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November 30, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-30

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30; 1950
Dean Urges
Curriculumi
Adjustm ent
Colleges must do more than add
new courses to meet the new vo-
cational opportunities'that are de-
veloping each year, a Conference
on Education audience was . told
last night.
"There must be a willingness
to abandon old curriculum con-
tent and adjust existing programs
to meet new needs, Lawrence K.
Jarvie, executive dean of the
State University of New York, de-
clared.
DEAN JARVIE spoke at the
second session of 100 Michigan
college presidents and other of-
ficials who are holding a two-day
conference here.
Earlier yesterday the educa-
tion conference heard Prof. Sey-
mour E. Harris, of the Harvard
University economics depart-
ment, predict a 30 per cent drop
in college enrollment as a re-
sult of the draft.
Prof. Harris also ventured that
wages would be high enough by
1960 to deter from college many
persons who now seek higher
education purely for purposes of
making more money.
The Conference will end today
with morning and afternoon pan-
el sessions. At 9:30 a.m. President
Gorden K. Chalmers, of Kenyon
College, Ohio, will address the
educators in. Rackham Amphi-
theatre. He will discuss "The Uni-
versal Values in a Broad Educa-
tion."
Iammas

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

TWO WHEEL TREND:

English Bikes Outsell American Models

LARGEST GROUP YET:
Fifty Displaced Persons
To Be Sponsored by'U'

TICKETS AVAILABLE:
Streamliner To Take Limited
Number of Students to Bowl

The American style bicycle will
soon be a thing of the past on
campus-at least that's the the-
ory of one old-time bike expert.
Bennett French, who has been
selling and repairing two wheelers
for 16 years, noted that soon stu-
dents will be riding only the slim
framed English importations.
* * *
"NOT TOO LONG ago English
bicy&es were curiosities here, but
before long the bulky American
models will be the novelties," he
said.
French pointed out that for
utility English bikes are hard
to beat. He explained that they
are lighter, narrower, have less
rolling friction and three speed
gears.
"The gears allow you to sit on
the seat where you belong; you
don't have to stand up to reach
the top of a hill."
Bicycles in this country are de-
signed for appearance more than
utility, French remarked. "Manu-
facturers have gotten to the point
where they hire fashion designers
to dream up colors such as Sum-
mer Cloud White and Luscious
Lavender."
* * *
MOST AMERICAN manufac-
turers are not too happy about
the English cycle invasion, but so
far they haven't done much about
it. Only one company has put out
a bike that equals the English
variety, French said, and that one
is priced way above the importa-
tions.
Although the bicycle dealer is
satisfied with his volume of
business, he worried over thef

* * * *

Bringing 50 displaced persons to
Ann Arbor, the plan of the Uni-
versity student DP committee, will
make this campus the first in the
country to handle any sort of DP
program on such a large scale.
"According to the New York of-
fice of the World Student Service
Fund, through which the plan
would be carried, university com-
munities have been able to spon-
sor a few displaced persons, but
never such a large group," explain-
ed Bush Olmstead, advisor to the
student committee.
"THE OFFICE also hopes to be
able to use the experience of this
campus as an example to the whole
country in organizing such pro-
grams," he continued.
The Ann Arbor Council of
Churches has unanimously agre-

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
THREE GEARED CHAMPION-Bike master, Bennett French,
demonstrates the advantages of an English two wheeler as com-
pared with the those of an American model. French claims that
importations are becoming champions of the bicycle world be-
cause of their great utility.

;i(
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f1o .entnq,

our Dress Shirt Carefully
Laundered for Comfort
anCKPleasure
by

fact that all students don't ride
bikes (he estimated that one1
out of four students own one
of the two wheeled vehicles).
"It seems only time conserving
to ride rather than walk, and I
'k#M#E#
L-"
* t

feel any student who figures out
ways of saving time will eventual-
ly succeed at anything."
As for the diagonal traffic prob-
lem that would result from 100
per cent bike ownership, French
remarked that Smith College has
a special set of bicycle traffic
regulations besides numerous bike
trails.
AT THE University, students do
most of their bike buying when
they return to school in the fall.
But many students purchase them
as soon as nice weather begins.
"The more timid and less
rugged individuals store their
bicycles in the winter, but the
heartier keep them going year
round," French said.
At any time the biggest amount
of repair work comes from punc-
tured tires.
But although most students pre-
fer to let a repairman get greasy
working over a wrecked bicycle,
there are a few who like to tinker
themselves. And a good many of
these are women-"some of whom
even come in looking for work as
repairmen."
Once the student has his bike,
American or English, French
claims he is set for 10 to 15 years.
He has one that is 50 years old,
and it was a trade-in.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

City Council
To Consider
Rent Control
The Ann Arbor City Council will
consider a possible extension of
rent controls at next Monday's
meeting, Alderman Russell A.
Smith said last night.
Ald. Smith, chairman of the
Council's special committee in-
vestigating the problem, spoke
shortly before he and other com-
mittee members met with the
Washtenaw County Rent Control
Advisory Board.
He said that his committee
would present a recommendation
to the Council based on this and
other discussions.
Previously, the Council held an
open hearing on rent control to
hear all the angles, including sta-
tistics presented by Leah Marks,
'52, chairman of Student Legisla-
ture's subcommittee investigating
housing.
Miss Marks reported her com-
mittee's findings on present local
rent levels based on a housing
survey taken of students living in
private rooms and apartments.
Federal rent control will expire
Dec. 31 unless Congress postpones
the deadline or the Council ex-
tends it on a local basis for anoth-
er six months.
Speech 31 Contest
Winners Chosen
Bonnie Sinkule, '53, an Ann Ar-
bor resident, won first place yes-
terday afternoon in the Annual
Speech 31 Contest.
Her subject, dealing with the
merits of college life, was "I came,
I saw, I conquered."
Second place went to Alan
Luckoff, '53, who spoke on "The
Powers of the Public." Other fi-
nalists in the three day contest
conducted at Angell Hall were
Rosemarie Bockman, '53, Nor-
mand S. Naumoff, '53, Charles
Richter, '53, and Bill Yeager, '53.

ed to underwrite the student
committee in giving assurancesf
of housing and jobs to the peo-
ple they will bring over. The plan
was presented to the Council
jointly by the student committee,
working under the Student Re-1
ligious Association, and the1
Council's DP committee.
The committee plans to bring
to this community 50 students of
university level. The students will
be eastern Europeans, refugeesF
from Communism in Russian sate-
lite countries.
"The students will be given no
assurance of getting into the Uni-
versity after they get here," said,
Lois Gauger, committee member.
"We will only assure them housng
and a job."
No restrictions of nationality or
religion will be placed on the
candidates, she continued. The
only stipulation is that they
must be willing to work with
their hands.
The committee has until March
1 to file job and housing assur-
ances for the students in the New
York office. They plan to get the
support of various Ann Arbor
ccmmunity groups, such as churb
organizations, to aid in this.
Arts Magazine
Goes On Sale
December 5
The Inter-Arts magazine, Gen-
eration, will usher in its first is-
sue of the semester Wednesday.
"The original date of publica-
tion, November 28, was cancelled
because of printing difficulties,"
Louis Orlin, Grad., managing edi-
tor, said yesterday.
* * *
CONTENTS of the magazine
will proximate the two issues of
last year. Short stories, essays,
poems and various forms of art
work will compose the $.35 publi-
cation.
"One of the better features
is 'The Private Eye,' by gradu-
ate student John Paterson,"
Orlin said. "It's a critical essay
on trends in modern detective
writing."
Two Hopwood winners, William
Weigand and Sue Siris, Grads.,
have contributed to the issue with
an essay on Calvin Coolidge and
an excerpt from Miss Siris' novel
An American's Europe.
THE MAGAZINE will spotlight
the art work of two students,
Marianne Kull, '52A, and Al Mas-
nick, '51A, in full page spreads.
Another page, by John Haro,
will show plans for contemporary
display.
Other important features of
the publication will be a sym-
posium on present-day trends
influencing modern composers
and a humorous article on how
to stay away from a woman for
two weeks.
An innovation will be a letters
to the editor column. It will con-
tain comments on the arts from
both students and faculty.

Students planning to travel to
the Rose Bowl game by train
from Ann Arbor and return may
obtain a "limited number" of re-
served seats on a streamline train,
the Rock Island-Southern Pacific
"Golden State," according to I.
F. Yund, general agent for the
Rock Island.
The total round trip fare from
Ann Arbor, including federal tax
and the extra fare train charge on
the "Golden State" will be $118.95,
and space is available to Los
Angeles Dec. 26, 27, and 28, and
for the return trip Jan. 2, 3, and
4.
Trains would leave Ann Arbor
at 7:21 a.m. and arrive in Los
Angeles at 7:35 a.m the second
morning.

It's Christmas Time
with ~f4from
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NECKWEAR
SHIRTS
PAJAMAS
SPORT SH IRTS yea
ROBES
SWEATERS '
SCARVES
GLOVES
HOSIERY
JEWELRY'~, <
POCKETBOOKS
HANDKERCHIEFS
BELTS-SUSPENDERS
SPORT COATS
RAINCOATS
WARM JACKETS
GOLF JACKETS
SUITS-OVERCOATS
TOPCOATS
All Gifts Appropriately Boxed
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
"/e Serve to Serve /1qin"
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET

Returning trains would leave
Los Angeles at 1:30 p.m., and
would arrive in Ann Arbor at 7:50
p.m. the second day.
Reservations may be obtained
from E. M. Daly, ticket agent at
the New York Central depot in
Ann Arbor, or from Yund, Rock
Island Lines, 625 Lafayette Bldg.,
Detroit.
For those concerned about tic-
kets to the game, applications will
not be considered until next Mon-
day, according to Don Weir, Uni-
versity ticket manager.
At this time students and facul-
ty members will get first choice.
However, they will not actually
receive their tickets until they
show ID cards and ticket purchase
receipts in Pasadena.

rfi''
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ver ModeI Laundry

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5 South University
627 South Main

814 South State

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