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November 09, 1950 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-09

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9,

l

THE MICHIGAN DATLY

PAGE THREE

WHO, WHERE, WHEN:
'M' Must Double Up In Backfield
4N*

Sawyer

Named

T4

By JIM PARKER
There are usually two ways of
looking at what a football coach
sar's.
If the gridiron mentor comes
up with the statement that he
doesn't know who will be playing
where in the backfield in Satur-
day's game, you can figure that+
things are pretty good, or just the
opposite.
IN TH FORMER case it might
be assumed that there is such a
wealth of material around that
the coach himself cannot decide
who is the best man for each po-
sition.
*"Or, there is the second case
in which the coach's squad is so
Richter Wins
Linenan of
Week Award
NEW YORK-(P)-For the sec-
ond straight week a player in the
Pacific Coast Conference has won
the Associated Press lineman of
the week award. This time it is
Les Richter, California guard. Last
week it was Donn Moomaw, UCLA'
center.
Richter, a 19-year-old junior;
from Fresno, Calif., was credited
with a major share in unbeaten
California's victory over Washing-'
ton last Saturday. He was all over
the field in helping to stop Wash-,
ton's attack cold. Several times he!
spilled Washington plays two or
three times in succession.
* * *
A 230-POUNDER who stands six
feet, three inches, the loose-limbed
Richter spent virtually the entire
game rushing and crushing Don
Heinrich, Washington star. He left
the game in the closing minutes
begause of a bad arm, but by then
h4is work was done.
Not only was Richter a tower
of strength on defense, but he
blocked tremendously on offense.
and in addition booted two
points after touchdown.
California and UCLA meet this
Saturday with Richter and Moo-
maw clashing in an individual
lineman duel.
Down in the Southwest where
Texas upset Southern Methodist it
was Lewis "Bud" McFadin, Texas
guard, who drew high praise.
"Practically all the yards we
made were over McFadin's posi-
tion," commented Blair Cherry,
Texas coach.

plagued with injuries that there
is no telling who will be playing
by the time game time rolls
around.
The latter is the case with Mich-
igan's Bennie Oosterbaan.
JUST WHAT combination of
talent to expect to see in the
greater part of the action in this
week's run-in with Indiana's un-
predictable Hoosiers presents a

Tough Schedule Faces
Wolverine Swimmers

opManager
Phil Pilot Edges Stengel,
Rolfe In 1950 Title Poll

fascinating puzzle.
About the starting backfield
lineup for this Saturday there
seems to be little question. Bill
Putich, Charlie Ortmann and
Don Dufek will occupy their reg-
ular posts with either Don Old-
ham or Wes Bradford at the bat-
tered wingback spot.
Veteran Leo Koceski still haunts
the doubtful list although he was
able to participate in drills yes-
terday. Don Peterson seems to be
out for this weekend.
BUT WHAT happens when one
of these starters goes out of the
game gives rise to some rather
hectic juggling.
Suppose Ortmann is on the
sidelines for awhile. Oosterbaan
then has the choice of one of
three backs to fill in for the
Milwaukee passing star.
Among these is Jim Eldridge, a
transplanted right half-back who
has seen only limited action this
year. Then there is Dave Hill, a
sophomore who is no more exper-
ienced than Eldridge and who has
the added handicap of having in-
jured his ankle in practice Mon-
day.
* * *
ONE OTHER possibility for the
Wolverine mentor is to move Pu-
tich from quarterback. Putich
knows the tailback plays but has
never worked out of that position
in a game.
If Putich were to play left
halfback. Pete Palmer or Ted
Topor, a converted fullback,
would move in at quarterback.
Then suppose that Dufek leaves
the game at this point. Ralph
Straffon would come off the bench
to take the place of Michigan's
leading ground gainer.
* * *
BUT THEN if trouble developed
over at the wingback post, Straf-
fon would have to go over to right

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
BILL PUTICH
... versatile signal caller
half. Straffon only this week,
added the wingback position to his
regular fullback responsibilities.
Michigan would then be short
one fullback on the playing field
and Oosterbaan would have
three sophomores, Dave Tink-
ham, Russ Rescorla or Bob Hur-
ley, to choose from.
Only Rescorla has had a chance
to carry the ball from scrimmage
this season. In two tries he pick-
ed up three yards.
* * *
AS IF THERE were not enough
confusion in the offensive set-up
Oosterbaan is faced with a defen-
sive problem if Don Oldham's knee
starts giving him trouble again.
The 165-pound sophomore's con-
dition has improved since his
injury in the Illinois game, but
he's still not in top shape.
Wes Bradford could qualify for
defense as far as speed is concern-
ed, but at 5 ft. 2 inches he is sim-
ply too small.
On the line, the biggest injury
question mark centers over of-
fensive tackle John Hess who suf-
fered an ankle injury'against Min-
nesota two weeks ago.

One of the most arduous sche-
dules of recent years faces Matt
Mann's Michigan swimmers as the
venerable mentor embarks on his
26th year at the Wolverine helm.
With five Conference dual
meets, a trip to the East during
the mid-year vacation, and the
usual season-end Conference and
National Collegiate meets on the
agenda, a team which suffered
severe graduation losses has its
work cut out for it. Michigan has
but three scheduled home meets.
THE MAIZE AND BLUE mer-
men open their season against a
Michigan State team which has
depth and brilliance on January'
13th. The Spartans boast of the
NCAA 100-yard free style cham-
pion, Clark Scholes, and a well-
balanced collection of backstroke
and breaststroke stars.
In addition, Olympic ace
George Hoogerhyde, with a year
of eligibility left, may return to
the fold and make the Spartans
tough in the distance races.
Michigan State is a full-fledged
member of the Big Ten in swim-
ming this season.
Following the far -from-easy
opener, the Wolverines face Pur-
due, the Erie YMCA (in an exhibi-
tion),and LaSalle College (minus
Joe Veideur) on their way East to
meet some of the better Atlantic
Seaboard aggregations.
THEY'LL FINISH UP their
eastern swing against the veteran-
loaded New York AC, a power in
swimming for decades.
The big meet before the Con-
ference competition will take
place on February 24, as de-
fending Big Ten champion Ohio
State invades the I-M pool,
bent on making a bigger splash
than ever against their tradi-
tional rivals.
The Buckeyes had a sophomore-
laden squad in winning the title
and defeating all comers (except

merry-go-round comes
March.

Jan.]
Jan.F
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Marc
Ma

THE SCHEDULE:
13 Michigan State
20 Purdue
3 Erie YMCA
(Exhibition)
5 La Salle
6 & 7 Open Datesh
9 NYAC
12 Minnesota
17 Bowling Green
24 Ohio State
h 3 Iowa

up in
There
There
Ther
There
n East
There
Here
There
Here
There

the Spartans) in dual clashes last
season.
* * *
MICHIGAN, with the distance
nucleus, Matt Mann III and Gus
Stager and conference medley
champ Charles Moss lost by grad-
uation faces a rebuilding task,
and must rely to a large extent on
untried sophomores this year.
Thus, it may be a lean year for
Wolverine swimming.
The long chain of dual meets on
tap for Mann's men should tell
the tale by the time the conference

rch

8-9-10, Western Con-

AP SPORTS ROUNDUP:
Detroit Ties, Toronto Wins In NHL Play

ference Meet, Minneapolis
March 29-30-31, National Col-
legiate Meet (Place not definite,
probably U. of Texas)
Frosh Stress
PassingAttack
Realizing that the Wolverines
will lose their star thrower, Chuck
Ortmann, with the completion of
the 1950 season, a strong passing
attack must necessarily be develop-
ed, and the obvious place to start
is with the freshmen.
Much of yesterday afternoon's
frosh grid practice was spent in
passing as several backfield units
Tigers Here Tonight
Proceeds from tonight's De-
troit Tiger baseball program
will go toward aiding under-.
privileged Ann Arbor youths to
attend the college of their
choice. The event sponsored by
the Ann Arbor Quarterback
Club will be held at the Na-
tional Guard Armory commen-
cing at 8:00 p.m.
ran through plays. Spinners and
passes were featured, as both quar-
terbacks and tailbacks took turns
chucking. .
A LENGTHY scrimmage follow-
ed with passing playing the ma-
jor role. Tailbacks Jim Halushka
and Ken Smith and signal-caller
Stan Byrnes threw most of the
passes, with ends Bob Topp and
Gene Knutson doing much of the
receiving for the freshmen.
At the conclusion of drills, Coach
Weber announced that the names
of freshman numberal winners
would be available latenext week.

MATT MANN
. . begins 26th year
Frosh Shine
In Harriers'
Time Trials
4
By BYRLE ABBIN
Just a little hint as to the future
of Michigan cross country teams
can be gained by watching the
freshman squad work out on the
four plus mile course over the
roaming hills of the University
Golf Course.
If one would look closely he
would see one of the best freshman
cross country squads ever assem-
bled at Michigan, quite above the
average of the squads of the last
few years.
THIS COVERS plenty of terri-
tory, as just about two years ago
the best distance runner in Michi-
gan history, Don McEwen was a
member of one of these frosh
squads.
Ironically enough, the top har-
rier to date has been a Canadian
just like the amazing Don Mc-
Ewen. He is John Ross, an Oak-
ville, Ontario runner.
Right on his heels for outstand-
ing freshman cross country runner
are Bob Hall, a Lowell, Michigan
lad, Terry Iverson of Detroit, Roy
Christianson of Royal Oak, Michi-
gan, Al Jones of Washington, D.C.,
and Jack Carroll of Montreal, Can-
ada.
. * *
COACH DON CANHAM had this
to say about the team, "In races
in time trials against the varsity
they have shown up very well so
far, and they should help much
next year."
Thus the furor of rebuilding
the cross country squad is eon-
.tinuing, and the additions these
freshmen will make next year,
should be quite pronounced on
the results of the cross country
squad.
With Don McEwen as the nuc-
leus, and these new freshmen ad-
ditions as well as present varsity
runners, the picture looks quite
bright for cross country next year.
Also to be considered is their
bolstering of the distance section
of the track team.

PHILADELPHIA - (fP) - Little
did Eddie Sawyer think two years
ago that he would be baseball's
manager of the year in 1950.
"It was the farthest from my
thoughts," said the affable man-
ager of the Philadelphia Phillies
yesterday on being informed he
had been named to that honor in
the Associated Press' annual na-
tionwide poll of sports writers and
sportscasters.
"I KNEW we had a coming ball
club, even though we finished a
bad sixth in 1948," he said, "but
as to myself being selected as the
No. 1 manager after so brief a
period in Major League baseball-
well, I just never gave it a
thought."
Sawyer, the balding former
college professor, edged out
Casey Stengel of the world
champion New York Yankees,
The manager of the National
League champs was named on
164 of the 381 ballots. Stengel,
who won the honor last year,
received 134 votes to finish a
close second.
Four other managers received
recognition. Robert (Red) Rolfe,
who did a great job in directing
SPORTS
JERRY FANGER, Night Editor

KEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
Crew-cuts Flat Tops
New Yorker
9 Hairstylists -- No Waiting
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

his office chair and talked of
1951.
"If the draft doesn't cut too big
a hole we should be right in there
from the start next year," he said.
"After all, it is a young ball club
and should be considerable better
with a year more of experience be-
hind it. But Uncle Sam could play
havoc with us."
AND THEN the subject shifted
to Jim Konstanty, the Phillies' big
relief pitcher named the National
League's most valuable player of
1950.
"I see no reason why Jim
shouldn't be just as effective next
year, even though he did set a
league record of appearing in 74
regular season games," Sawyer de-
clared. "After all it is just like
one pitcher throwing a change.of
pace ball. We'll still have the fast
ballers like Robin Roberts-and
Jim to relieve them with his reper-
toire of slow stuff.
"I never have seen a player who
takes care of himself better the
year around. He is always in con-
dition. All I gave him was confi-
dence and the opportunity."

DETROIT 3-BOSTON 3
BOSTON--The Boston Bruins
came from behind twice to gain
a 3-3 tie with the championship
Detroit Red Wings in a National
Hockey League game that drew a
slim 8,038 crowd last night at the
Boston Garden. Pivotman Paul
Ronty dribbled a 20-foot shot to
give the once-victorious Bruins
their fourth stalemate in 11 starts.
GOALS: (first period) Detroit,
Gaye Stewart. (Second period)
Boston, Pierson; Boston, Creigh-
ton. Detroit, Gee; Letroit, Lindsay.
(Third period) Boston, Ronty.

TORONTO 5-NEW YORK 3
NEW YORK-The first-place
Toronto Maple Leafs extended
their undefeated streak to 11
straight games last night by down-
ing the New York Rangers, 5-3,
before 9,671 National Hockey
League fans.
GOALS: (first period) New
York, Mc Leod; New York, Micko-
ski; New York, Slowinski. Toron-
to Smith. (Second period) Toron-
to, Kennedy; Toronto, Gardner.
(Third Period) Toronto, Smith;
Toronto, Klukay.
* * *
JANOWICZ LEADS BIG TEN
CHICAGO-Vic Janowicz and

Tony Curcillo of Elyria, O., Ohio
State backfield mates, are waging
a nip-and-tuck race for "Big Ten"
high scoring honors. Jaiowicz
holds a one-point lead as the
Buckeyes head into their last three
conference games.
Official statistics released yes-
terday show that Janowicz, versa-
tire 186-pound junior, has scored
two touchdowns and kicked 19 ex-
tra points for 31 points in four
Conference games. Curcillo has
scored five touchdowns in "Big
Ten" play for 30 points. The Buck-
eye twosome has taken a com-
manding lead in the scoring race
with the next highest grouped at
18 points.
DROPO AL ROOKIE OF YEAR
NEW YORK-Walt Dropo, slug-
ging first baseman of the Boston
Red Sox, is the American League's
rookie of the year for 1950. Dropo
poled 15 votes from the 24-man
committee. Ed Ford was second
with six votes. Chico Carrasquel
of the Chicago White Sox came
in third with two votes.

the Detroit Tigers to second place
in the American League, was third
with 51 votes.
* . *
LEO DUROCHER polled 23 for
his feat of piloting the New York
Giants to third position in the
National circuit. Steve O'Neill of
the Boston Red Sox received five
and Bucky Harris of the Washing-
ton Senators, four.
Sawyer, looking very much
like the country gentleman in a
brown ensemble with a flashy
yellow sweater, leaned back in
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