100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 25, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25, WO

THE MICHGAN__A_.
SAUDANOEBE.5,15

GOBBLER'S DAY:

Foreign Students Enjoy

THE
CITY BEAT

ll

Turkey in Local Homes

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
American students are not the
only ones wallowing in the warm
memories of home-cooked Thanks-
giving feasts and traditional fami-
ly fun.
Thanks to the generosity of
dozens of citizens in and around
Ann Arbor, more than 200 foreign
students from a dozen countries
can also retain savory thoughts of
tle gaiety surrounding Thanks-
giving eating.
THROUGH AN arrangement
with the International Center,
students were welcomed into
homes all over town, where they
shared the food and festivities of
the celebrating natives.
Triton Society.
Will Sponsor
Film Series
A new series of art films will
soon be brought to Ann Arbor,
Sponsored by the newly formed
student Triton society, the movies
will be the best in experimental,
documentary and other unusual
cinematic productions, according,
to Clay Bredt, '51 A&D, art di-
rector of the society.
The first of the art film pro-
grams will be shown Friday in
Lane Hall. Included in this pro-
gram will be a surrealistic psy-
chological study, a dance film1
interpreting a dancer's anxiety*
before starting her theatre rou-
tine, a French film on the Resis-
tance movement and a film de-1
picting a symbolic interpretation1
of a man's love.
"The Triton society was formed1
by a group of students who recog-
nized a need for more art film
showings," Bredt said. They have
arranged with a well-known art
cinema distributor to provide
them with productions, and, if de-
mand warrants it, films will be
shown steadily throughout the
year.
Proceeds will all go to the
World Student Service Fund.
"We want to provide campus
audiences with high - class movi'est
which are now too rare in Ann
Arbor," Bredt said.

N-
This is the third year that
the Center has arranged such a
dinner program, and it was the
most successful so far, according
to Robert Klinger, student coun-
selor at the Center..
"This is the first time that we-
could place everyone in private
homes," Klinger said. "And what
is even more gratifying, we had
invitations left over after every-
one had been placed. We really ap-
preciate the fine response that the
community has shown to this part
of our program."
THE PARTICIPATING students
had nothing but praise to offer
for the hospitable families and the
Thanksgiving tradition.
Mehmet Akin, of Turkey, re-
membered the family atmos-
phere and the full table. "It
seemed to me that I was in a ty-
pical American home," he said.
"The atmosphere was like a
holiday, and all day the air
smelled of turkey. I hadn't eaten
any breakfast, and I was glad
when I saw the table. It was
so rich, and the turkey so big,"
he explained.
"After dinner everyone sat
around and talked,; but nobody
could move; we were all so stuffed.
And when I looked around, it
seemed, that my hosts were all
very sleepy, but' smiley," he remi-
nisced.
VERA KOROTON, '52, a dis-
placel person originally from Uk-
rania, spent her second Thanks-
giving celebration in Ann Arbor
Thursday. "The most wonderful
thing about this holiday is the
tradition of the family gathering
together," she said. "The spirit
that you feel is so warm and
friendly."
And Eton Suh, BAd, of Korea,
termed his Thanksgiving feast
the coming of a dream come
true. "When I was in Korea I
once saw a picture in an Ameri-
can magazine which showed a
family seated around a table
enjoying a turkey dinner,' he
said.
"I wondered if anything like
that could ever happen to me,
and Thursday it did. It was like
a dream," he declared.

Fadhil Al - Janabi, University
student from Iraq, was injured
slightly in a two-car crash on
Washtenaw Ave. near the city
limits ,Thursday night.
He was riding in a car driven by
Kamal Abdul Shair, Grad., which
crashedbhead-on into another car,
driven by Elwood L. Cushing of
Ann Arbor. Cushing's son was al-
so injured in the accident.
* * .*
Attorney William A. Lucking
filed a suit in circiit court yes-
terday, charging that Ann Ar-
bor is not a legally organized
city, but "a mere voluntary as-
sociation of individuals."
Iucking asked the court to
force a complete revision of the
city charter to bring Ann Arbor
under the provisions of the
Home, Rule Act, and that the
city's officers be adjoined from
exercising any authority from a
date to be set by the court.
Ann Arbor firemen began a 63-
hour work week last night, fol-
lowing a decision for shorter
working hours given in the re-
cent election.
The hiring of four new firemen
was authorized by the city coun-
cil earlier in the week' to bring
the force up to strength, although
Fire Chief Ben Zahn claimed that
at least six new firemen were
needed.
Engineers Will
At11tend Meeting
Dean Ivan C. Crawford of the
engineering college and eight pro-
fessors of that college will attend
the annual conference of the Am-
erican Society of Mechanical En-
gineers beginning Monday in New
York.
Dean Crawford will speak be-
fore a group of University me-
chanical engineering alumni of
the New York area Thursday.
Prof. Orlan Boston, chairman of
the Department of Metal Process-
ing, will deliver two technical pa-t
pers and also preside over the
Production Engineering session
and the Research Committee on
Cuttling Fluids.
Game Broadcast
University FM station WUOM
will broadcast the Michigan-Ohio
State game at 1:45 p.m. today.

J4ill

sue seew

,, .
=:
>X

I ro rnLions Guard,
'Realm of Wonder'
Behind the never-roaring iron lions guarding the gates of the Uni-
versity Museums Building lies a realm of wonder and knowledge known
chiefly to scientists and a few students required to take an occasional
field trip through the building.
Most students know little more about the museums than the
legend of the lions and the virginity of University women. Thousands
of coeds have filed past the building whiles the lions have maintained
their silent vigil. However, very few of these coeds or their male
counterparts have bothered to go inside.
* * 4 *
THE UNIVERSITY MUSEUMS Building houses four separate mu-
seums. These are: The Museum of Zoology directed by Prof. J. Speed
Rogers; the Museum of Palaeontology directed by Prof. Lewis B. Kel-
lum; the University Herbarium, headed by Prof. E. B. Mains; and

Disp lays

CARLETON W. ANGELL, MUSEUMS SCULPTOR, MEASURES A MODEL FOR A NEW DISPLAY.I

b
A GUIDED TOUR
OF 'U' MUSEUMS

the Museum of Anthropology un-
der the chairmanship of Prof.
James B. Griffin.
Although each is an indepen-
dent unit, all the museums are
devoted to 'a colimon principle
set up by a former director, Pres-
ident Alexander G. Ruthven,
who was connected with the mu-
seums movement for 30 years.
President Ruthven believed that
the museums' collections should
serve a dual purpose and be used
for research as well as instruction.
FOLLOWING this principle the
University Museums have become
widely known among science scho-
lars. The research staff of the four
museums is now as large as the
staff working in the building. Field
workers are constantly collecting
specimens and data, and prepar-
ing them for use.
The Museum of Zoology, for
example, now contains among oth-
er things the largest research col-
lection of North American fresh
water fish in the country, and more
than 1,500,000 insects prepared for
research study.
Museums have a long history
on campus. A University museum
was initiated at the first meet-
ing of the Board of Regents
founding the University in Ann
Arbor in 1837. It has been in
continuous operation ever since.
In 1849 the first groups of ma-
terials were presented to the mu-
seums. Among these were Mexi-
can birds and alligators and fish
of the Caribbean Sea. But, be-
cause no building had been pro-
vided for them, the collections were
stored.
However, when Henry Tappan
became president of the Univer-
sity he set aside the upper floors of
the then newly-constructed Mason
Hall for exhibits. There, the mu-
seums' collections shared space
with the art gallery and the li-
brary.'
* * *
IN 1881 the Natural History col-
lections were moved into a build-
ing of their own. This was what
is now the Romance Languages
Building. With the increased fa-
cilities and prestige given to the
natural history collections, they'
became known as the University
Museums.
The collections made their last
move in 1928 into their present
home, the University Museums3
Building. At this time President
Ruthven was serving as director
of all natural history collections.
President Ruthven resigned in
1936 to devote all of his time to
being president of the University,1
and Prof. Carl E. Guthe succeededl
him.
Prof. Guthe was the last director,
however. When he left for a post

with the New York State museums,
the office of director of all mu-
seums was abolished.
* *I *
THE INTER-RELATING activi-
ties of the four museums are now
handled by an Operating Commit-
tee with Prof. Kellum as chairman.
The committee is made up of the
four 1ruseums' directors and the
Prefect of Exhibits.
In addition to the Operating
Committee, and the staffs of the
four museums, a University staff
serves them all. Included in this
staff is Museums Secretary Miss
Geneva Smith, and Museums
Sculptor Carleton W. Angell.
Although less prominent than
the researeh staff, the University
museums also have an exhibit
division. This is headed by Pre-
fect of Exhibits Irving Reimann.
This staff plans and organizes
exhibits which they feel will in-
terest all, and draws these from
materials of all the University
museums.

.I

OPERATING COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN, LEWIS B. KELLUM,
GLANCES THROUGH A ZOOLOGY RESEARCH BOOK.

11

I

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:30 A.M.: Service, with sermon by the pastor,
"As the Christian Church-Year Ends."
5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Club,
Supper. Program at 6:15, "Sollman, Christian
Painter."
Tuesday at 9:15: Coffee Hour.
Friday, 7:30: Bowling Party.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenow at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director'
Phone 3-4332
10:00rAM.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill at Tappan Street
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Ministe
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Church School-College Age Class.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (Nursery for Chil-
dren). Sermon: "How Much Does a Church
Cost?"
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Jean Garee Bradley, Associate
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 supper at the Congrega-
tional Church. Rev. Bryant Drake, Secretary
of the Department of Higher Education of the
Congregational Church, -will be the guest
speaker.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Nov. 26-.Ancient and Modern Necromancy, alias
Mesmerism and Hypnotism, Denounced.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M. Please notice
the time has been changed from 11:30 to 11
o'clock.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Student Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services in Zion & Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. supper meeting in Zion Parish
Hall-Program following: Thanksgiving Ser-
vice-Rev. H. 0. Yoder, Speaker.
Tuesday, 7:30 P.M.: Discussion Hour at the Cen-
ter-"Church Leadership."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State & Williams
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr D.D.
Student Ministry: Rev. H. L. Pickerill;
Mrs. George Bradley
Director of Music: Wayne Dunlap
Organist: Howard R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Sermon by Dr.
Bryant Drake "And when they saw him."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild Supper. Dr. Drake will
speak on "Compass to Campus."

A
DAILY
PHOTO
FEATU RE
Story by
Lila Ferrance
Pictures by
Carlyle Marshall

The most .popular exhibit ac-
cording to Reimann, is the wild-
life zoo in back of the museums.
T h e s'e particularly appeal to
younger children and University
students who enjoy watching the
bears and snakes.
ONE OF the most interesting ex-
hibits, he feels, however, is the
prehistoric mastoon which was
found in Fort Peck, Montana. An
expedition was sent from the Uni-
versity to bring the specimen back.
This was quite a gruelling pro-
cedure as William Buettner who
was part of the expedition re-
calls. He remembered that It
took eight weeks to chisel the
specimen out of the rocks, and
two years to prepare it for exhi-
bition lying in the actual posi-
tign in which it was found.
Currently the exhibits are un-
dergoing a modernization process
to give them life and color Rei-
mann said. Old fossils are being
supplemented with dioramas in co-
lor showing how, many of these
fossils looked when they were alive
more than 3,000,000,000 years ago.
Much of the artistic work is bein
done by George Marchand of Buf
falo, New York.
In contrasting the old type of
museum with the newer, more col-
orful type, Reimann said, "Mu-
seum exhibits of the past were
generally of a drab forbidding na-
ture. Modern exhibit methods are
intended to sustain the visitor in-
terest and present intellectual fare
in an attractive, simple manner."
"Museums like many other
things exist primarily to be used,"
he concluded, "and we feel that
many more students could profit
from the Museum's activities than
do now."

PAINTING AN EXHIBIT IS A MUSEUM ARTIST, JANET GALLUP.

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No.,Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
10:00 A.M.: High School and Junior High Classes,
Page Hall.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Henry Lewis, S.T.D.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship, Canterbury
House.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmole, D.D.
Wnlf-,eC -- D--

I

11

II

i

.......... ..

'Imam

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan