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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1950

MIClIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

BUSINESS SERVICES
CLUB 211 SCORES againr Free "yes,
Free" bus service to Miller's Cafeteria
every noon. )2P
DOE'S BARBERS
"Hair Cut While You Wait"
You won't have to wait for a salesman
to sign you up for a 1951 Eisian. $5.00
will buy one, today! Michiganensian.
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office, Equipment Ser-
vice Company, 215 E. Liberty.
Guaranteed repair service on all
makes of typewriters. 16B
STUDENT RATES on FO TUNE-$7.50
a year instead of $12.50. Student Per-
lodical Agency, Phone 2-82-42. )2
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist 308
8. State. Legal, Master, Doctors dis-
ertations, etc. 2-9848 or 24228.s 12-
WASIING-Finished work and ironing.
Also rough dry and wet washing. Free
pick-up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )1B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales, Rentals, and Service'
Morrill's - 314 S. State St. )4B
AL CHASE and his ORCHESTRA
An Arbor's Finest Dance Music!
Phone 3YP-4427 )21B
TYPING-Accurate work, reasonable
rates. Phone 3-4040. ) 3B
TYPING done in my home. Call 2-3357.
)27B
FOR SALE
"BABY IT'S COLD OUTSIDE" - But
yube warm in these FLANNEL-
PAJAMAS. Will not shrink!
$3.95, COUSINS on State Street. )3

SHADES OF CARUSO:
Photo Exhibit Adorns Music Office

FOR SALE
WHIZZER BIKE-$35. Only minor ad-
justmentsBneeded. Call Ed. 2-2915 be-
tween 6-7. )66L
SALE OF LP RECORD COLLECTION-
Large selection. See list at S.M., B.M.T.
A.H., R.L. Morris Winer 2-1021. )100,
PARAKEETS-Mated pairs or babies for
training. Also canaries and finches.
Birds boarded, 562 S. Seventh, Ph 5330.
)12B
KODAK pony 828 camera. Carrying
case & flash gun. Just like new. Ph.
John Goode 2-3662. )101

ROOMS FOR RENT
TOURIST HOME for Overnight Guests.
Bath , shower. reasonable rates. 518 E
Williams St. Phone 3-8454. ) 12R
ROOMS available for students' guests
football week-ends Private home ac-
commodations. Phone 2-9850, 11 :00-
1:00 ,or 6:30-9:30 p.m. )14R
3RD FLOOR STUDIO NEAR CAMPUS-
Prefer two to four art or arch
menestudents Linens, use of dark
room. Student landlord Ph 2-8545,
6-7. 123R

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Chartreuse silk scarf with
coral border. Reward. Call Vivienne.
9244,
LOST-Red shoulder bag. Keep money.
Please return other contents. Paula
Kessel, 3001 Alice Lloyd. )65L
LOST-Yale class ring.Reward. R. B.
Barnett, Lawyers Club. Phone 3-4145.
)71L
LOST Wednesday, Coat belt, brown
white and yellow check. Reward.
Telephone 2-9762. )70L
Read Daily Classifieds

DOUBLE ROOM for 2 college boys.
JACKETS-All wool with warmquilted Call 2-8854. )49R
linings-$10.95. Long surcoat style,-
full zipper front, smart two-tones, al- I A ROOM for a man one block South-
so corduroys. rayons and gabardines east of campus. Ph. 7330. )48R
at this low price. Open till 6 p.m.
Sams Store, 122 E. Washington. )5 PERSONAL
READ TIME this year at the special
reduced Student Rate. Still only 10 ENSIANS for $1.00 Those are your
$4.75 a year (instead of $6.00). Regular earnings every time you sell 10 Michi-
newsdealers do not carry this rate- ganensians. Start selling today! If
it must be accepted by specially- interstedcall at the Ensian offices of
authorized college agencies. Your the Publications Building.
representative is Student Periodical I
Agency, Don Anderson, Grad, man- ENTRANCE THAT GAL!
ager. Address 705 First National Bldg. Learn to dance with
To order you need only phone 2-82-42. RAY HATCH DANCE STUDIOS
)12 209 S. State, Ph. 5083 ) 4P

Hickory Hill

I

MISCELLANEOUS
JOIN OUR REDUCING CLUB
Starting new class. Free information.
Call 8536, Joan's Studios, 625 E.
Liberty. 3M
HELP WANTED
MAKE YOURSELF PROSPEROUS in-
stead of broke. Sell the student rates
on TIME & LIFE on evenings. Phone
Don Anderson, 2-82-42 for details. )2

KIDDIE KARE
Reliable sitters available. Ph. 3-1121
110B
STUDENTS MAY subscribe to LIFE at
thie special Student Rate of $5.00 a
year (Regularly $6.75). Through Stu-
dent Periodical Agency, nbone 2-82-42.
)12
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
122 E. Liberty Phone 8161 )1P
FOR RENT
SUITE for 2 couples and 1 db. rm. for
football weekends. Call 3-8126. )22F

Specialize ini
HALF
FRIED CHICKEN
Piano Music During
Dinner Hour
Feature dinner
on weekdays
$1.00
Open 5-12 Weekdays
11 A.M.-12 P.M. Sundays
'til 2:00 A.M. Fri. and Sat.
Hot Home Biscuits
with Dinners .
4633 Washtenaw

By LEONARD GREENBAUM
Twenty eight years ago the fam-
ed tenor Enrico Caruso performed
his only Ann Arbor concert and
started a little known campus tra-
dition.
After his return to New York,
the idol of the opera sent an au-
tographed photo to Charles A.
Sink, then secretary and business
manager of the University Musical
Society.
* * *
WITH CAURSO'S picture as the
starter Sink began a collection of
the photographs of every concert
artist that performed at the Uni-
versity.
Today President Sink's collec-
tion of over 500 photos adorns
the society's office in Burton
Memorial Tower.
Among the pictures there are
many that have become musical
by-lines: Rachmaninoff, Paderew-
ski, and John McCormack.
There are others though, such
as Johanna Gadski; Alessandro
Bonci, Vladimir de Pachman, that
have faded with time, and whose
once illustrious careers are remem-
bered onlycby the record books and
very few concert goers.
SEVERAL of the musical virtuo-
sos appear twice in the collection.
Yehudi Menuhin is pictured as a
youth of 14 when he played his
first Ann Arbor concert, and then
again long after he had reached
manhood.
There is also a second picture

* * *

NiA An Intimat
Bringing Ciney
From All
-TODAY AND SUNDAY

e Theater
ma Triumphs
Nations

I
i

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
ARTIST'S GALLERY-Charles Sink, president of the University
Musical Society stands before a portion of his vast picture col-
lection of concert artists that have appeared in Ann Arbor.

A Glorious Cast To Enchant You
Tito GOBB. Cina LOLLOBRIGIDA - Afro POLL " Filippo MORUCCI
LOE.ofaCLOWN.
~ ((1<

Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

of Caruso convalescing in his
Italian villa, the last picture tak-
en before the great tenor's death.
Paul Robeson's photo hangs over
the door, a momento of the days in
which, according to Sink, he only
sang.
On the lighter side there is a
Philadelphia Orchestra poster on
which violinist Nathan Milstein
sketched a fiddle into the out-
stretched hands of conductor Eu-
gene Ormandy.
IN ADDITION to the artists'
portraits, there is a political gallery
of Michigan governors, reminiscent
of the years Sink spent as a state

legislator, a period he calls his
youthful days.
There is also a picture series
marking the growth of the Uni-
versity Musical Society: the first,
May Festival in the now demo-
lished "U" Hall; the octagonal
house of the late Prof. Alexander
Winchell, which stood where Hill
Auditorium now stands; and the
raising of the 12 ton, English-
made bell to the top of Burton
tower.
Each year the collection grows
with the addition of new photo-
graphs, new faces, and new names
in its effort to graphically perpe-
tuate a vital part of the Univer-
sity's musical history.

Performances Scheduled from
1:30 P.M. Daily
Admission 50c incl. tax

Miniatures
Disney + Oddity
Whimsy II Unusual

III

catche~IAs your eye,
doesn't it
That's the advantage of classified
advertising . . . It can sell your
product, or find what you want!

***~ *~*~ *~*

Myra Hess Will Appear in
Beethoven ProgramTuesday

Fire Hazard
Reduced by
Sprinlders'
An automatic sprinkling system
was credited with holding damage
to a minimum yesterday 'in a fire
which broke out in the. furnace
room of the Fox Tent & Awning
Co., 624 S. Main.
The sprinkling device prevented
the $500 blaze from spreading to
adjoining rooms, according to fire
chief Ben J. Zahn.
He said yesterday's fire illus-
trated a long-standing contention
by fire prevention authorities that
sprinklers should be used in all
buildings.
"The Haven Hall holocust would
have been far less disastrous had
the building been protected by a
sprinkler system," Zahn said.
He noted that the city fire com-
mission has repeatedly recom-
mended to City Council that usage
of the sprinkling device be made
compulsory.
As yet, Zahn pointed out, the
Council has only gone so far as
to reduce water rates in buildings
where the system is installed.
Zahn termed the safety device
"very effective" in factories and
other large buildings. However, it
has been installed in only a few
University buildings and in about
25 downto n structures, he said.
In addition to slicing fire dam-
age, the device makes for lower
insurance rates, Zahn continued.
"The National Board of Fire
Underwriters claims that severe
damage is caused by only two per
cent of the fires in buildings with
sprinkler systems," Zahn added.
Explaining the intricacies of the
device, Zahn said it starts work-
ing when r o o m temperature
reaches 112 degrees. At that tem-
perature metal plugging the water
pipe on the ceiling melts and wa-
ter starts squirting all over the
room,
UM Television
Will Feature
HobbyShow
The "older generation" will
again get recognition on this Sun-
day's University Television Hour,
on WWJ-TV.
"Living in the Later Years," a
20-minute telescourse, will deal
with creative hobbies that older
people can develop.
Clay sculpture as performed with
a potter's wheel will be demon-
strated by two local women.
Creative arts as hobbies will be
discussed by Wilma Donahue, re-
search psychologist in the Univer-
sity's Institute for Human Adjust-
ment and Carleton Angell, 'artist
at the University Museums.
Another telecourse, "Man in His
World-Human Biology," will cov-
er the part played by food and di-
gestion in man's development.
Painting will also occupy a spot
on the television program, and an
exhibition of "sport\ and circus"
paintings will be previewed.
Read Daily Classifieds
Continuous from 1 P.M.

- Last Times Today -
DAN GALE HERBERT
- Coming Sunday-
JUNE HAVEI WILLIAM LUNHIGAN
GLORIA DEHAYE N "DENNIS HA!
HARRY JAMES

: Ew

* " * *

A DAY OF DEDICATION

To Our Countrymen of All Wars
Armistice Day takes on newer, deeper meaning this year.
For it is dedicated not alone to the soldiers of World War
I or World'War II ... but to all Americans of all times
who have given their lives to advance the cause of
Freedom - for themselves, their fellowmen and for all

LOW
RATES

cd A ae s Uaa ~'2.2.g2.
' aiW0 x ieae ' 21 0 1 --'

The second all-Beethoven pro-
gram of the current concert sea-
son will be presented by the Bri-
tish pianist Myra Hess at 8:30
p.m. Tuesday in Hill Auditorium.
.The famed English artist will
perform three sonatas, the E ma-
jor, the F minor (Appassionata)
and the A flat major.
A national favorite since her
American debut in 1922 she will
be making her fourth Ann Arbor
appearance.
Miss Hess enjoys the distinc-
tion of the title Dame Command-

TIMELY

er of the British Empire. She was
awarded the title by King George
VI for the public services she ren-
dered during the London air blitz
of World War II.
At the time she organized daily
noon hour concerts at the Nation-
al Gallery in London. Initiated for,
the purpose of providing a spir-
itual diversion for the people dur-
ing the days of the blitz, it also
provided work for many musicians'
and added income to the Musi-
cians' Benevolent Fund.

I1

III

humanity. Today, each battle fought brings nearer the
fnal realization of Peace with Freedom. Thus Armistice
Day is dedicated not just to the past ... but to the future.
THE. ANN ARBOR BANK

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

STYLED TO FIT YOUR NEEDS

1108 South University

State Street at Nichels Arcade
Main Street

11

Starting

M, e'n
c U

0

TODAY!

Continuous from 1 P.M.
44c until 5 P.M.
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 P.M.

Get Set !

MR ON K-S z OIL ft

1
1

I

v

w

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of
the Assistant to the President, Room
2552 Administration Building, by
3:00 p.m. on the day preceding pub-
lication (11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1950
VOL. LXI, No. 41
Notices
Sigma Alpha Mu Party: Since
the University cannot approve the
plans for the party scheduled at
Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity Sat-
urday evening, November 11, the.
party has been canceled.
E. A. Walter
Employment Interviews:
A representative from the North
American Aviation Aerophysics
Laboratory, Downey, California
will be interviewing at the Bu-
reau of Appointments on Mon.,
Nov. 13. They are interested in
Electrical, Mechanical, Aeronau-
tical, and Chemical Engineers,
Physicists and Applied Mathema-
ticians getting a Bachelor's degree
in February and in the upper 25
percent of their class. They are al-
so interested in interviewing Mas-
ter and Ph.D. candidates who will
be getting their degrees in June
or sooner. The Aerophysics Lab-
oratory is engaged in research,
development, and production of
long-range guided missiles and
automatic flight and fire control
equipment. Openings are in the
electronic, electromehcanical, pro-
pulsion, aerodynamics, and struc-
tures fields. For further informa-
tion and appointments call the
Bureau of Appointments, Ext. 371.
The office will not be open Satur-
day.

',

The race is on

University Community Center,
Willow Run Village:
Sun., Nov. 12, Village Church
Fellowship (interdenominational):
10:45 a.m., Church Services, Rev.
Levai; Sunday School. 4:30 p.m.,
Discussion Group; Pot-luck Sup-
per.
Mon., Nov. 13, 8 p.m., Modern
Dance Class; Nursery Board Meet-
ing.
Tues., Nov. 14, 8 p.m., "Inter-
view with India," book review by
author, John F. Muehl.
Wed,. Nov. 15, 8 p.m., Dressing
Room Committee Meeting; Cera-
mics.
Thurs., Nov. 16, 8 p.m., Cera-
mics; Choir Practice.
Lectures
University LectLre, auspices of
the Department of Psychology,
"Wave Length and Foveal Excit-
ability." Dr. William J. Crozier,
Professor of Physiology and Direc-
tor of the Laboratory of General
Physiology, Harvard University.
4:15 p.m., Mon., Nov. 13, Lane
Hall,
Events Today,
Saturday Luncheon Discussion
Group: Lane Hall, 12:15 p.m.
Make reservations before 10 a.m.
Canterbury Club: Cider and
doughnuts at Canterbury House
after the game.
Congregational, Disciple, Evan-
gelical and Reformed Guild: Open
House following the game at the
Guild House.
Michigan Christian Fellowship:
Open House after the game at
Lane Hall. Everyone welcome.
(Continued on Page 5)
Dinner Dates by
Thomas
_lJ

for Ens in Salesmen.

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You can
earn extra money
in your spare time
by selling Ensians.
Why Not Investigate
Today?

Now at 3:03 - 6:30 - 9:50

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