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November 25, 1950 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-25

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Illini Can Gain Rose Bowl Nod With

'O

*

*

*

*

*

*

VictoryToday
Triumph over Wildcats
W ill Cinch January Trip

ON THE SPOT
By BILL CONNOLLY
Daily Sports Editor

Wolverine Line Holds Victory K(

Backs Can Strike for Distance
If HolesOpen in Buckeye Wall

COLUMBUS, OHIO NOVEMBER 25
HERE'S ONE from the read-it-and meditate department:
If the Thanksgiving holiday hadn't interrupted our printing sche-
dule, yesterday's Daily would probably have read as follows:
"With a possible invitation to the Rose Bowl looming before it,
the Michigan grid squad leaves at 5 p.m. today for Columbus to meet
the Buckeyes of Ohio State in the finale of an up and down football
season.
"The Wolverines will travel by bus to Toledo where they will
stay at the Commodore Perry Hotel and then will board the regular
student train to arrive in Columbus shortly before game time.
Once again a Big Ten title hangs on the outcome of tomorrow's
game, but this time there are two big "If's" connected with the
contest, and with a bid to the Tournament of Roses on New Year's
day.
"One big "if" is if the Wildcats of Northwestern can knock off
Illinois, and, of course, if Michigan can get by Ohio State, then the
Wolverines would be undisputed holders of the crown and the West-
ern Conference's representatives at the Rose Bowl."
* * * *
COINCIDENTALLY ENOUGH, the above quote, purloined from the
November 22nd edition f? the 1946 Daily, is the verbatum account
of the circumstances which added fire to the '46 Michigan-OSU grid
clash.
And down here in Columbus everyone is just as keyed up for
today's game as they were in '46, and in every year, for that mat-
ter. The only detraction from the exact parallel between that
year and this is the fact that Michigan entered the contest in the
favorite's role, sporting a 4-1-1 Conference record. The Buckeyes
of 1946 had won two, lost two and tied another in contrast to their
five-won, one-lost record of this year.
But it is significant that the Bucks' one Big Ten loss in 1950 came
last week at the hands of a determined Illinois team, giving an indi-
cation of what results such determination can produce against a team
previously considered to be invincible. Michigan fans who have been
pouring into this frenzied town since as early as Thursday are just as
convinced as are the Ohio rooters that their team will earn the title
of "The Victors" in today's conflict.
IN WAY OF PROGNOSTICATION, we'd like to be written down
as one who believes in the axiom proven by the Fighting Illini last
week-and by the Bucks who tied Michigan, 7-7, last year to earn a
Rose Bowl bid-that an inspired, determined and aggressive ball team
can undermine the hopes of its over-rated opponents from the first
tackle and block to build up the fire that generates game-winning
steam.
The general uproar and confusion which characterizes this
frantic town is built up to a climatic peak every two years when
the Wolverines come to town ... and this year the Ohio fans are
confident they'll have their first cause for victory 'celebration since
1944 when All-American quarterback Les Horvath led an inspired
Buckeye team in a last quarter march which enabled it to come
from behind and down Michigan, 18-14.
Indicative of that confidence is the added fervor with which the
Ohioans chorus their favorite fight song, which they annually take
out of moth-balls on the occasion of the Michigan-OSU classic. Freely
translated from the barbaric language of the local natives (so that it
can appear in print) this chant is worded: "We do not care a slight
iota for the entire state of Michigan-We reside in Ohooooo."
The usual rebuttal to this from the outnumbered supporters of the
Michigan cause is a rousing version of "The Victors," which is con-
sistantly answered by Buckeye fans, with a verse or two of the Ohio
fight song.
AND THEREIN lies the most ironical tale of all. Midway through
the chorus of this stirring march is placed a heart-rendering "Go
Ohio," to be followed by a pulsating solo by an inspired bass-drum
player. However, bass-drums being somewhat scarce in the local
gatherling places, the solo is substituted with the phrase "58 to 6"
It is not surprising that the Michigan rooters joint the chorus
at this point and with a chuckle chant: "Go Ohio, 58 to six!"
But what is surprising is that even the fourth-year students here
in Columbus seem to be unmindful of the fact that the score of the
aforementioned game in 1946 was: Michigan, 58-Ohio 6
Wisconsin. Needs Three
Cornered Bowl MiracleI

By TED PAPES
At one time this year Ohio State
was rated the best football team
in the nation.
The results of today's game with
Michigan will go a long way to-
ward determining just how good
the twice-beaten Buckeyes are.
AS IS ALWAYS the case when
two contending Big Ten machines
* * *

and Al Wahl speak for them-
selves at the tackle slots. John-
son has done just about every-
thing a lineman can do in his
team's eight games to date, and
has been mentioned by many for
possible national recognition
next year.
Captain Wahl will call the coin
toss for the last time this after-
noon.
S* * *
AL JACKSON and Dick McWil-
liams are the first line defensive
guards. Jackson especially has
been magnificent in protecting the
Wolverines up the middle.
Right behind these six will be
Tony Momsen and Roger Zat-
koff; who have continued the
Michigan tradition of rugged
line backing. They will be called
upon to prevent Janowicz and
the star sophomore quarterback,
Tony Curcillo, from striking by
land or in the air.
Momsen is a senior and Zatkoff

By The Associated Press
EVANSTON, Ill.-Illinois' foot-
ball team may find its roses bloom-
ing in the snow of Dyche Stadium
today.
All the Illini need for a bid to
the New Year's Rose Bowl game
with the Pacific Coast Conference
champion is a victory here over
their traditional intra state rivals,1
Northwestern.
ILLINOIS is expected to win by
one or two touchdowns, despite
foreboding pre-game utterances of
its coach, Ray Eliot--and a weath-
er outlook of freezing temperatures
and snow on the ground.
Eliot maintains that North-
western is much better than its
mediocre season's record would
indicate and that, furthermore,
the Wildcats have the psycholo-
gical edge. This latter, he says,
is due to his team's thrilling ac-
complishment last Saturday in
beating the favored and until-
then seemingly invincible Buck-
eyes of Ohio State.
Eliot fears his boys might not be
"up" mentally for the game to-
morrow because of the tense ex-
citement and hilarious joy inci-
dent to last week's victory at
Champaign.
COACH BOB VOIGTS of North-
western, cognizant of the Wildcats'
underdog situation, has said little
about the game this week. He and
his squad have labored grimly
through rugged daily scrimmages,
disregarding cold and snow alike.
The expected uncomfortable
playing conditions undoubtedly
will have some effect on scoring
in the game. However, Eliot and
his aides have not spared the Il-
lini squad the rigors of winter
at Champaign this week, either,
and the Wildcats should have no
advantage in this respect.
Illinois will be ready with its
new aid dangerous backfield com-

binations: Johnny Karras at Left
Half, Don Stevens at Right, Dick
Raklovits at Fullback and Fred
Major, Jr., at Quarkterback.
Karras still favors a weak ankle
that kept him out of two Big Ten
games this season and hobbled his
steaming speed last Saturday. Nor-
mally a right halfback, Eliot has
switched him to left to make room
for Stevens, who became a star in
Johnny's position during the lat-
ter's absence.
Sooners Seek
30th Straight
NORMAN, Okla.--()P)-You can
expect a free-scoring game when
Oklahoma goes after its 30th
straight football victory against
Nebraska here today.
Oklahoma, no. 1 team in the
nation, and Nebraska meet to de-
cide the Big Seven Conference pen-
nant winner. A Sooner victory
would give Oklahoma its third
straight title while a loss would
allow Nebraska to share the flag.
Oklahoma is a three-touchdown
favorite.
THE GAME, to be played before
more than 50,000 in freezing wea-
ther, will be watched closely by
bowl scouts. Oklahoma is mention-
ed for its third straight appearance
in the Sugar Bowl.
If Nebraska wins-or makes a
good showing-it is in Aine for a
post-season game.
But Coach Bud Wilkinson of Ok-
lahoma and Coach Bill Glassford
of Nebraska said they aren't worry-
ing about bowls.
Oklahoma's line shows a super-
iority in allowing 11 points a game
to opponents while Nebraska has
yielded 21.

AL WAHL, WOLVERINE LEADER, CAPTAINS LAST GAME

BENNIE SHOWED

'EM:

TONY CURCILLO
. - -.transmitter
collide, the decision will probably
go to the one whose unsung for-
ward wall is keyed highest.

The Wolverine line
to duplicate any one
sterling performances
has accomplished this

will seek
of three
which it
season.

Dartmouth, Wisconsin and!
Northwestern each felt the brunt
of Michigan's inspired forwards.
Offensively Dick Strozewski, Pete
Kinyon, Carl Kraeger, Jim Wolter
and Bill Ohlenroth can be expect-
ed to repeat the effective perform-
ances which enabled their back-
field teammates to strike for dis-
tance in those three games.
* * *
IF THEY CAN spring Chuck
Ortmann, Leo Koceski or Don Du-
fek into the Ohio secondary a wide
open offensive battle may evolve.
At least fi, e of the Michigan
backs including those just men-
tioned are dangerous when they
find a hole in the enemy line.
The same can be said for seve-
ral fine Buckeye ball carriers in-
cluding peerless Vic Janowicz,
which means that the Wolverine
defensive unit will be a giant fac-
tor in the outcome.
* * *
IT IS MANNED by the team's
most underrated group of players.
At the flanks Harry Allis and Oz-
zie Clark will make their last tac-
kles for Michigan. Both boys have
handled their assignments effect-E
ively through the season.
The names of Tom Johnson
AP SPORT
FLASHES
NEW YORK-()-Young Rex
Layne, a blood-splotched farm boy
from Lewiston, Utah, scored the
fight upset of the year last night
with a unanimous 10-round deci-
sion over cagey old Jersey Joe
Walcott, Camden, N.J. veteran.
Layne a 5 to 1 underdog weighed
192, Walcott, 200.
Fans surged to ringside to cheer
the 22-year-old kid, who only
started fighting pro 18hmonths
ago. He whipped 37-year-old Jer-
sey Joe all the way.
MIAMI, Fla.-(MP)-The Univer-
sity of Miami Hurricanes turned
back a stubborn University of
Iowa eleven, 14-6, before 44,999
in the Orange Bowl last night to
remain undefeated but with one
tie in nine games.
Both teams pushed over a touch-
down in the first period and Miami
added another in the second to
stay ahead. Gordon Watson con-
verted after both Miami touch-
downs.

Hollywood Thrillers Couldn't
Match 1927 Ohio State Game
By CY CARLTON for Michigan and Captain of the
Michigan's Wolverines could do '27 squad.
well to heed their mentor's ex- Weiman won his amazing gam-
ample in their bitter battle with ble. Yost stayed in his seat that
OSU's Buckeyes in Columbus to- day as Bennie Oosterbaan threw
day. three touchdown passes to "Elu-
For it was only 23 years ago, in sive" Louie Gilbert as Michigan
1927, that Bennie Oosterbaan per- swamped the Buckeyes, 21-0.
sonally bewildered the Scarlet and This maneuver of Oosterbaan's
White and sent them to a crush- Thisan de in terpas
ing defeat in one of the most as-
tounding games ever played in throwing department was com-
Michigan Stadium. It had all the pletely unexpected by' the Buck-
hlements of a million dollar Hol- eyes or by the 90,000 fans.
lywood epic.
THE SCENE was uniuqe, the
action colorful and the plot was
"out of this world."
It was the year they built the
stadium, then as now the largest
college owned football arena in
the nation. The game was played
on Dedication Day for the new
stadium and the opponenthwas of
course Ohio.

TOM WATSON
. . . receiver
a sophomore with a bright grid-
ii on future.
Here is the Michigan-Ohio rec-
ord down through the years since
1897:

MICHIGAN
36
S 0
21
86
36
31
4
6
22
10
:13
j 3
19
10
14
14
3
7
19
?3
16
10
S 17
21
0
13
14
1:1
0
0
.0
0
18
21,
40
~20
7
45
14
7
58
21
13
7
812 (iM
los

* * *
Year
1897
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
19:33
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

0H1o STATE

0
0
0
t)
0
6
0
0
0
0
6
:1
3
0
0
1:3
14
14
0
0
0
0
16
0
19
7
7
20
3
0
34
38
21
21
0
14
0
20
21
7
18
3
6
0
3
7
343

Want more drama? The sea-
son was the first for Tad Wei-
man who had taken the un-
enviable job ofreplacing the
great Fielding Yost as coach.
But the old man had not don-
ned his slippers and rolled out
his pipe. Yost was still very much
in the picture as boss of Michi-
gan's athletic setup.
AS DIRECTOR of Athletics he
still demanded the perfection in
his coaches with which he him-
self had' been gifted.
This was the first major game
for Michigan of the 1927 sea-
son and any time the grand old
man might be counted on to
jump out onto the field from his
seat in the stands and take pos-
session of his "Meechigan" team
as he had done once before in
1924 and Weiman would be fin-
ished as head coach.
Want more drama? Weiman
lacked what even then was a
prerequisite for winning grid tus-
sles, a good forward passer. So
he used a bit of old fashioned
horse sense which he may have
learned from the old master Yost.
S* * *
HE FIGURED that a great pass
catcher could do just as well on
the transmitting end as the re-
ceiving end of the ball so he con-
verted one of football's greatest
ends into a passer. The end, of
course, was Bennie Oosterbaan,
then two time All American End

Running a classified ad
Every day is
Sure to bring you

I

.,

There is a third corner to this
year's weird Rose Bowl arrange-
ment.
If Wisconsin's Badgersoaccom-
plish their expected victory over
Minnesota today, they still need
the combination of an Ohio State
tie or win over Michigan and a
Northwestern upset of Illinois to
qualify for the Pasadena classic.
* * *
THAT WOULD leave Ohio the
Conference Champion and Wis-
consin the runner-up.
The only other Big Ten game
scheduled will have the tradi-
tional Old Oaken Bucket at
stake as Indiana visits Purdue.
The Boilermakers are still look-
ing for their first league victory.
The old South for she first time
this season takes over the national
football spotlight today with the
meeting of its two putstanding
powers, Kentucky and Tennessee,
at Knoxville.
* * *
THIS IS THE ONE they have
been looking forward to all year
down there, and on-the-spot r*,-

ports indicate the followers of 't -
elevens have worked themselves in-
to a suitable lather. Kentucky's
unbeaten Wildcats are rated one-
touchdown favorites over the once-
defeated Volunteers, but it looks
more like a toss-up.
Tennessee, a rock-ribbed, sin-
gle-wing outfit which banks on
its running attack, already has
accepted a bid to play Texas in
the Dallas Cotton Bowl on New
Year's Day.
Kentucky, whose Babe Parilli
has established himself one of the
country's most lethal passers,
wishes the worst way to play either
in the New Orleans Suga- Bowl or
the Miami Orange Bowl.
Barring a couple of upsets, the
setting sun should see the all-win-
ning California Bear's champions
of the Pacific Coast for the third
straight time and safely elected to
face Illinois from the Big Ten in
the Rose Bowl. All the bears have
to do is subdue Stanford in their
annual classic before 81,000 at
Berkeley. They are heavily favored.

dichigan won 30,
st 12, tied four)

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Unusual results and
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TONIGHT!
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