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November 30, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Louis Scores

nimpressive Decision Against Brion

Joe Unable
To Manage
Knockdown
Verdicts of Judges
In Complete Accord
CHICAGO-(A')-Joe Louis hit
the comeback trail with an unim-
pressive but unanimous decision
over Cesar Brion, Argentine cham-
pion, in their ten round battle in
the Chicago Stadium last night.
T h e ex-World's Heavyweight
Champion, who ruled the division
for 11 years with 22 knockouts in
25 title defenses, outboxed the 23
year old South American aspirant,
but failed to show any trace of
his one-time bombs that formerly
laid his opponents low. There were
no knock downs but Brion's face
was a bloody smear at the finish.
He had a cut over the left eye
and a bloody nose.
T H E VERDICTS of referee
Frank Gilmor and the two judges
were in almost complete accord.
The judges voted 55 to 45 for
Louis, with referee Gilmor ballot-
ing 56 to 44 for the former title-
holder.
Louis said after the fight he
was satisfied with his showing,
but that he needed two or three
more fights before he would even
consider facing Champion Ez-
zard Charles again.
"I felt great against Brion, but
my timing was way off," said
Louis.
"I didn't go for a knockout, I
was perfectly satisfied to go 10
rounds. I thought I had him going
a couple of times, especially in
the seventh with a right to the
middle. But I couldn't get the
combination going."
BRION'S HANDLERS said he
hurt his left hand in the second
round.
It was Louis' second comeback
attempt, and at the finish old
Joe's head was bowing low. Louis
used a piston like jab that some-
times showed flashes of his old
time steam to hold command
over Brion. But his famed brown
bombs failed to explode. He did-
n't come close to-scoring a single
knockdown against a slow mov-
ing target.
Louis appeared sluggish and tir-
ed. Although his most ,iolent fury
came in the closing minutes of tait
tenth round. He then opened up
with a two fisted charge which
had the South American lad inf
retreat.

Celley Shifted to Left Wing; Cards Sign
Sophs Earn Starting Berths Marion As

Rose Bowl Loss Would Mar
Golden Bears' Grid RecordI

By KEITH MILLER
When the Wolverine sextet takes
the ice against a powerful Detroit'
Auto Club aggregation on De-
cember 8, two of the three for-
ward lines will be centered by
sophomores.
In a move to give more balance'
to the top line, coach Vic Hey-
liger has shifted Neil Celley to
left wing and has placed sopho-
more John Matchefts in the cen-
ter position. Gil Burford, whose
69 points broke the Michigan
scoring record last season, will be
at right wing.
* * *
ON ANOTHER line John Mc-
Kennell, a sophomore from Tor-
onto, Ontario, will be the center
between left wing Earl Keyes and
right wing Joe Marmo.
The remaining line will have
Paul Pelow in the center slot
between wings Al Bassey and
sophomore Gordon Naylor.
Heyliger has high hopes that
Matchefts and McKennell will
come through to help fill the
shoes of the departed Wally Grant.
In practice, thus far, both have
shown to advantage.
THESE LINES are in the ex-
perimental stage and may be
Carey Named
HSCCaptain
DETROIT-(P)-Big Bob Carey,
Michigan State's placement kick-
ing expert, was named last night
as captain of the Spartans' 1951
team.
His selection was announced to
1,200 cheering Spartan rooters at
Michigan State's annual football
bust here (at the Book Cadillac
Hotel).,*
CAREY was introduced to the
gathering by his predecessor, re-
tiring captain Leroy Crane.
The celebration of State's vic-
torious 8-1 season was intermin-
gled with references-some good
natured and some not so good
natured-to Michigan's selection
as the Big Ten's Rose Bowl nom-
inee.
Toastmaster H a r r y Wismer
termed the gathering "a celebra-
tion to honor the team which beat
'the team that is going to the Rose
Bowl."
MSC head coach Biggie Munn'
said, "We all know they're sending
the second rated team in the state
to the Rose Bowl, but it is okay
with us."

m f1 YLrit oL

'Mr. Shortstop'
To Fill Dyer's

Set
Shoes

NEIL CELLEY
. . . gets new assignment
changed after the first game,
states Heyliger. Despite the fact
that Grant will be definitely miss-
ed and Eddie May and Bob Heath-
cott will fill sagging defensive po-
sitions, the affable coach believes
his scoring punch will be equal to
last season's.
The line of Celley, Matchefts,
and Burford will undoubtedly
spearhead the Wolverine attack
as Burford and Celley ranked
one-two in the individual scor-
ing race in 1949-50. Celley post-
ed 54 points last season. 4
. Detroit Auto Club will provide
the Maize and Blue opposition in
the season curtain raiser at the
Coliseum. The entire slate is as
follows:
December 8-Detroit Auto Club, here
December 15, 16-Princeton Univer-
sity, here
December 21, 22-Western Ontario,
here
December 27-Boston College, there'
December 29-Boston University,
there.
January 5, 6-Minnesota, there
January 10-Detroit Red Wings, here
January 12, 13-Montreal University,
here
January 19, 20-Minnesota, here
February 6, 7-Denver, there
February 9, 10-Colorado College,
there
February 16, 17-University of Tor-
onto, here
February 21-Michigan State, there
February 23, 24-North Dakota, here
March 3-Michigan State, there
March 9, 10-Michigan Tech, here
Hockey Results
Chicago 1, New York 1
Boston 6, Detroit 3

ST. LOUIS - (P) - Shortstop
Marty Marion was named player-
manager of the St. Louis Cardi-
nals yesterday. He immediately
predicted the club would cause
trouble for the other National
League teams in 1951.
Marion's appointment was an-
nounced at an afternoon press con-
ference today by owner Fred Saigh,
who said he settled on Marty at 9
a.m. this morning.
THE LONG, LANKY shortstop
has signed a contract for one year,
Saigh said. Financial terms were
not disclosed.
Twenty five men had been in-
terviewed for the job left open
by the resignation of Eddie Dyer,
who threw in the sponge in Oc-
tober after a dismal season.
The Redbirds wound up the
year in fifth place. It was the first
time they had finished out of the
first division since 1938.
* * *
REPORTS EARLIER today said
the field of potential candidates
had been narrowed to Marion and
Johnny Keane, manager of Ro-
chester in the International League'
the past two seasons.
Marion, who will be 33 years
old in two days, will be the
youngest manager in the major
leagues. He has been with the
Cardinal organization 15 years,
11 of them with the St. Louis
club.
For the past several seasons the
man known as "Mr. Shortstop" has
been bothiered with backc and knee
trouble..
* *
ASKED TODAY if he will con-
tinue to play, he said:
"I don't think I'm through as
a player, but I'll play from the
bench if necessary. A winter's
rest might make a difference."
Marion has had no managerial
experience.
Saigh described him as a smart,
aggressive player.
"After all these weeks of wait-
ing, we've chosen Marty Mar-
ion," Saigh said. "We've had him
in mind all along. ... I think he
will do as good a job as any man
in baseball.
"The new Cardinals will be a
contending club. It will be a new
era for the Cardinals in 1951."

. By ROGER GREENBERG
How good is the California team
that Michigan is going to meet
in the Rose Bowl, January 1st,
1951?
During the 1950 season just
completed they won nine games
and tied one. Here is their record:
Santa Clara 27-9
Oregon 28-7
Pennsylvania 14-7
So. Calif. 13-7
Oregon St. 27-0
St. Mary's 40-25
Washington 14-7
UCLA 35-0
San Francisco 13-7
Stanford 7-7
Up until.their tie with Stanford
last Saturday, the Bears had won
every game in their regular sche-
dule for the last thr -years.
HOWEVER, in Rose Bowl com-
petition they have lost t w o
straight. Northwestern beat them,
20-14, in the 1949 Rose Bowl clas-
sic, and this year Ohio State edged
them out by a 17-14 margin.
California's greatest display of
strength this season was when
they whipped UCLA, 35-0. After
that game Red Saunders, UCLA
coach had this to say about the
Bears: "We were outclassed and
outplayed by one of the best col-
lege teams that I have ever
seen."
Russ Rippe, former Wisconsin

ifornia is as good a club as I have
seen this year. It has an excellent
chance of winning the Rose Bowl
game."
* * *
CALIFORNIA'S COACH is Lynn
(Pappy) Waldorf, former North-
western Wildcat mentor. He is the
president of the Football Coaches
of America Association. Since com-
ing to California three years ago,
he has had a phenominal record,
winning 22 out of 23 Pacific Coast
Conference victories.
About his own team he says,
"It is showing the greatest spirit
UP Names Wahl
The 1950 United Press foot-
ball All - American selections
yesterday named Michigan's
captain, Al Wahl, to a second
team tackle post.
Given honorable mention
were Wolverines Lowell Perry,
Harry Allis, Tom Johnson, John'
Powers, Tony Momsen, Roger
Zatkoff, Charley Ortmann, Don
Dufek, and Leo Koceski.
of any team I have ever known.
Even when it makes mistakes, it
seems to rise as a unit and assist
the offender."
Waldorf dwells frequently upon
the necessity of being "equal to the
occasion." In that respect his
Bears rate on par with Army and

SECRET TO SUCCESS:
Michigan Defense Tops Again;
New Conference Records Set
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO-Michigan's Wolver- records were established in 1950,
ines, winners of three champion- as follows:
ships and one co-championship in (1) Northwestern completed an
the past four Western Conference average of 11.7 passes per game,
gridiron seasons, are an oddity in surpassing the record of 10.7 es-
modern day football, tablished by Indiana in 1946.
They know how to make defen- (2) Wisconsin averaged .545 on
sive football pay off. its pass completions, breaking the
* * * former team mark of .509 set for
FINAL 1950 STATISTICS for Illinois in 1947. Northwestern had
the "Big Ten" released today dis- a .515 mark, which also broke the
close that the Wolverines were the old record.
Western Conference's fifth best of- (3) Minnesota yielded an aver-
fensive team, but it's no. 1 defen- age of 160.8 yards per game to op-
sive unit. ponent's passes, more than the
A review of Michigan's foot- record 139.6 yielded by Michigan's
ball success during the past four 1942 team.
years shows that in each season (4) Iowa average 7.5 penalties
the Wolverines ranked as the per game which added up to 71.3
"Big Ten's" toughest defensive yards each start, both new Con-
team. ference records.

DESPITE THE NUMBER of
"Big Ten" games played in ad-
verse weather conditions, new team
-

m

I

Congratulations!
WOLVERINES
Conquerors of
the West

t
Y
.
li
t

We have a new
shipment of
MICHIGAN SEAL
CHRISTMAS CARDS
Ph. 7177
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St.

The Dascola Barbers

!
i

U

aide, who scouted the y'ear-Bruin Notre Dame for consistent win-
game for the Big Ten, stated, "Cal- , ning teams, prior to this season.
IFORMAL FOOTWVVEAR

I

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COMPLETE DINNER ... 59c
Chop Suey with Rice ... Potato
Salad or Vegetable
Roll and Butter Beverage
J. D. MILLER'S CAFETERIA
211 South State

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