Communists."
Dwelling more specifically on
Communism as a philosophy,
MacIver said that it is contradic-
tory in its very nature. "The end
it proclaims, how ironically, is hu-
man liberation," he asserted, "but
the means it uses is force, central-
ized, all-controlling, all-dominat-
ing force."
Prof. MacIver will speak again
at 4:15 p.m. on "Democracy andi
the Socialized Economy." This
lecture has been switched from
the Rackham amphitheatre to the
lecture hall.

News of a reign of terror in his
home town of Kwanju, Korea and
of his father's escape from cer-
tain death has reached one of
the ten Korean students at the
University.
In a letter from a cousin in
Kwanju, which is about 150 miles
south of Seoul and 70 miles west
of Pusan in southwest Korea, the
student, who prefers to remain
unidentified, was told of a mas-
sacre of his fellow townsmen by
Communist soldiers several days
before the city was liberated by
UN forces.
* * *
THE LETTER, whichwas writ-
ten on October 18 and was re-
ceived this week, reads in part as
follows: "During the last days of
their occupation the Communists
rounded up and placed in prison
about 1000 citizens. These men
were put in prison primarily be-
cause they had been living too
well. They had offered no resis-
tance to the Communists and had
committed no crime except pos-
T echnic To Be
Sold Today
Sale of the November issue of
the Michigan Technic, engineering
magazine, will continue from 8'
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. today inside the
West and East Engineering Bldgs.
This month's edition contains
the regular departments of the
Technic plus four articles. The
feature article was written by an
engineering manager of a nation-
ally known industrial corporation.
It is entitled "The Jet Engine
Comes of Age,"
Andrew Borysko, '51E, on leave
of absence from the Board of
Transporation of New York City,
contributed a history of the "First
Steel Suspension Bridge," an 821
foot span over the Niagara River.
Thurman Silks, '51E, discusses
"The 'Why' of Battery Materials"
in another article.
YR, YD To Meet
The Young Democrats a n d
Young Republicans will hold a dis-
cussion on the meaning of the re-
cent elections at 7:15 p.m. today'
in Rm. 3D of the Union.

sessing more money than the
average citizen.
"One day for no apparent
reason the Communists selected
about 100 men from among the
prisoners and locked them in
the psison storehouse. These
men had formed the upper class.
Among them were bankers, doc-
tors, lawyers and former city
officials.
"Soon after they were removed
to the storehouse they were sud-
denly swarmed upon by Red sol-
diers brandishing knives and
hatchets.
"It was not long before every
one of the 100 had been merciless-
ly killed.
"THE COMMUNISTS had per-
formed their deed of death with
the slashing weapons in order to
keep the killings as quiet as pos-
sible and prevent the people of
the city from finding out about
the mass slaughter."
But, the letter continues,
"word of the killings did reach
the city and was spread among
the people. Relatives and friends
of the 900 remaining in the pri-
son, fearing that their beloved
would meet a similar fate,
gathered at the prison gates and
cried: 'Give us back our par-
ents, husbands, brothers and
sons'."
The prison guards opened fire
on the growing number of people
surrounding the gates. Almost the
entire city came rusing to the
scene. By virtue of their great
number they broke through the
gates and freed the 900 captives.
THE COMMUNISTS set fire to
the prison. And the soldiers then
proceeded to shoot down every
person they could find on the
streets. A reign of terror pre-
vailed in Kwangju.
But then news spread that
UN forces had landed at Inchon
and that there was a drive on
by U.S. Marines in the south
toward the city. The .news put
an end to the Communist mas-
sacre and they hastily with-
drew from the city. Four days
later UN forces entered Kwanju.
But this did not lessen the
anxiety that had filled the stu-
dent as he read the letter. His
father had been one of the most
notable physicians in Kwangju.

Pies Take
Round About
Way to Daily
Neither snow nor sleet nor bliz-
zards can stay Daily photograph-
ers from their appointed rounds--
at least, not for long.
But last Saturday's blizzard,
which buried most of Ohio in a
foot or more of snow, came close
to burying The Daily's pictures of
the Ohio State-Michigan punting
exhibition. In fact, the four pic-
tures on this page did not arrive
in Ann Arbor until late Tuesday
night.
* * *
ORIGINALLY, 'Ensian photo-
graphy editor Pete Mann, '51, was
scheduled to take pictures of the
game for both The Daily and the
'Ensian. Mann, however, w a s
stranded in Detroit Saturday
morning, and could not even get
to the Willow Run airport where
his plane was grounded.
Daily photography editor Ed
Kozma, '51E, arrived in Colum-
bus at noon on Saturday, expect-
ing to enjoy the game from the
stands. When he found that
Mann was not in town, he im-
mediately contacted OSU ath-
letic publicity director B ill
Snypp and secured a photogra-
pher's sideline pass so that he
could cover the game.
Aided by Daily reporter Leonard
Greenbaum, '52, Kozma managed
to take pictures during the first
half of the game. At half-time, he
found that all further attempts.
.to take pictures were halted by
a screen of ice which coated the
lens of his camera,
So finally you can see these pic-
tures in print. We hope that this
indicates that even The Daily, if
given enough time, can surmount
the obstacles which nature throws
into its path.

- - *

- *

'b

- -

THE DAILY'S FOOTBALL EXTRA IS DISTRIBUTED IN THE OHIO UNION

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A
DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Photos by
Ed Kozma

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OPTICAL SERVICE
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone -91 16
Beau Brummell Ties
Shapely Shirts
Sandy McDonald
Pajamas
Apollo Sportshirts
Pioneer Belts &
Suspenders
Pioneer Billfolds
Roper Sweaters
100% Wool
Coopers Sox
39c up
Cooper Jockey Shorts
Wool and Silk Scarfs
PII
SGabardine Slacks
Gloves-
lined or unlined
Champ Hats
Smithson Suits and
Topcoats

6
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1m A W WI5But as he read on he was relieved
to find out that his father had
suspected the impending fate of
the city's leading citizens and had
fled several days before the
slaughter. He was safe in Pusan
+ ,after escaping from Kwangju and
crossing the UN lines.
a~41t a4Shaw 'Drama
AT Will Continue
BALFO U R'S Shaw's wise and witty comedy,
"Caesar and Cleopatra" will con-
tinue at 8 p.m. today in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
WOULD YOU LIKE TO DO YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING Criticized by Shaw as "not bad
WHERE THE SALES PERSONNEL IS GENUINELY INTEREST- traces thu e love affair etweenthe
ED IN YOUR GIFT PROBLEMS? WHERE COLLEGE TRAINED two monarchs from Caesar's ar-
Srival in Egypt until his depar-
YOUNG PEOPLE KNOW MICHIGAN TASTES AND PREFt re for Rome.
ERENCES? Tickets for the production are
on sale at the theatre box office.
OUR SHELVES ARE BULGING WITH GIFT ITEMS SELECTED , They sell for $1.20, $.90 and $ar
WILL' ~ Special student rate tickets are
WITH YOU AND YOUR BUDGET IN MIND. WE WILL still available for tonight's per-
WELCOME AN OPPORTUNITY TO SHOW YOU HOW WE formance.
CAN STRETCH A SLIM BANK BALANCE TO COVER ALL
YOUR HOLIDAY PURCHASES. C
Three educational movies will be
NUMBER ONE ON OUR GIFT PARADE- presented at 7:30 p.m. in the
AN OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING Rackharr Amphitheater under the
auspices of the political science
department.
They are: "General Election,"
depicting the British electoral sys-
9 49. " C O tem; "The Peoples of the Soviet
Union";and a March of Time film,
1319 South University Phone 3-1733 "The Rise of Hitler's Germany."
The pictures are open to the
__ It3 "public.

WOLVERINES HUDDLE AFTER PRE-GAME "WARM-UPS"

ti
.
_
:4

BUCKEYE VIC JANOWICZ PLOWS INTO MICHIGAN'S DON DUFEK

VULCANS
Reduced Holiday Trae
Special Train to New York and Points East
Leaving 7:40 Friday, Dec. 22
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Special Coaches on Regular N.Y.C. Trains

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